Diving: FINA Announces Participating Athletes

FINA has released the list of athletes which will compete in diving. The list also reveals the additional divers added to reach the maximum quota. Each gender had a maximum quota of 68 athletes for the individual and synchronized diving events. For every athlete which competed in the synchronized event, but not the individual event caused the individual event to have one fewer athlete competing relative to the maximum. In summary in the men’s 3m springboard 29 athletes will compete in the individual event and in the women’s 3m springboard and men’s and women’s 10m platform 28 athletes will compete in the individual event.

The next best ranked divers from the 2016 Diving World Cup were added to reach the aliquoted individual quota. This means for the men’s 3m springboard Germany and Austria gained an additional quota and for the men’s 10m platform Italy, Canada and Belarus gained quotas.

For the women’s events there were also declinations of quotas. For the women’s 3m springboard the Netherlands and South Africa declined a quota while Japan declined a quota it would have received through the reallocation process. Similarly in the women’s 10m platform Japan declined a quota while the Netherlands declined a quota it would have received through the reallocation process. Overall for the women’s 3m springboard Germany, United States, Colombia, Russia, Egypt, New Zealand and South Africa gained quotas to compete and in the women’s 10m platform Ukraine, Germany, Hungary, Brazil and Russia gained quotas.

There is still one female quota left unallocated, this was likely due to South Africa’s late rejection of one of their women’s 3m springboard quotas. It is likely the quota will eventually be filled by the next highest ranked athlete from the 2016 Diving World Cup, specifically Croatia.

Update: Croatia has received the quota in women’s 3m springboard.

 

New Quotas by Nations

  • Germany – 3
  • Russia – 2
  • Austria – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Brazil – 1
  • Canada – 1
  • Colombia – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Egypt – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Italy – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Ukraine – 1
  • United States – 1
  • Japan – -1
  • Netherlands – -1

 

Overall Athletes by Nation

  • China – 13
  • Great Britain – 11
  • United States – 10
  • Australia – 9
  • Brazil – 9
  • Mexico – 9
  • Germany – 8
  • Italy – 8
  • Russia – 8
  • Canada – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Malaysia – 6
  • Colombia – 4
  • Egypt – 4
  • France – 3
  • Japan – 3
  • North Korea – 3
  • Belarus – 2
  • Venezuela – 2
  • Austria – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Ireland – 1
  • Jamaica – 1
  • Netherlands – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Puerto Rico – 1
  • South Africa – 1
  • South Korea – 1

 

References

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Weightlifting: IWF Sanctions Nations, Announces Reallocation Quotas

The International Weightlifting Federation has sanctioned eight nations due to their athletes testing positive for performance enhancing drugs multiple times. Overall Azerbaijan lost one male and one female quotas, Belarus lost one male quota, Kazakhstan lost one male and one female quotas, Moldova lost two male quotas, North Korea lost one male and one female quotas, Romania lost one male quota, Russia lost one male and one female quotas and Uzbekistan lost one female quota.

Sanctions could be increased to Belarus, Kazakhstan and Russia for a total ban depending on the result of the investigation from the 2008 and 2012 Olympics.

Unsurprisingly this will cause a massive change in the World Championship Rankings for Olympic quotas. Sadly the IWF has not published the change in rankings due to wanting to finalize everything. They however, published the reallocation of those quotas lost by the offending nations along with the six women’s quotas that were not allocated from the individual rankings.

The following nations were given a reallocation quota. For the men they are; Chile, Greece, Guatemala, Israel, Kenya, Nauru, Qatar and Sri Lanka. For the women they are; Argentina, Finland, Iraq, Latvia, Mauritius, Morocco, Peru, Solomon Islands, Sweden, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay.

