Weightlifting: IWF Sanctions Nations, Announces Reallocation Quotas

The International Weightlifting Federation has sanctioned eight nations due to their athletes testing positive for performance enhancing drugs multiple times. Overall Azerbaijan lost one male and one female quotas, Belarus lost one male quota, Kazakhstan lost one male and one female quotas, Moldova lost two male quotas, North Korea lost one male and one female quotas, Romania lost one male quota, Russia lost one male and one female quotas and Uzbekistan lost one female quota.

Sanctions could be increased to Belarus, Kazakhstan and Russia for a total ban depending on the result of the investigation from the 2008 and 2012 Olympics.

Unsurprisingly this will cause a massive change in the World Championship Rankings for Olympic quotas. Sadly the IWF has not published the change in rankings due to wanting to finalize everything. They however, published the reallocation of those quotas lost by the offending nations along with the six women’s quotas that were not allocated from the individual rankings.

The following nations were given a reallocation quota. For the men they are; Chile, Greece, Guatemala, Israel, Kenya, Nauru, Qatar and Sri Lanka. For the women they are; Argentina, Finland, Iraq, Latvia, Mauritius, Morocco, Peru, Solomon Islands, Sweden, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay.

 

Net Quotas by Nations

  • Argentina – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Greece – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Kenya – 1
  • Latvia – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Morocco – 1
  • Nauru – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Solomon Islands – 1
  • Sri Lanka – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • United Arab Emirates – 1
  • Uruguay – 1
  • Belarus – -1
  • Romania – -1
  • Uzbekistan – -1
  • Azerbaijan – -2
  • Kazakhstan – -2
  • Moldova – -2
  • North Korea – -2
  • Russia – -2

 

References

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Judo: Olympic Rankings Published 113 Nations Qualify

113 nations qualified through the Judo Olympic Rankings. Athletes earned points through various world and continental events over a two year period. There were two methods of qualifying. First the top 22 men and top 14 women qualify with a maximum of one NOC per weight class. Second are the continental qualifiers. The highest ranked, not yet qualified athletes across all events can qualify. Each continent has a set amount of quotas; Africa 24 (14 men, 10 women), Europe 25 (14 men, 11 women), Asia 20 (12 men, 8 women), Oceania 10 (7 men, 3 women), and Pan America 21 (13 men, 8 women). A nation can only earn one spot across all events through this and a single continent can qualify a maximum of two athletes in a single event. The qualification period lasted from May 30th 2014 to May 29th 2016.

In total 113 nations have qualified with France and Japan joining hosts Brazil as being the only nation to have qualified a full team of men and women. Also qualifying a full men’s team are Georgia, Germany, Mongolia, Russia, South Korea and Uzbekistan. Overall 53 nations only qualified through the continental rankings while 14 nations did not receive a continental quota. Oceania did not allocate all 10 of its continental quotas thus the unused quota was reallocated to the athlete with the most points and is not yet qualified among all events, specifically Uzbekistan’s Soyib Kurbonov in the men’s -100kg.

