Weightlifting: Canada and Cuba Qualify in Both Genders At Pan American Championship

Canada and Cuba topped their respective team Olympic rankings at the 2016 Pan American Weightlifting Championship. The team Olympic rankings are constructed from points obtained from the top six men or top four women out of the nations which have not already qualified. The top seven men’s teams and the top four women’s teams qualify one athlete each. The Pan American Weightlifting Championship was held in Cartagena, Colombia from June 6th to June 11th 2016.

Canada was the top nation in the women’s events where they accumulated 109 points. They were followed by Puerto Rico whom finished with 103 points. Being anchored by gold medal winner Maria Valdes in the women’s -75kg Chile finished in third with 101 points while Cuba grabbed the final quota as they finished with 97 points.

One of the biggest shocks of the championship came in the men’s events where regional powerhouse Venezuela had their first three lifters fail to finish their event, leaving only five athletes left to compete. Overall Cuba topped the Olympic rankings, finishing with a total of 148 points. Ecuador finished in second with 143 points while Mexico and the United States finished equal at 141 points. Dominican Republic and Peru also qualified to the Olympics with 129 and 126 points respectively. Despite having only five remaining lifters Venezuela was still in a position to qualify going into the final event. Canada however, spoiled the unlikely achievement by doing just enough to win the final Olympic quota, finishing with a total of 118 points, just 1 point ahead of Venezuela.

This was the final continental qualifier in weightlifting. Unqualified nations can still qualify through the individual rankings where the cut-off will occur in the coming weeks. Also left to decide are the tripartite quotas.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Canada – 2
  • Cuba – 2
  • Chile – 1
  • Dominican Republic – 1
  • Ecuador – 1
  • Mexico – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Puerto Rico – 1
  • United States – 1

 

References

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Volleyball: Mexico Makes Its Long Return By Winning Intercontinental Tournament

Mexico topped the group at the 2016 Men’s Volleyball Olympic Intercontinental Qualification Tournament. In total four teams (2 African, 1 North American and 1 South American) competed in a round robin tournament where the winner qualified to the Olympics. The Men’s Volleyball Olympic Intercontinental Qualification Tournament was held in Mexico City, Mexico from June 3rd to June 5th 2016.

The first set of matches saw Chile and Mexico defeat Tunisia and Algeria in straight sets. In the next set Mexico was placed in a strong position after they defeated Chile in a 3-1 match. In the other match Tunisia defeated Algeria 3-1. In the final set of matches Chile kept its hope alive by defeating Algeria in a 3-1 match. However, despite losing to Tunisia Mexico was able to force a fifth set Mexico and thus was able to grab the 12th and final Olympic spot. This will be Mexico first Olympic appearance since they themselves hosted the Olympics back in 1968.

 

Tournament Rankings

  1. Mexico
  2. Chile
  3. Tunisia
  4. Algeria

 

References

Judo: Olympic Rankings Published 113 Nations Qualify

113 nations qualified through the Judo Olympic Rankings. Athletes earned points through various world and continental events over a two year period. There were two methods of qualifying. First the top 22 men and top 14 women qualify with a maximum of one NOC per weight class. Second are the continental qualifiers. The highest ranked, not yet qualified athletes across all events can qualify. Each continent has a set amount of quotas; Africa 24 (14 men, 10 women), Europe 25 (14 men, 11 women), Asia 20 (12 men, 8 women), Oceania 10 (7 men, 3 women), and Pan America 21 (13 men, 8 women). A nation can only earn one spot across all events through this and a single continent can qualify a maximum of two athletes in a single event. The qualification period lasted from May 30th 2014 to May 29th 2016.

In total 113 nations have qualified with France and Japan joining hosts Brazil as being the only nation to have qualified a full team of men and women. Also qualifying a full men’s team are Georgia, Germany, Mongolia, Russia, South Korea and Uzbekistan. Overall 53 nations only qualified through the continental rankings while 14 nations did not receive a continental quota. Oceania did not allocate all 10 of its continental quotas thus the unused quota was reallocated to the athlete with the most points and is not yet qualified among all events, specifically Uzbekistan’s Soyib Kurbonov in the men’s -100kg.

