Russia: Sport Federations Removed Athletes From Result of McLaren Report

With the publication of the McLaren Report on the accusation of government sponsored doping from Russia the IOC has ruled that Russia will not be banned from the 2016 Olympic Games, but gave each sport federation a set of rules to follow and remove athletes should they not meet the standards. The notable rules include the removal of all athletes implicated in the report, the removal of athletes whom have doped in the past and the removal of athletes which have not satisfied testing standards after excluding the results from the Moscow lab. While most sports did not make any changes others have.

Before the report was released athletics had already banned all of Russia’s athletes, with the exception of ones which have been out of the Russian testing system long enough. Currently only Darya Klishina has satisfied IAAF’s standard, she will compete in the women’s long jump. The other 67 athletes chosen by Russia did not make the standard. Yuliya Stepanova was also eligible to compete, but due to her role in exposing the Russian doping scandal she currently has not been selected to compete.

Besides athletics the biggest loss of athlete quotas comes from rowing. Originally Russia qualified five boats with 28 athletes (including 2 coxswains). In total 20 athletes were found to not have sufficient testing, causing World Rowing to remove four boats from Russia; the men’s lightweight fours, men’s eights, women’s lightweight double sculls and women’s eights. Russia was allowed to make a team to compete in the men’s fours out of the remaining six rowers; the two coxswains were technically eligible though for obvious reasons were not going to be selected. The reallocated boats went to Australia (women’s eights), Greece (men’s lightweight fours) and Italy (men’s eights and women’s lightweight double sculls).

Overall only one sport suffered a full banned. Due to multiple athletes getting caught doping the International Weightlifting Federation has completely banned Russia. Earlier Russia lost one man and one woman quota due to excess doping violations, but now they have lost the remaining eight (5 men, 3 women) quotas. The women’s quotas have been reallocated to Albania, Georgia and Moldova while the men’s quotas have been reallocated to Belgium, Croatia, El Salvador, Mongolia and Serbia.

In aquatics only swimmers were removed. Four athletes were removed due to having prior doping violations while three more were removed due to being implicated into the report. One of these athletes was open water swimmer Anastasia Krapivina. This means her quota has been reallocated to Hungary’s Anna Olasz.

The International Canoeing Federation announced five athletes scheduled to compete at the 2016 Olympics will be removed due to their involvement in the report. This has caused Russia to lose athlete quotas in five boats; men’s K2 200m, men’s C1 200m, men’s C2 1000m, women’s K1 200m and women’s K2 500m. The quotas have been reallocated to Austria (women’s K2 500m), Germany (women’s K1 200m), Iran (men’s C1 200m) and Sweden (men’s K2 200m). The men’s C2 1000m was not reallocated. The additional boat in the women’s K1 500m which did not use an athlete quota has also been removed.

Edit: Sweden has declined the quota, it has been reallocated to Canada

In cycling six athletes were withdrawn, three due to previous doping violations and three others whom were implicated in the report. Currently the UCI has not named the athletes or any potential change in the quotas.

In modern pentathlon Maksim Kustov and alternate Ilia Frolov were connected in the report and have been excluded. The quota was reallocated to Latvia’s Ruslan Nakonechnyi.

United World Wrestling removed one wrestler due to a prior doping violation. Viktor Lebedev has been removed from his event, men’s freestyle -57kg. The quota was reallocated to Belarus.

In sailing one athlete, in the men’s 470 was connected to the report and has been removed. However, Russia has been given an opportunity to make a late replacement.

In total, including athletics the Russian team has shrank by 122 athletes. While most of them were removed due to previous doping offenses or being included in the report others have been excluded due to being teammates of someone who has doped.

 

Net Athlete Quotas by Nations

  • Italy – 11
  • Australia – 9
  • Greece – 4
  • Austria – 2
  • Canada – 2
  • Albania – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Belgium – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Georgia – 1
  • Germany – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Iran – 1
  • Latvia – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Mongolia – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Russia – -122

 

Note: Possible cycling reallocations have yet to be announced.