 

Net Quotas by Nations

  • Argentina – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Greece – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Kenya – 1
  • Latvia – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Morocco – 1
  • Nauru – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Solomon Islands – 1
  • Sri Lanka – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • United Arab Emirates – 1
  • Uruguay – 1
  • Belarus – -1
  • Romania – -1
  • Uzbekistan – -1
  • Azerbaijan – -2
  • Kazakhstan – -2
  • Moldova – -2
  • North Korea – -2
  • Russia – -2

 

References

Judo: Olympic Rankings Published 113 Nations Qualify

113 nations qualified through the Judo Olympic Rankings. Athletes earned points through various world and continental events over a two year period. There were two methods of qualifying. First the top 22 men and top 14 women qualify with a maximum of one NOC per weight class. Second are the continental qualifiers. The highest ranked, not yet qualified athletes across all events can qualify. Each continent has a set amount of quotas; Africa 24 (14 men, 10 women), Europe 25 (14 men, 11 women), Asia 20 (12 men, 8 women), Oceania 10 (7 men, 3 women), and Pan America 21 (13 men, 8 women). A nation can only earn one spot across all events through this and a single continent can qualify a maximum of two athletes in a single event. The qualification period lasted from May 30th 2014 to May 29th 2016.

In total 113 nations have qualified with France and Japan joining hosts Brazil as being the only nation to have qualified a full team of men and women. Also qualifying a full men’s team are Georgia, Germany, Mongolia, Russia, South Korea and Uzbekistan. Overall 53 nations only qualified through the continental rankings while 14 nations did not receive a continental quota. Oceania did not allocate all 10 of its continental quotas thus the unused quota was reallocated to the athlete with the most points and is not yet qualified among all events, specifically Uzbekistan’s Soyib Kurbonov in the men’s -100kg.

The quotas are tied to the athletes by name with the exception of where multiple athletes from the same nation finished in the top 22 for men and top 14 for women where the nation can choose from among them. All that is left to determine in judo is the tripartite quotas.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • France – 14
  • Japan – 14
  • Germany – 13
  • Mongolia – 13
  • South Korea – 12
  • Netherlands – 11
  • Russia – 11
  • Cuba – 9
  • Canada – 8
  • China – 8
  • Georgia – 8
  • Hungary – 8
  • Uzbekistan – 8
  • Australia – 7
  • Great Britain – 7
  • Israel – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Azerbaijan – 6
  • Portugal – 6
  • United States – 6
  • Algeria – 5
  • Austria – 5
  • Belgium – 5
  • Egypt – 5
  • Italy – 5
  • Kazakhstan – 5
  • Slovenia – 5
  • Spain – 5
  • Poland – 4
  • Romania – 4
  • Sweden – 4
  • Tunisia – 4
  • Turkey – 4
  • Czech Republic – 3
  • Ecuador – 3
  • Iran – 3
  • Morocco – 3
  • North Korea – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • United Arab Emirates – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Belarus – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Chinese Taipei – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Gabon – 2
  • Greece – 2
  • Kosovo – 2
  • Kyrgyzstan – 2
  • Latvia – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • Puerto Rico – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Tajikistan – 2
  • Turkmenistan – 2
  • American Samoa – 1
  • Angola – 1
  • Armenia – 1
  • Aruba – 1
  • Benin – 1
  • Bolivia – 1
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – 1
  • Burkina Faso – 1
  • Cameroon – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Congo – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Côte d’Ivoire – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Dominican Republic – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Fiji – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Gambia – 1
  • Ghana – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Guinea-Bissau – 1
  • Haiti – 1
  • Honduras – 1
  • Iceland – 1
  • India – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Jordan – 1
  • Kenya – 1
  • Lebanon – 1
  • Libya – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Madagascar – 1
  • Mali – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Mozambique – 1
  • Nauru – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Niger – 1
  • Pakistan – 1
  • Palau – 1
  • Papua New Guinea – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Samoa – 1
  • Saudi Arabia – 1
  • Senegal – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Seychelles – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Trinidad and Tobago – 1
  • Uruguay – 1
  • Vanuatu – 1
  • Venezuela – 1
  • Vietnam – 1
  • Zambia – 1

 

References

Table Tennis: Team Quotas Confirmed However Singles Quota Rejected

All nations participating in the team events in table tennis have confirmed their spot with the third athlete being announced. However there has been one rejection in the women’s singles event. Ukraine’s Margaryta Pesotska’s quota has been rejected by her NOC. The quota has been reallocated to the next highest ranked eligible athlete in the Olympic rankings, specifically Hungary’s Petra Lovas. Hungary must confirm the quota for this to be finalized.