The quotas are tied to the athletes by name with the exception of where multiple athletes from the same nation finished in the top 22 for men and top 14 for women where the nation can choose from among them. All that is left to determine in judo is the tripartite quotas.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • France – 14
  • Japan – 14
  • Germany – 13
  • Mongolia – 13
  • South Korea – 12
  • Netherlands – 11
  • Russia – 11
  • Cuba – 9
  • Canada – 8
  • China – 8
  • Georgia – 8
  • Hungary – 8
  • Uzbekistan – 8
  • Australia – 7
  • Great Britain – 7
  • Israel – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Azerbaijan – 6
  • Portugal – 6
  • United States – 6
  • Algeria – 5
  • Austria – 5
  • Belgium – 5
  • Egypt – 5
  • Italy – 5
  • Kazakhstan – 5
  • Slovenia – 5
  • Spain – 5
  • Poland – 4
  • Romania – 4
  • Sweden – 4
  • Tunisia – 4
  • Turkey – 4
  • Czech Republic – 3
  • Ecuador – 3
  • Iran – 3
  • Morocco – 3
  • North Korea – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • United Arab Emirates – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Belarus – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Chinese Taipei – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Gabon – 2
  • Greece – 2
  • Kosovo – 2
  • Kyrgyzstan – 2
  • Latvia – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • Puerto Rico – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Tajikistan – 2
  • Turkmenistan – 2
  • American Samoa – 1
  • Angola – 1
  • Armenia – 1
  • Aruba – 1
  • Benin – 1
  • Bolivia – 1
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – 1
  • Burkina Faso – 1
  • Cameroon – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Congo – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Côte d’Ivoire – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Dominican Republic – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Fiji – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Gambia – 1
  • Ghana – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Guinea-Bissau – 1
  • Haiti – 1
  • Honduras – 1
  • Iceland – 1
  • India – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Jordan – 1
  • Kenya – 1
  • Lebanon – 1
  • Libya – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Madagascar – 1
  • Mali – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Mozambique – 1
  • Nauru – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Niger – 1
  • Pakistan – 1
  • Palau – 1
  • Papua New Guinea – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Samoa – 1
  • Saudi Arabia – 1
  • Senegal – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Seychelles – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Trinidad and Tobago – 1
  • Uruguay – 1
  • Vanuatu – 1
  • Venezuela – 1
  • Vietnam – 1
  • Zambia – 1

 

References

Cycling Road: Women’s Olympic Rankings Published

The Union Cycliste Internationale has published the Women’s Olympic Qualification Rankings which are used to allocate the majority of competitors in women’s road race and time trial. Athletes can earn points for their nation in UCI approved events. For the women’s road race initially the top 5 nations earn four athlete quotas, nations ranked 6th to 13th earn three quotas and nations ranked 14th to 22nd earn two quotas. However, if an athlete is ranked in the top 100 in the individual rankings and their nation did not qualify through the nation rankings they will earn their nation a maximum of one quota. The quota is subtracted from the lowest ranked nations (those nations can only lose a maximum of one quota). For the time trial the top 15 nations from the rankings will be allowed to send one athlete which has qualified from the road race. The Women’s Olympic Qualification Rankings are calculated from various events held from June 1st 2015 to May 31st 2016.

For the women’s road race the women’s individual rankings contained 12 nations where athletes finished in the top 100, but their nation did not finished in the top 22 in the nation rankings. They are Chinese Taipei (Huang Ting Ying), Norway (Emile Moberg), Brazil (Flavia Oliveira), Azerbaijan (Olena Pavlukhina), Thailand (Jutatip Maneephan), Austria (Martina Ritter), Slovenia (Polana Batagelj), Lithuania (Daiva Tuslaite), Cyprus (Antri Christoforou), Israel (Shani Bloch), Japan (Mayuko Hagiwara) and Chile (Paola Munoz). This has caused nations ranked from 11 to 22 to lose one quota. Netherlands, United States, Italy, Australia and Germany qualified four athlete quotas. Poland, Sweden, Great Britain, Canada and Belgium qualified three athlete quotas. France, South Africa and Luxembourg qualified two athlete quotas. Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Finland, Cuba, New Zealand, Mexico, Switzerland and Spain qualified one athlete quota. Since Cuba qualified through the nation rankings its continental qualifier quota was reallocated to the next best ranked eligible nation from the Pan American qualifier, specifically Venezuela. Also since Brazil qualified one quota through the rankings one of their host quota will be reallocated to the highest ranked nation not yet qualified, Colombia.

The nations which qualified through the women’s time trial are as follows; Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, South Africa, Sweden, Ukraine and the United States. As a reminder these nations do not gain an athlete quota, they must use athletes which were qualified from the road race. Due to this rule both the Czech Republic and Russia which qualified quotas from the 2015 World Championship do not have enough athletes to fill that spot. The quotas have now been reallocated to the next highest eligible ranked nation from the event, specifically Japan and Sweden.

This was the final opportunity for nations to qualify to the Olympics in all disciplines of cycling. All that is left is for nations to confirm the quotas in which they were given.