 

References

Canoeing Sprint: Canada and Cuba Top Pan Am Championship

Pan American nations qualified to the Olympics at the 2016 Pan American Sprint Canoe Championship. The highest ranked eligible boat in the men’s K1 200m, K2 200m, K1 1000m, K2 1000m, C1 200m, C1 1000m and C2 1000m and the women’s K1 200m, K1 500m and K2 500m qualified to the Olympics. The Pan American Sprint Canoe Championship was held in Gainesville, United States from May 19th to May 21st 2016.

There are a few rules when it comes to qualifying at the continental level for sprint canoeing. First a nation can only qualify a maximum of two athlete quotas from the men’s canoe events. Should a nation qualify two boats in the same category (women’s K1, men’s K2 etc.) they are given the athlete quota in the boat with the longer distance, the other athlete quota will be reallocated to the next highest ranked boat. Finally an athlete can only qualify one athlete quota. Should they qualify in two boats the quota will be given in the largest boat (K2, C2) while the other quota will be allocated to the next highest ranked boat in the K1/C1 event.

For the canoe events Cuba’s Fernando Jorge Rodriguez and Serguey Torres Madrigal won the men’s C2 1000m with a time of 3:31.69. The men’s C1 1000m was won by Canada’s Mark Oldershaw whom finished with a time of 3:52.85. Cuba’s Arnold Rodriguez Castro won the men’s C1 200m with a time of 41.64. However Cuba can only qualify two athlete quotas meaning it must choose one of the boats. Given the scenarios Mexico will likely qualify a boat in either the men’s C1 200m or C2 1000m. In the off-chance that Canada decides to take the C2 1000m over its C1 1000m then Colombia will take the C1 1000m.

The women’s kayak events were dominated by Canada as they won in all three of the Olympic qualifying events. Andreanne Langlois won the K1 200m in a time of 42.98, Lisa Bissonnette won the K1 500m in a time of 1:53.65 and Kathleen Fraser and Genevieve Orton won the K2 500m in a time of 1:41.75. However, Canada already won a quota in the K1 500m from the World Championship meaning the quota for that event was reallocated to second place finisher Margaret Hogan of the United States.

The men’s kayak events saw Cuba’s Reiniel Torres Ribeaux and Jorge Garcia Rodriguez win in the K2 1000m with a time of 3:13.00. The men’s K1 1000m was won by Canada’s Adam van Koeverden whom finished with a time of 3:30.66. Brazil’s Edson Freitas da Silva and Gilvan Bittencourt Ribeiro won the men’s K2 200m with a time of 34.45. Since Brazil won a quota in the men’s kayak its host quota in the men’s K1 1000m has been reallocated to the next best boat at the 2015 World Championship, specifically Belgium. The K1 200m was won by Argentina’s Omar de Andres whom won with a time of 37.47. However, since Argentina already qualified a boat from the World Championship the Olympic quota went to third place finisher Fidel Vargas Duany of Cuba, as silver medalist Freitas of Brazil already qualified through the K2 200m.

This was the final opportunity for athletes to qualify in sprint canoeing. All that is left to do is for nations to confirm the athlete quotas and announce the teams which will compete at the Olympics.

 

Athlete Quotas by Nations

  • Canada – 5
  • Cuba – 5
  • Brazil – 2
  • Mexico – 1
  • United States – 1

 

References

Canoeing Sprint: European Nations Qualify After Sprint Continental Qualifier

Twelve nations qualified boats at the 2016 European Sprint Canoe Olympic Qualifier. The two highest ranked eligible boats in the men’s K1 200m, K1 1000m, C1 200m, C1 1000m, C2 1000m and women’s K1 200m, K1 500m along with the highest ranked eligible boat in the men’s K2 200m, K2 1000m and women’s K2 500m qualified to the Olympics. The European Sprint Canoe Olympic Qualifier was held in Duisburg, Germany from May 18th to May 19th 2016.

There are a few rules when it comes to qualifying at the continental level for sprint canoeing. First a nation can only qualify a maximum of two athlete quotas from the men’s canoe events. Should a nation qualify two boats in the same category (women’s K1, men’s K2 etc.) they are given the athlete quota in the boat with the longer distance, the other athlete quota will be reallocated to the next highest ranked boat. Finally an athlete can only qualify one athlete quota. Should they qualify in two boats the quota will be given in the largest boat (K2, C2) while the other quota will be allocated to the next highest ranked boat in the K1/C1 event.

