Russia: Sport Federations Removed Athletes From Result of McLaren Report

With the publication of the McLaren Report on the accusation of government sponsored doping from Russia the IOC has ruled that Russia will not be banned from the 2016 Olympic Games, but gave each sport federation a set of rules to follow and remove athletes should they not meet the standards. The notable rules include the removal of all athletes implicated in the report, the removal of athletes whom have doped in the past and the removal of athletes which have not satisfied testing standards after excluding the results from the Moscow lab. While most sports did not make any changes others have.

Before the report was released athletics had already banned all of Russia’s athletes, with the exception of ones which have been out of the Russian testing system long enough. Currently only Darya Klishina has satisfied IAAF’s standard, she will compete in the women’s long jump. The other 67 athletes chosen by Russia did not make the standard. Yuliya Stepanova was also eligible to compete, but due to her role in exposing the Russian doping scandal she currently has not been selected to compete.

Besides athletics the biggest loss of athlete quotas comes from rowing. Originally Russia qualified five boats with 28 athletes (including 2 coxswains). In total 20 athletes were found to not have sufficient testing, causing World Rowing to remove four boats from Russia; the men’s lightweight fours, men’s eights, women’s lightweight double sculls and women’s eights. Russia was allowed to make a team to compete in the men’s fours out of the remaining six rowers; the two coxswains were technically eligible though for obvious reasons were not going to be selected. The reallocated boats went to Australia (women’s eights), Greece (men’s lightweight fours) and Italy (men’s eights and women’s lightweight double sculls).

Overall only one sport suffered a full banned. Due to multiple athletes getting caught doping the International Weightlifting Federation has completely banned Russia. Earlier Russia lost one man and one woman quota due to excess doping violations, but now they have lost the remaining eight (5 men, 3 women) quotas. The women’s quotas have been reallocated to Albania, Georgia and Moldova while the men’s quotas have been reallocated to Belgium, Croatia, El Salvador, Mongolia and Serbia.

In aquatics only swimmers were removed. Four athletes were removed due to having prior doping violations while three more were removed due to being implicated into the report. One of these athletes was open water swimmer Anastasia Krapivina. This means her quota has been reallocated to Hungary’s Anna Olasz.

The International Canoeing Federation announced five athletes scheduled to compete at the 2016 Olympics will be removed due to their involvement in the report. This has caused Russia to lose athlete quotas in five boats; men’s K2 200m, men’s C1 200m, men’s C2 1000m, women’s K1 200m and women’s K2 500m. The quotas have been reallocated to Austria (women’s K2 500m), Germany (women’s K1 200m), Iran (men’s C1 200m) and Sweden (men’s K2 200m). The men’s C2 1000m was not reallocated. The additional boat in the women’s K1 500m which did not use an athlete quota has also been removed.

Edit: Sweden has declined the quota, it has been reallocated to Canada

In cycling six athletes were withdrawn, three due to previous doping violations and three others whom were implicated in the report. Currently the UCI has not named the athletes or any potential change in the quotas.

In modern pentathlon Maksim Kustov and alternate Ilia Frolov were connected in the report and have been excluded. The quota was reallocated to Latvia’s Ruslan Nakonechnyi.

United World Wrestling removed one wrestler due to a prior doping violation. Viktor Lebedev has been removed from his event, men’s freestyle -57kg. The quota was reallocated to Belarus.

In sailing one athlete, in the men’s 470 was connected to the report and has been removed. However, Russia has been given an opportunity to make a late replacement.

In total, including athletics the Russian team has shrank by 122 athletes. While most of them were removed due to previous doping offenses or being included in the report others have been excluded due to being teammates of someone who has doped.

 

Net Athlete Quotas by Nations

  • Italy – 11
  • Australia – 9
  • Greece – 4
  • Austria – 2
  • Canada – 2
  • Albania – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Belgium – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Georgia – 1
  • Germany – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Iran – 1
  • Latvia – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Mongolia – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Russia – -122

 

Note: Possible cycling reallocations have yet to be announced.

 

References

Swimming: China Tops Marathon Swimming Olympic Qualifiers

China won gold in both events at the 2016 Marathon Swimming Olympic Qualifier. In each event the top 10 highest ranked athletes, with a maximum of one athlete per nation qualified to the Olympics. Similarly the highest ranked eligible athlete from each continent also qualified to the Olympics. The Marathon Swimming Olympic Qualifier was held in Setubal, Portugal from June 11th to June 12th 2016.

In the women’s 10km race it was China’s Yan Siyu whom led the pack for the first two laps. She would go on to lose the lead with Poland’s Joanna Zachoszcz leading at the end of the third lap and her compatriot Xin Xin leading in the fourth and fifth laps, but she remained within the lead group. Going into the sixth and final lap the lead group was numbered at about 10. During the final lap three swimmers; Xin Xin, Great Britain’s Keri-Anne Payne and Ecuador’s Samantha Arevalo broke away and had a sprint swim towards the finish line where Xin finished ahead of Payne with a time of 1:55:12.1, just 0.8 seconds ahead. Arevalo won the bronze medal.

The top 10 eligible swimmers which qualified to the Olympics were;  Xin Xin (China), Keri-Anne Payne (Great Britain), Samantha Arevalo (Ecuador), Chelsea Gubecka (Australia), Yumi Kida (Japan), Michelle Weber (South Africa), Joanna Zachoszcz (Poland), Paola Perez (Venezuela), Spela Perse (Slovenia) and Jana Pechanova (Czech Republic). The five continental qualifiers were Erika Villaecija (Spain), Stephanie Horner (Canada), Heidi Gan (Malaysia), Charlotte Webby (New Zealand) and Reem Kaseem (Egypt).