 

Athletes by Nations

  • Australia – 4
  • Germany – 4
  • Italy – 4
  • Netherlands – 4
  • United States – 4
  • Belgium – 3
  • Canada – 3
  • Great Britain – 3
  • Poland – 3
  • Sweden – 3
  • France – 2
  • Luxembourg – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Austria – 1
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Brazil – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Chinese Taipei – 1
  • Colombia – 1
  • Cuba – 1
  • Cyprus – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Japan – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Mexico – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Slovenia – 1
  • Spain – 1
  • Switzerland – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Ukraine – 1

 

References

Canoeing Sprint: Canada and Cuba Top Pan Am Championship

Pan American nations qualified to the Olympics at the 2016 Pan American Sprint Canoe Championship. The highest ranked eligible boat in the men’s K1 200m, K2 200m, K1 1000m, K2 1000m, C1 200m, C1 1000m and C2 1000m and the women’s K1 200m, K1 500m and K2 500m qualified to the Olympics. The Pan American Sprint Canoe Championship was held in Gainesville, United States from May 19th to May 21st 2016.

There are a few rules when it comes to qualifying at the continental level for sprint canoeing. First a nation can only qualify a maximum of two athlete quotas from the men’s canoe events. Should a nation qualify two boats in the same category (women’s K1, men’s K2 etc.) they are given the athlete quota in the boat with the longer distance, the other athlete quota will be reallocated to the next highest ranked boat. Finally an athlete can only qualify one athlete quota. Should they qualify in two boats the quota will be given in the largest boat (K2, C2) while the other quota will be allocated to the next highest ranked boat in the K1/C1 event.

For the canoe events Cuba’s Fernando Jorge Rodriguez and Serguey Torres Madrigal won the men’s C2 1000m with a time of 3:31.69. The men’s C1 1000m was won by Canada’s Mark Oldershaw whom finished with a time of 3:52.85. Cuba’s Arnold Rodriguez Castro won the men’s C1 200m with a time of 41.64. However Cuba can only qualify two athlete quotas meaning it must choose one of the boats. Given the scenarios Mexico will likely qualify a boat in either the men’s C1 200m or C2 1000m. In the off-chance that Canada decides to take the C2 1000m over its C1 1000m then Colombia will take the C1 1000m.

The women’s kayak events were dominated by Canada as they won in all three of the Olympic qualifying events. Andreanne Langlois won the K1 200m in a time of 42.98, Lisa Bissonnette won the K1 500m in a time of 1:53.65 and Kathleen Fraser and Genevieve Orton won the K2 500m in a time of 1:41.75. However, Canada already won a quota in the K1 500m from the World Championship meaning the quota for that event was reallocated to second place finisher Margaret Hogan of the United States.

The men’s kayak events saw Cuba’s Reiniel Torres Ribeaux and Jorge Garcia Rodriguez win in the K2 1000m with a time of 3:13.00. The men’s K1 1000m was won by Canada’s Adam van Koeverden whom finished with a time of 3:30.66. Brazil’s Edson Freitas da Silva and Gilvan Bittencourt Ribeiro won the men’s K2 200m with a time of 34.45. Since Brazil won a quota in the men’s kayak its host quota in the men’s K1 1000m has been reallocated to the next best boat at the 2015 World Championship, specifically Belgium. The K1 200m was won by Argentina’s Omar de Andres whom won with a time of 37.47. However, since Argentina already qualified a boat from the World Championship the Olympic quota went to third place finisher Fidel Vargas Duany of Cuba, as silver medalist Freitas of Brazil already qualified through the K2 200m.

This was the final opportunity for athletes to qualify in sprint canoeing. All that is left to do is for nations to confirm the athlete quotas and announce the teams which will compete at the Olympics.

 

Athlete Quotas by Nations

  • Canada – 5
  • Cuba – 5
  • Brazil – 2
  • Mexico – 1
  • United States – 1

 

References

Triathlon: Qualified Nations List Released

The International Triathlon Union has published its Olympic Qualification List filling out the qualified nations through the Olympic Rankings, Olympic Points List and tripartite nations. The Olympic Rankings and Olympic Points List consisted of approved events including World Championship, Continental Championship and other world events. The top eight nations were allowed to qualify three athletes per gender through the Olympic rankings including the quotas obtained through the continental qualifiers and world qualification event. All other nations were allowed to qualify a maximum of two. Originally the top 39 eligible athletes from the Olympic Rankings qualified their nation to the Olympics, however, reallocations has increased that number. The Olympic Points List gave one quota to each of the five continents to athletes whose nations have yet to qualify in triathlon, provided that they met the minimum ranking of 140. For the tripartite commission, two men’s and two women’s quotas were available to athletes from nations whom have qualified an average of 8 or less athletes from individual events over the past two Olympics. They too had to meet the minimum ranking requirements. The Olympic Rankings and Olympic Points List were created using results from various events from May 15th 2014 to May 15th 2016.