The quotas are tied to the athletes by name with the exception of where multiple athletes from the same nation finished in the top 22 for men and top 14 for women where the nation can choose from among them. All that is left to determine in judo is the tripartite quotas.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • France – 14
  • Japan – 14
  • Germany – 13
  • Mongolia – 13
  • South Korea – 12
  • Netherlands – 11
  • Russia – 11
  • Cuba – 9
  • Canada – 8
  • China – 8
  • Georgia – 8
  • Hungary – 8
  • Uzbekistan – 8
  • Australia – 7
  • Great Britain – 7
  • Israel – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Azerbaijan – 6
  • Portugal – 6
  • United States – 6
  • Algeria – 5
  • Austria – 5
  • Belgium – 5
  • Egypt – 5
  • Italy – 5
  • Kazakhstan – 5
  • Slovenia – 5
  • Spain – 5
  • Poland – 4
  • Romania – 4
  • Sweden – 4
  • Tunisia – 4
  • Turkey – 4
  • Czech Republic – 3
  • Ecuador – 3
  • Iran – 3
  • Morocco – 3
  • North Korea – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • United Arab Emirates – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Belarus – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Chinese Taipei – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Gabon – 2
  • Greece – 2
  • Kosovo – 2
  • Kyrgyzstan – 2
  • Latvia – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • Puerto Rico – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Tajikistan – 2
  • Turkmenistan – 2
  • American Samoa – 1
  • Angola – 1
  • Armenia – 1
  • Aruba – 1
  • Benin – 1
  • Bolivia – 1
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – 1
  • Burkina Faso – 1
  • Cameroon – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Congo – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Côte d’Ivoire – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Dominican Republic – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Fiji – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Gambia – 1
  • Ghana – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Guinea-Bissau – 1
  • Haiti – 1
  • Honduras – 1
  • Iceland – 1
  • India – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Jordan – 1
  • Kenya – 1
  • Lebanon – 1
  • Libya – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Madagascar – 1
  • Mali – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Mozambique – 1
  • Nauru – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Niger – 1
  • Pakistan – 1
  • Palau – 1
  • Papua New Guinea – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Samoa – 1
  • Saudi Arabia – 1
  • Senegal – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Seychelles – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Trinidad and Tobago – 1
  • Uruguay – 1
  • Vanuatu – 1
  • Venezuela – 1
  • Vietnam – 1
  • Zambia – 1

 

References

Triathlon: Qualified Nations List Released

The International Triathlon Union has published its Olympic Qualification List filling out the qualified nations through the Olympic Rankings, Olympic Points List and tripartite nations. The Olympic Rankings and Olympic Points List consisted of approved events including World Championship, Continental Championship and other world events. The top eight nations were allowed to qualify three athletes per gender through the Olympic rankings including the quotas obtained through the continental qualifiers and world qualification event. All other nations were allowed to qualify a maximum of two. Originally the top 39 eligible athletes from the Olympic Rankings qualified their nation to the Olympics, however, reallocations has increased that number. The Olympic Points List gave one quota to each of the five continents to athletes whose nations have yet to qualify in triathlon, provided that they met the minimum ranking of 140. For the tripartite commission, two men’s and two women’s quotas were available to athletes from nations whom have qualified an average of 8 or less athletes from individual events over the past two Olympics. They too had to meet the minimum ranking requirements. The Olympic Rankings and Olympic Points List were created using results from various events from May 15th 2014 to May 15th 2016.

In the men’s race a total of 23 nations qualified through the Olympic Rankings. They include Argentina (2), Australia (2), Azerbaijan, Belgium (2), Brazil, Canada (2), Costa Rica, Denmark, France (2), Germany (2), Great Britain (2), Hungary, Ireland, Italy (2), Mexico, Norway, New Zealand (2), Portugal (2), Russia (3), Slovakia, Spain (2), Switzerland and the United States (3). Since Brazil was among the qualified nations its host quota has been reallocated to Israel. Only one tripartite quota was awarded to Jordan which meant the other quota place was reallocated to Mexico. The Olympic Points List gave quotas to Austria, Barbados and China. Since there were no eligible nations in Africa and Oceania the quotas were reallocated to Hungary and Portugal.

In the women’s race a total of 25 nations qualified through the Olympic Rankings. They include Australia (2), Austria (2), Belgium, Bermuda, Brazil, Canada (2), Czech Republic, France, Germany (3), Great Britain, Hungary (2), Ireland, Italy (2), Japan (2), Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand (3), Poland, Russia (2), Slovenia, South Africa, Spain (3), Switzerland, Ukraine and the United States (2). Since Brazil was among the qualified nations its host quota has been reallocated to the Netherlands. No tripartite quota was awarded in the women’s race meaning the quotas have been reallocated to Belgium and Sweden. The Olympic Points List gave quotas to China, Ecuador, Estonia and Mauritius. Since there were no eligible nations in Oceania the quota was reallocated to Canada.