The third team members, which only compete in the team event are as follows, for the women; Yousra Abdelrazek (Egypt), Liu Shiwen (China), Xiaona Shan (Germany), Bruna Takahashi (Brazil), Jiaqi Zheng (United States), Ziyu Zhang (Australia), Mima Ito (Japan), Yihan Zhou (Singapore), Yana Tie (Hong Kong), Yang Haeun (South Korea), Huang Yi-Hua (Chinese Taipei), Ri Mi Gyong (North Korea), Britt Eerland (Netherlands), Bernadette Szocs (Romania), Natalia Partyka (Poland) and Qiangbing Li (Austria).

For the men’s team event the third members will be; Bode Abiodun (Nigeria), Xu Xin (China), Bastian Steger (Germany), Cazuo Matsumoto (Brazil), Timothy Wang (United States), Heming Hu (Australia), Maharu Yoshimura (Japan), Kwan Kit Ho (Hong Kong), Joao Monteiro (Portugal), Yoo Saehyuk (South Korea), Tristan Flore (France), Mattias Karlsson (Sweden), Daniel Habeson (Austria), Daniel Gorak (Poland), Chiang Hung-Chieh (Chinese Taipaei) and Samuel Walker (Great Britain).

 

References

Table Tennis: Team Quotas Announced

With the singles quotas confirmed the International Table Tennis Federation has announced the team quotas for each gender. The team quotas were determined through the Olympic Team Rankings. The highest ranking nation from each of the six continents which qualified two athletes qualified their nation to the Olympics. In addition the overall top 10 nations which qualified two athletes also qualified their nation. By qualifying in a team event nations can add one more athlete to their team though the athlete can only compete in the team event. The nations can gain points towards the Olympic Team Rankings through their performance at select world and continental events. The deadline to gain points was May 1st 2016.

For the women’s teams the continental quotas went to China, Germany, United States, Brazil, Egypt and Australia. The tournament was complete with the addition of Japan, Singapore, Hong Kong, South Korea, Chinese Taipei, North Korea, Netherlands, Romania, Poland and Austria.

The continental quotas for the men’s teams went to China, Germany, Brazil, Nigeria, United States and Australia. The tournament was complete with the addition of Japan, Hong Kong, Portugal, South Korea, France, Sweden, Austria, Poland, Chinese Taipei and Great Britain.

Nations must confirm the quotas before they become finalized. In addition there will be seven reallocated quotas to the singles for both genders due to the excess of quotas for athletes only participating in the team events and the host quota.  While it is simple to calculate where those quotas would go it is best to wait for the ITTF to officially announce them.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Australia – 2
  • Austria – 2
  • Brazil – 2
  • China – 2
  • Chinese Taipei – 2
  • Germany – 2
  • Hong Kong – 2
  • Japan – 2
  • Poland – 2
  • South Korea – 2
  • United States – 2
  • Egypt – 1
  • France – 1
  • Great Britain – 1
  • Netherlands – 1
  • Nigeria – 1
  • North Korea – 1
  • Portugal – 1
  • Romania – 1
  • Singapore – 1
  • Sweden – 1

 

References

Wrestling: 1st World Qualifier Qualifies 28 Nations

28 nations qualified at least one athlete at the 1st World Wrestling Qualification Tournament. The top three athletes from the men’s freestyle and Greco-Roman and the top two athletes from the women’s freestyle qualified their nations to the Olympics. The 1st World Wrestling Qualification Tournament was held in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia from April 22nd to April 24th 2016.