In the men’s race a total of 23 nations qualified through the Olympic Rankings. They include Argentina (2), Australia (2), Azerbaijan, Belgium (2), Brazil, Canada (2), Costa Rica, Denmark, France (2), Germany (2), Great Britain (2), Hungary, Ireland, Italy (2), Mexico, Norway, New Zealand (2), Portugal (2), Russia (3), Slovakia, Spain (2), Switzerland and the United States (3). Since Brazil was among the qualified nations its host quota has been reallocated to Israel. Only one tripartite quota was awarded to Jordan which meant the other quota place was reallocated to Mexico. The Olympic Points List gave quotas to Austria, Barbados and China. Since there were no eligible nations in Africa and Oceania the quotas were reallocated to Hungary and Portugal.

In the women’s race a total of 25 nations qualified through the Olympic Rankings. They include Australia (2), Austria (2), Belgium, Bermuda, Brazil, Canada (2), Czech Republic, France, Germany (3), Great Britain, Hungary (2), Ireland, Italy (2), Japan (2), Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand (3), Poland, Russia (2), Slovenia, South Africa, Spain (3), Switzerland, Ukraine and the United States (2). Since Brazil was among the qualified nations its host quota has been reallocated to the Netherlands. No tripartite quota was awarded in the women’s race meaning the quotas have been reallocated to Belgium and Sweden. The Olympic Points List gave quotas to China, Ecuador, Estonia and Mauritius. Since there were no eligible nations in Oceania the quota was reallocated to Canada.

Overall the eight nations which will send three athletes in the men’s race are Australia, France, Great Britain, Mexico, Portugal, Russia, Spain and the United States. For the women the nations are Australia, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Japan, New Zealand, Spain and the United States. As a reminder this is a provisional list and is subjected to the approval of nations so there is the potential for reallocation.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Canada – 5
  • Germany – 5
  • New Zealand – 5
  • Russia – 5
  • Spain – 5
  • United States – 5
  • Australia – 4
  • Belgium – 4
  • Hungary – 4
  • Italy – 4
  • Austria – 3
  • France – 3
  • Great Britain – 3
  • Mexico – 3
  • Portugal – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Brazil – 2
  • China – 2
  • Ireland – 2
  • Japan – 2
  • Netherlands – 2
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • Barbados – 1
  • Bermuda – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Denmark – 1
  • Ecuador – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Jordan – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Poland – 1
  • Slovakia – 1
  • Slovenia – 1
  • South Africa – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • Ukraine – 1

 

References

Archery: Six Nations Qualify After American Qualification Tournament

Six nations qualified athletes after the Archery American Continental Qualification Tournament. The top three archers in each gender qualify their nation to the Olympics. A nation can qualify a maximum of a single quota for each gender. The event was held just before the World Cup event in Medellin, Columbia from May 8th to May 9th 2016.

In the women’s recurve it was Venezuela’s Leidys Brito who led all athletes after the ranking round with Canada’s Georcy-Stephanie Thiffeault Picard finishing second. Brito would go on reach the final with a pair of 6-0 wins while Thiffeault Picard lost in a tie-break to Venezuela’s Mayra Mendez in the semi-final. Since Venezuela can only qualify one athlete this meant Canada also automatically booked a spot to the Olympics. The third Olympic spot was considered to be an upset where 12 seeded (out of 14) Yessica Camilo of the Dominican Republic defeated Guatemala’s Esmeralda Valencia Sanchez 6-2 and won a tie-breaker against Cuba’s Elizabeth Rodriguez to win the Dominican Republic’s first quota in archery. Brito won the event by winning a tie-breaker against Mendez while Thiffeault Picard won the bronze medal.

Mexico was the top nation in the men’s recurve ranking round as Juan Serrano and Ernesto Boardman took the top two spots respectively while Luis Alvarez finished in fifth. The three would all go to reach the semi-final and actually sweep the medals with Boardman defeating Serrano in the final. The largest upset occurred in the second round where Argentina’s Ignacio Escalante defeated third seed Juan Carlos Stevens 6-4. Unfortunately Escalante failed to grab the quota as El Salvador’s Oscar Ticas subsequently defeated him to reach the semi-final. The third Olympic quota went to fifth place finisher Guillermo Aguilar Gimpel of Chile.

Non-qualified nations can still have one more opportunity to qualify to the Olympics at the final qualification tournament to be held during the Antalya World Cup event. Nations will also be able to upgrade their individual qualification to a team qualification at the event.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Canada – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Dominican Republic – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Mexico – 1
  • Venezuela – 1

 

References

  • Ianseo. World Archery Americas CQT – Results. Access on May 10 2016.