Overall the eight nations which will send three athletes in the men’s race are Australia, France, Great Britain, Mexico, Portugal, Russia, Spain and the United States. For the women the nations are Australia, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Japan, New Zealand, Spain and the United States. As a reminder this is a provisional list and is subjected to the approval of nations so there is the potential for reallocation.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Canada – 5
  • Germany – 5
  • New Zealand – 5
  • Russia – 5
  • Spain – 5
  • United States – 5
  • Australia – 4
  • Belgium – 4
  • Hungary – 4
  • Italy – 4
  • Austria – 3
  • France – 3
  • Great Britain – 3
  • Mexico – 3
  • Portugal – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Brazil – 2
  • China – 2
  • Ireland – 2
  • Japan – 2
  • Netherlands – 2
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • Barbados – 1
  • Bermuda – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Denmark – 1
  • Ecuador – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Jordan – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Poland – 1
  • Slovakia – 1
  • Slovenia – 1
  • South Africa – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • Ukraine – 1

 

References

Badminton: Olympic Qualification Rankings Released

With the final update of the Olympic Badminton Rankings the initial lists of qualified athletes have been announced. The Olympic Badminton Rankings included tournaments such as the World Championships, Continental Championships, Grand Prixes and others. The ranking period for the Olympic Badminton Rankings were from May 5th 2015 to May 1st 2016.

The top 34 athletes in the single rankings qualified to the Olympics. However, there is a maximum of two athletes per nation if both athletes are in the top 16 in the overall rankings. If not the maximum quota for each nation is one. Also all five continents must be represented with the highest ranking athlete from the continent automatically qualifying. The tripartite quotas also count towards the continental representation.

For the doubles rankings the top 16 teams qualified to the Olympics. Similarly, there is a maximum of two teams per nation if both teams are in the top 8 in the overall rankings. If not the maximum quota for each nation is one team. Also all continents that have at least one team in the top 50 will be granted a spot to the Olympics.

Overall China qualified the most quotas, winning the maximum of two entrants in all five events. In addition Denmark, Germany, Great Britain, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea and the United States have at least one qualified entrant in all five events. In total, 41 nations have qualified at least one athlete.

There have been some reallocations due to the same athlete competing in two events. For the men China’s Zhang Nan, Germany’s Michael Fuchs and United States’ Phillip Chew have qualified in both the men’s doubles and mixed doubles. Brazil also qualified through the men’s singles releasing its host quota. These quotas will be reallocated to the men’s singles benefitting Portugal’s Pedro Martins, Austria’s David Obernorsterer, Canada’s Martin Giuffre and Czech Republic’s Petr Koukal.

Similarly China’s Zhao Yunlei, Denmark’s Christinna Pedersen and Netherlands’ Selena Piek qualified both in the women’s doubles and mixed doubles. These extra quotas will be reallocated to the women’s singles benefitting Switzerland’s Sabrina Jaquet, Ireland’s Chloe Magee and Portugal’s Telma Santos.

Also Australia will have to give up two of its continental quotas due to the rule allowing a nation to only benefit from a maximum of two continental quotas. The quotas will be reallocated to the next best eligible nation from Oceania first. If there are no eligible nations it will be reallocated to the next best ranked eligible nation regardless of continent.

Confirmation of quotas and tripartite invitations still remain so there will be a few changes between now and at the beginning of the Olympics, but for the most part the majority of athletes here will compete at the Olympics.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • China – 10
  • South Korea – 9
  • Denmark – 6
  • Indonesia – 6
  • Japan – 6
  • Germany – 5
  • Great Britain – 5
  • Hong Kong – 5
  • India – 5
  • Malaysia – 5
  • Thailand – 5
  • United States – 5
  • Australia – 4
  • Poland – 3
  • Russia – 3
  • Chinese Taipei – 3
  • Austria – 2
  • Belgium – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Canada – 2
  • Czech Republic – 2
  • France – 2
  • Ireland – 2
  • Netherlands – 2
  • Portugal – 2
  • Singapore – 2
  • Spain – 2
  • Ukraine – 2
  • Vietnam – 2
  • Cuba – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Italy – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • South Africa – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • Switzerland – 1
  • Turkey – 1

 

References

Boxing: 13 Nations Qualify After African Championship

13 nations qualified at least one athlete at the 2016 African Boxing Olympic Qualification Tournament. The three highest ranked male boxers along with the highest ranked female boxer qualified to the Olympics. The African Boxing Olympic Qualification Tournament was held in Yaounde, Cameroon from March 11th to March 19th 2016.