In the men’s kayak events it was Hungary and Spain whom topped the medal events. Hungary’s Tibor Ufnagel and Bence Dombvari won the men’s K2 1000m with a time of 3:13.223 to qualify their nation to the Olympics. Dombvari would also go on to win the K1 1000m with a time of 3:35.307. However, since Dombvari has already qualified in the K2 event the quotas went to silver and bronze medalists Roman Anoshkin of Russia and Marcus Walz of Spain respectively. In the men’s K2 200m Spain’s Saul Cravitto and Cristian Toro won the event and Olympic quota with a time of 32.040. Cravitto would also win the men’s K1 200m with a time of 34.615. The Olympic quotas went to silver and bronze medalists Bence Horvath of Hungary and Manfredi Rizza of Italy respectively.

The women’s kayak events were topped by Germany and Sweden. In the women’s K2 500m Sweden’s Karin Johansson and Sofia Paldanius won the event and Olympic quota with a time of 1:45.176. The quotas for the women’s K1 500m went to Germany’s Sabrina Hering and Slovakia’s Martina Kohlova whom finished with time of 1:55.378 and 1:55.677 respectively. The women’s K1 200m was won by Germany’s Sabine Volz with a time of 41.470, but since Germany qualified in the K1 500m the two quotas were awarded to silver medalist Linnea Stensils of Sweden and fourth place finisher Francisca Laia of Portugal.

The men’s C2 1000m saw Romania’s Leonid Carp and Stephan Strat barely finishing ahead of Czech Republic’s Jaroslav Radon and Filip Dvorak, winning with a time of 3:37.639. Both nations qualified boats to the Olympics. Carp would also go on to win the C1 1000m with a time of 3:58.288, but since he already qualified the two quotas went to silver and bronze medalists Carlo Tacchici of Italy and Angel Kodinov of Bulgaria respectively. The men’s C1 200m was won by Alfonso Benavides of Spain, winning with a time of 39.245. Also qualifying to the Olympics was Georgia’s Zaza Nadiradze.

This was the final opportunity for European nations to qualify to the Olympics in sprint canoeing. Also to clarify a nation can still take part in the shorter distance/few person events, but they would have to use athletes qualified from other events.

 

Athlete Quotas by Nations

  • Spain – 4
  • Hungary – 3
  • Sweden – 3
  • Czech Republic – 2
  • Italy – 2
  • Romania – 2
  • Bulgaria – 1
  • Georgia – 1
  • Germany – 1
  • Portugal – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Slovakia – 1

 

References

Canoeing Slalom: Final Spots Awarded After European Slalom Championship

Four nations booked their spot to the Olympics at the 2016 European Canoe Slalom Championship. The highest ranked eligible boat from each of the four Olympic events qualified their nation to the Olympics. The format of the championship included a first heat run where the top boats qualified to the semi-final and a second heat run where the top 10 unqualified boats qualified to the semi-final. The semi-final run had the top 10 qualify to the finals. The European Canoe Slalom Championship was held in Liptovsky Mikulas, Slovakia from May 13th to May 15th 2016.

In the men’s C1 Slovenia’s Benjamin Savsek won the first heat in a perfect run with a time of 95.50. The second heat was won by Poland’s Grzegorz Hedwig whom finished with a time of 97.44. The semi-final was won by Germany’s Sideris Tasiadis with a time of 99.79. Since only one eligible boat qualified to the final Spain’s Ander Elosegi automatically qualified his nation to the Olympics. The final was won by Slovakia’s Alexander Slafkovsky with a time of 99.87. His compatriot Michal Martikan and Elosegi finished with the silver and bronze medal respectively with a time of 101.66 and 102.56 respectively.

The men’s K1 was topped by Slovakia’s Jakub Grigar whom won the first heat with a time of 88.51. The second heat was won by Germany’s Paul Boeckelmann whom finished with a time of 91.23. The semi-final was won by Poland’s Maciej Okreglak whom finished with a time of 93.98. Since no one whom reached the final was eligible to qualify to the Olympics the Olympic quota went to 14th place finisher Maarten Hermans of the Netherlands. The event was won by Jiri Prskavec of the Czech Republic whom defeated his compatriot Vavrinec Hradilek by 0.01 as he finished with a time of 91.44. Germany’s Hannes Aigner won the bronze with a time of 92.91.