Belarus topped the Greco-Roman events by winning two gold medals. Aliaksandr Hrabovik defeated Georgia’s Revazi Nadareishvili in the -98kg while Javid Hamzatau defeated Armenia’s Maksim Manukyan in the -85kg. Armenia secured a second quota in the -75kg where Arsen Julfalakyan won the third place bout. The -75kg was won by Hungary’s Peter Bacsi in a walkover after China’s Yang Bin withdrew. China’s Meng Qiang also withdrew in the -130kg to give Iran’s Amir Ghasemi the victory. Uzbekistan’s Muminjon Abdullaev won the third place bout while his compatriot Elmurat Tasmuradov won the play-off match in the -59kg. The -59kg was won by South Korea’s Kim Seung-Kak whom defeated Norway’s Stig Andre Berge. Romania’s Ion Panait won the -66kg event over Finland’s Tero Valimaki. Lithuania’s Edgaras Venckaitis won the third place bout. Sweden also qualified two athletes in the third place bouts via Zakarias Berg in the -85kg and Fredrik Schon in the -98kg.

The United States qualified two athletes in the women freestyle events. In the -53kg Helen Maroulis defeated Greece Maria Prevolaraki while Haley Augello lost to North Korea’s Kim Hyon-Gyong in the -48kg. Hungary also qualified two athletes to the Olympics, but lost both of their final bouts. In the -63kg Marianna Sastin had to withdraw giving Turkey’s Hafize Sahin the victory while Zsanett Nemeth lost to France’s Cynthia Vescan in the final of the -75kg. The -58kg was won by Ecuador’s Lissette Antes whom defeated Germany’s Luisa Niemesch while the -69kg was won by Israel’s Ilana Kratysh whom defeated Venezuela’s Maria Acosta in the final. This will Israel’s first female wrestler to compete at the Olympics.

The final day contained results from the men’s freestyle events. In the -65kg it was Bahrain’s Adam Batirov whom defeated Georgia’s Zurabi Iakobishvili in the final. Third place bout winner Yakup Gor of Turkey also qualified to the Olympics. Turkey ended up qualifying a second quota as they won the -74kg event over Bulgaria’s Georgi Ivanov. Moldova’s Evgheni Nedealco also qualified to the Olympics by winning the third place bout. Moldova won a second third place bout through Nicolae Ceban in the -97kg event. The event was won by Armenia’s Georgy Ketoyev whom defeated Uzbekistan’s Magomed Ibragimov. The -86kg event was won by J’den Cox of the United States who defeated Venezuela’s Pedro Ceballos in the final. The third place bout was won by Poland’s Zbigniew Baranowski. Poland won a second third place bout with Robert Baran in the -125kg event. The event was won by China’s Deng Zhiwei in a walkover against Hungary’s Daniel Ligeti. The -57kg event was won by Romania’s Ivan Guidea whom defeated Azerbaijan’s Mirjalal Hasanzada in the final. The third place bout was won by Sandeep Tomar of India.

With this competition Azerbaijan and Georgia will be sending full men’s freestyle teams. Unqualified nations will get one more opportunity to qualify to the Olympics at a second world qualification tournament due to be held in May.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Hungary – 4
  • Armenia – 3
  • China – 3
  • Turkey – 3
  • United States – 3
  • Uzbekistan – 3
  • Belarus – 2
  • Georgia – 2
  • Moldova – 2
  • Poland – 2
  • Romania – 2
  • Sweden – 2
  • Venezuela – 2
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • Bahrain – 1
  • Bulgaria – 1
  • Ecuador – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • France – 1
  • Germany – 1
  • Greece – 1
  • India – 1
  • Iran – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • North Korea – 1
  • South Korea – 1

 

References

Table Tennis: Asian Athletes Book Their Spots After Asian Qualification Tournament

13 nations qualified athletes at the end of the 2016 Asian Table Tennis Olympic Qualification Tournament. In total 11 quotas for each gender were available for single players. In the first stage players were divided into their five regions (West Asia, Middle Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia and East Asia) where a single elimination tournament was played with the winner qualifying to the Olympics. The second stage combined all of the unqualified athletes into four brackets where a single elimination tournament was played. The winner of the four brackets qualified to the Olympics while the runner-up played the runner-up of another bracket. The two winners also qualified to the Olympics. The Asian Table Tennis Olympic Qualification Tournament was held in Hong Kong, China from April 13th to April 17th 2016.