Overall 181 athletes from 30 nations competed in 10 men’s and 3 women’s weight classes. The first day of finals saw the result of six men’s events. Cameroon and Morocco led the day by qualifying in three events each. Cameroon won the gold medal in the men’s light flyweight (-49kg) and middleweight (-75kg) also 2008 Olympian Mahaman Smaila will return to the Olympics in the men’s light welterweight (-64kg). Despite not winning events on the first day of finals Morocco qualified in the men’s bantamweight (-56kg), light welterweight and middleweight. Tunisia won the men’s bantamweight and qualified in the men’s heavyweight (-91kg), Namibia won the men’s lightwelterweight and qualified in the light flyweight, Algeria won the men’s light heavyweight (-81kg) and qualified in the heavyweight and Mauritius won the men’s heavyweight and qualified in the middleweight. Other qualifiers included Egypt in the light heavyweight, Lesotho in the bantamweight, South Africa in the light flyweight and Uganda in the light heavyweight.

Morocco swept the women’s events by winning gold in all three events and claiming the three quotas. In the women’s flyweight (-51kg) Zohra Ez-Zahraoui defeated Nigeria’s Caroline Linus, in the lightweight (-60kg) Hasnaa Lachgar defeated Tunisia’s Hlimi Khouloud and in the middleweight (-75kg) Khadija El Mardi defeated Cameroon’s Azangue Yannicke.

On the second day of finals for men Algeria was the big winner for Olympic quotas despite not winning an event. Algeria qualified in the men’s flyweight (-52kg) with 2015 World Championship bronze medalist Mohamed Flissi, the lightweight (-60kg) and the welterweight (-69kg). Egypt won gold in the lightweight and also qualified in the welterweight. The other gold medalists were Kenya in the welterweight, Nigeria in the super heavyweight (+91kg) and South Africa in the flyweight. Other nations which qualified to the Olympics included Morocco in the super heavyweight, Seychelles in the lightweight, Tunisia in the super heavyweight and Uganda in the flyweight.

As a reminder South Africa has a policy of not accepting quotas won at the continental level, therefore should they decline the quotas they would be reallocated to Kenya in the light flyweight and Lesotho in the flyweight. There are still a few more opportunities for African nations to qualify their athletes to the Olympics.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Morocco – 7
  • Algeria – 5
  • Cameroon – 3
  • Egypt – 3
  • Tunisia – 3
  • Mauritius – 2
  • Namibia – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Uganda – 2
  • Kenya – 1
  • Lesotho – 1
  • Nigeria – 1
  • Seychelles – 1

 

References

Cycling Mountain: South Africa Wins Both Races at African Championships

South Africa had another good meet at the 2015 Mountain Biking African Championships held in Musanze, Rwanda from May 8th to May 10th 2015. Not only do they possess the best mountain cyclists of the continent, but they also have the most numerous. In terms of Olympic qualification the top two nations in the men’s cross-country race and the top nation in the women’s cross-country race will be given quotas to compete.

In the women’s race it was South Africa’s Bianca Haw who won the race as she pushed a lead of 1 min 29 seconds ahead of her teammate Cherie Vale finishing with a time of 1:43:23. Namibia’s Michelle Vorster was able to beat out the other South African challengers, stopping the sweep of medals finishing with a time of 1:48:25.

The sweep was not prevented in the men’s race as not only did South Africa win all three medals, but they had a monopoly on the top 5. James Reid had an impressive performance as he dominated the field from essentially start to finish and won the race with a time of 1:54:28, a 3min 40 second lead over second place Matthys Beukes. Third place went to Rourke Croeser whom finished just under 2 hours with a time of 1:59:29. The second Olympic quota went to sixth place Yannick Lincoln of Mauritius.

As a reminder the Olympic quotas are not set in stone because the Olympic qualification for mountain biking has the world rankings with a higher priority over the continental championships. Therefore, if any nation qualifies through the rankings the next highest ranked nation at the continental championship will take the continental spot. Looking at the 2014 and current rankings South Africa is favoured to qualify in the men’s rankings though they will have some work to do if they want to qualify through the women’s rankings. For reallocation purposes the next best ranked nation in the men’s event was Rwanda and for the women’s event it was Namibia.

Quotas by Nation

  • South Africa – 2
  • Mauritius – 1

References