In the women’s K1 Germany’s Jasmin Schornberg won the first heat with a time of 100.27. The second heat was won by Austria’s Corinna Kuhnle whom recovered from missing a gate during the first run and finished with a time of 98.45. The semi-final was won by Italy’s Stefanie Horn 105.04. Since no eligible boat reached the final the Olympic quota was won by 22nd place finisher Viktoriia Us of the Ukraine. The event was won by Germany’s Melanie Pfeifer whom finished with a time of 108.86. Slovenia’s Ursa Kragelj and Slovakia’s Jana Dukatova won the silver and bronze medal respectively with a time of 109.44 and 111.13 respectively.

The men’s C2 was topped by Poland’s Michal Wiercioch and Grzegorz Majerczak whom won the first heat with a time of 103.28. The second heat was won by Poland’s Piotr Szczepanski and Marcin Pochwala whom finished with a time of 104.50. The semi-final was won by Slovenia’s Luka Bozic and Saso Taljat whom finished with a time of 112.81. No eligible boat reached the final thus the Olympic quota went to 13th place Lukas Werro and Simon Werro of Switzerland. The event was won by Slovakia’s Tomas Kucera and Jan Batik whom finished with a time of 110.70. Bozic and Taljat and Germany’s David Schroeder and Nico Bettge won the silver and bronze medal respectively with a time of 111.16 and 113.23 respectively.

This was the final opportunity for nations to qualify in slalom canoeing. However, there are still opportunities to qualify through the sprint canoeing events with two more continental qualifiers still to go.

 

Boats by Nations

  • Netherlands – 1
  • Spain – 1
  • Switzerland – 1
  • Ukraine – 1

 

References

Canoe Slalom: Three Nations Qualify After Asian Championship

China, Japan and Kazakhstan all qualified boats at the 2016 Asian Canoe Slalom Championship. The highest ranked eligible boat from each Olympic event qualifies their nation to the Olympics. Also a nation cannot qualify more than two athlete quotas through the continental qualifier. The Asian Canoe Slalom Championship was held in Toyama, Japan from April 23rd to April 24th 2016.

During the heats the men’s C1 was topped by China’s Wang Sheng. He was able to hold his position in the semi-final where he completed the course in 94.26, but a missed gate in the final cost him title. Instead it was Wang’s compatriot Shu Jianming which won the event and quota with a time of 95.01. The silver and bronze medals went to China’s Chen Fangjia and Japan’s Kazuya Taniguchi respectively.

The men’s K1’s heats were topped by Japan’s Taku Yoshida, but his rank dropped to fourth in the semi-final as China’s Huang Cunguang topped the field with a time of 89.92. Just like in the C1 Huang missed a gate in the final leaving the title and Olympic quota to his compatriot Tan Ya whom finished with a time of 87.34. The silver and bronze medals went to China’s Quan Xin and Kazakhstan’s Martin Stanovsky respectively.

China’s Li Tong topped the field during the heats of the women’s K1. The semi-final was topped by China’s Li Lu whom finished with a time of 98.19. Li Lu would go on to win the event with a time of 96.24. The silver and bronze medals went to China’s Ren Ye and Japan’s Ren Mishima respectively. China, along with Japan has previously qualified a boat in this event thus the Olympic quota was won by fourth place Xeniya Kondratenko of Kazakhstan.

The top boat during the heats of the men’s C2 came from China’s Chen Fei and Shan Bao. With Chen and Shan missing a gate in the semi-final it was Japan’s Shota Sasaki and Tsubasa Sasaki whom finished with a time of 95.20. Japan would go on to win gold and the Olympic quota with a time of 96.71. The silver and bronze medals went to China’s Zhang Hang and Deng Xiao and China’s Yu Hongmin and Chen Jin respectively. With the quota Japan will now send a boat in each slalom event.

This was the final opportunity for nations of Asia to qualify a boat in canoe slalom. The final continental qualifier, the European qualifiers will be held over the next month.

 

Boats by Nations

  • China – 2
  • Japan – 1
  • Kazakhstan – 1

 

References

Canoeing: African Quotas Decided After African Sprint Championship

Update: April 30 2016

South Africa and Tunisia topped the medal list at the 2016 African Sprint Canoe Championship. The top ranked eligible boats from the men’s K1 200m, K1 1000m, C1 200m, C1 1000m and C2 1000m and the top ranked eligible boats from the women’s K1 200m and K1 500m will qualify their nation to the Olympics. The African Sprint Canoe Championships was held in Durban, South Africa from April 1st to April 3rd 2016.