Qatar’s Ping Li was the top athlete from West Asia where he defeated Saudi Arabia’s Abdulaziz Al-Abbad in the final 4-0. The women’s quota went to Lebanon’s Mariana Sahakian whom defeated her compatriot Malak Khory in the final 4-2.

Middle Asia was won by Iran in both genders. Despite being down 1-3 against Uzbekistan’s Olga Kim Iran’s Neda Shahsavari won the next three sets to win the match in a 4-3 upset. On the men’s side the final came down to two brothers from Iran with Nima Alamian defeating his brother Noshad 4-2.

South Asia only had a single nation competing in both tournaments, India. All that was left to decide was which athlete would book its spot to the Olympics. Due to each tournament only containing four players a round robin was played instead of a single elimination tournament. The women’s tournament was won by top seed Manika Batra though she did suffer a shock 4-2 loss to Pooja Sahasrabudhe along the way. There was an upset in the men’s tournament as top seed Sharath Achanta lost two matches. The winner of the tournament was second seed Soumyajit Ghosh.

The Southeast Asia tournaments were dominated by regional powerhouse Singapore. In fact between the two tournaments seven out of the eight semi-finalists were from Singapore. The winner of the men’s tournament was Chen Feng whom defeated his compatriot Li Hu 4-2 in the final. On the women’s side Singapore’s Feng Tianwei defeated her compatriot Yu Mengyu 4-0 in the final.

Considered to be the strongest region it was China whom won the two East Asia tournaments. The winner of the men’s tournament was Ma Long whom defeated his compatriot Fan Zhendong 4-1. The women’s tournament was won by Li Xiaoxia whom defeated Japan’s Kasumi Ishikawa in a 4-0 sweep.

While the second stage was to include the top two (or one should a nation already qualify one) athletes who haven’t qualified from each nation many athletes withdrew from the competition due to mathematically being already qualified to the Olympics through the World Rankings. This allowed several lower qualified athletes to secure their spot to the Olympics.

On the men’s side Draw A was won by Kazakhstan’s Kirill Gerassimenko whom caused an upset against Hong Kong’s Jiang Tianyi, winning 4-0. Draw B had India’s Sharath Achanta completing a comeback against Iran’s Noshad Alamiyan going from 1-3 to winning 4-3. Draw C was won by Chinese Taipei’s Chen Chien-An whom defeated Thailand’s Padasak Tanviriyavechakul 4-2. Hong Kong’s Ho Kwan Kit won Draw D by defeating Uzbekistan’s Zokhid Kenjaev 4-1. For the final two quotas the losing finalists went up against each other with Alamiyan defeating Jiang 4-1 and Kenjaev defeating Tanviriyavechakul in a close 4-3 match.

For the women’s side it was North Korea and Thailand which won two of the four draws each. North Korea’s Ri Myong Sun defeated India’s Mouma Das 4-0 while her compatriot, Kim Song I defeated Indonesia’s Lilis Indriani 4-0. Thailand’s Suthasini Sawettabut defeated Uzbekistan’s Rimma Gufranova 4-0 while her compatriot, Nanthana Komwong defeated Philippines’ Ian Lariba in a close 4-3 match. For the final two quotas the losing finalists went up against each other with Das defeating Gufranova 4-1 and Lariba defeating Indriani 4-0.

Athletes from Asia will have one more opportunity to qualify to the Olympics with the publication of the World Rankings in the coming weeks. Since so many top athletes withdrew from the second stage many of them will be booking their spot through that pathway.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • India – 4
  • Iran – 3
  • China – 2
  • North Korea – 2
  • Singapore – 2
  • Thailand – 2
  • Chinese Taipei – 1
  • Hong Kong – 1
  • Kazakhstan – 1
  • Lebanon – 1
  • Philippines – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Uzbekistan – 1

 

References