As a reminder there are a few rules in canoeing which can affect qualification. Firstly only nations which competed at the 2015 World Championship are eligible to qualify to the Olympics, second a nation can only qualify a maximum of two athlete quotas in the canoe (C1, C2) events and finally a nation can only qualify in one boat size (men’s K1, men’s C1 or women’s K1), should they qualify in more than one event the quota will be given to the boat from the longer distance while the 200m boat will be reallocated to the next highest ranked nation.

The finals for the longer distances occurred on the second day of events. The women’s K1 500m had just a direct final and it was South Africa’s Bridgette Hartley whom won the gold medal with a time of 1:55.52. However, since she qualified at the 2015 World Championship the Olympic quota went to silver medalist Tunisia’s Afef Ben Ismail. Going into the final with the fastest time from the heat in the men’s K1 1000m Tunisia’s Mohamed Ali Mrabet was able to finish ahead of South Africa’s Louis Hattingh with a time of 3:36.72 as he qualified to the Olympics.

The men’s C1 1000m was won by Senegal’s Abdoulaye Gueye whom won the event at 4:30.28, over seven second ahead of his closest rival from Sao Tome and Principe. However, Sao Tome and Principe won the Olympic quota due to Senegal not being eligible to win the Olympic quota. The closest final happened in the men’s C2 1000m between boats from Mozambique and Sao Tome and Principe. Requiring a photo finish it was Mozambique who won the event and a spot at the Olympics with a time of 4:16.10, just 0.13 second head of Sao Tome and Principe.

The 200m finals occurred on the third and final day. The men’s K1 200m was a close race between Egypt’s Karim Abdelsamie, Tunisia’s Mohamed Ali Mrabet and South Africa’s Chrisjan Coetzee. Coetzee crossed the finish line 0.03 second ahead of Mrabet to win gold with a time of 37.39. The men’s C1 200m was won by Tunisia’s Khaled Houssine with a time of 44.16. The women’s K1 200m was won by Bridgette Hartley from South Africa with a time of 43.70. The Olympic quota however, went to third place Menatalla Ali Ahmed of Egypt because Bridgette has already qualified an athlete quota and second place Tunisia already qualified in the K1 500m.

There is a good chance that South Africa will decline their quota won in the men’s K1 200m due to having a policy of not accepting continental quotas. When the quota is officially declined it will be reallocated to the next eligible nation, in this case Egypt. This was the final opportunity for African nations to qualify in canoeing.

 

Boats by Nations

  • Tunisia – 3
  • Egypt – 1
  • Mozambique – 1
  • Sao Tome and Principe – 1
  • South Africa – 1

 

References

Canoeing: Australia Qualified in Men’s C1 After Oceania Slalom Championship

Australia qualified a boat while Cook Islands benefited from the reallocation rule at the 2016 Oceania Canoe Slalom Championships. The highest ranked eligible nation will be given a spot to compete in the men’s K1, women’s K1 and men’s C1. While other nations were allowed to participate in the Oceania Championships only nations from the continent were eligible to qualify. The Oceania Canoe Slalom Championship was held in Penrith, Australia from January 19th to January 21st 2016.

One major rule to make a continental event legal is the fact that three eligible boats must compete. This was made impossible for the men’s K1 and women’s K1 to be eligible events since only four nations were allowed to compete at the Oceania championships (the same ones that competed at the 2015 World Championship) and Australia and New Zealand have already qualified. The reallocation process is that the highest ranked nation from that continent at the 2015 World Championships will be given a quota. This means the Cook Islands qualified in both the men’s K1 and women’s K1.

The only eligible event at this championship for Olympic qualification was the men’s C1. Australia would end up taking the spot by virtue of their semi-final appearance as both New Zealand and Fiji failed to reach that stage. Slovakia’s Matej Benus ended up winning gold at the event.

This was the final canoeing qualification event for Oceania. The remaining continents will have their qualification events over the coming weeks.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Cook Islands – 2
  • Australia – 1

 

References