The men’s 10km race saw multiple lead changes and had a lead group of about 20 athletes going into the final lap. As the final lap progressed the number of athletes in the lead group dwindled, until only China’s Zu Lijun remained as he won the race with a time of 1:52:18.2. 2.2 second later Germany’s Christian Reichert won the silver while Ecuador’s Ivan Enderica Ochoa won the bronze.

The top 10 eligible swimmers which qualified to the Olympics were; Zu Lijun (China), Christian Reichert (Germany), Ivan Enderica Ochoa (Ecuador), Evgenii Drattcev (Russia), Ous Mellouli (Tunisia), Richard Nagy (Slovakia), Jarrod Poort (Australia), Yasunari Hirai (Japan), Chad Ho (South Africa) and Ventsislav Aydarski (Bulgaria). The five continental qualifiers were Mark Papp (Hungary), Erwin Maldonado (Venezuela), Kane Radford (New Zealand), Vitaliy Khudyakov (Kazakhstan) and Marwan Elamrawy (Egypt).

This was the final opportunity to qualify in marathon swimming. Swimmers can still attempt to qualify to the pool events by reaching the qualification times.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Australia – 2
  • China – 2
  • Ecuador – 2
  • Egypt – 2
  • Japan – 2
  • New Zealand – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Venezuela – 2
  • Bulgaria – 1
  • Canada – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Germany – 1
  • Great Britain – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Kazakhstan – 1
  • Malaysia – 1
  • Poland – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Slovakia – 1
  • Slovenia – 1
  • Spain – 1
  • Tunisia – 1

 

References

Swimming: France, Russia and United States Qualify in All 6 Relays

The United States led all nations in indoor swimming events at the 2015 World Aquatics Championships. While no direct qualification is given to nations competing in the individual events athletes could use this event to reach the Olympic Qualification Time so that they could be available to be chosen by their nations. Also competing in the world championships is a requirement for nations planning on applying for a tripartite spot. The relay events however do have spots available for Olympic qualification. The top 12 relay teams at each of the six Olympic relays will qualify their nation to the Olympics. The World Aquatics Championships was held in Kazan, Russia from July 24th to August 9th 2015. The swimming events were held from August 2nd to August 9th 2015.

The United States, Australia and the Netherlands led all teams during the heats of the women’s 4x100m freestyle relay. Most of the excepted teams finished within the top 12 to qualify with the exception of Germany who was beaten by Poland for the final spot. In the final while Australia had a slow start they were able to take over the lead during the second leg and hold it on route to a championship record with a time of 3:31.48. Netherlands’ Femke Heemskerk’s strong final leg was good enough to catch and win the silver over the United States.

The 12 nations to qualify to the Olympics are Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Sweden and the United States.

The men’s 4x100m freestyle relay had quite a few surprising results. Firstly a relatively slow fourth heat caused the United States and Germany to both miss the final though they finished well enough to qualify to the Olympics. Even more surprising was the fact Australia missed the top 12 altogether and will now have to qualify to the Olympics via the secondary method. The top 3 nations in the heats were Russia, Brazil and Italy. In the final France barely avoided disqualification as third leg swimmer Fabien Gilot had a reaction time of 0.00 seconds, reacting any sooner would have DQd them. Since they weren’t disqualified they were able to win the gold medal with a time of 3:10.74. Russia won the silver medal while Italy overtook Brazil in the final leg to win the bronze medal.

The 12 nations to qualify to the Olympics are Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, Poland, Russia and the United States.

The expected nations qualified to the final in the women’s 4x200m freestyle relay as Italy, the United States and Australia led all nations in the heats. The start of the final had a surprise twist as Sweden elected to start off with their strongest swimmer, Sarah Sjostrom and as expected Sweden led all nations. They were however able to maintain their lead over all nations before the final leg. However, Ida Marko-Varga was unable to compete with the other nation’s top swimmers as Sweden fell from first to just off the podium in fourth place. The United States won gold with a time of 7:45.37 while the fastest time among the final swimmers Italy’s Federica Pellegrini moved her nation from fifth to the silver medal. China passed Great Britain and Sweden in the final leg to take bronze.

The 12 nations to qualify to the Olympics are Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, Russia, Sweden and the United States.

For the men’s 4x200m freestyle relay the top three nations in the heats were the United States, Australia and Great Britain. On the other side Italy lost its Olympic qualification spot by 0.05 seconds as Denmark took the final spot. In the final the United States led off by Ryan Lochte began in the lead and were set to win the gold medal. However, James Guy of Great Britain was able to put up the fastest leg of the entire race to move his team from third to the gold medal with a national record time of 7:04.33. The United States had to settle for silver while Australia used its final leg to pass Russia for the bronze medal.

The 12 nations to qualify to the Olympics are Australia, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Japan, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Spain and the United States.

The men’s 4x100m medley relay was led by the United States, Australia and France during the heats. For the most part the expected nations qualified to the final, but Canada just missed out in Olympic qualification finishing just behind Lithuania who set a national record. In the final Australia led all swimmers after the first leg, but was taken over by Adam Peaty and Great Britain during the breaststroke leg. In the third leg Tom Shields used his impressive butterfly to move the United States from third to first. In the final leg Australia’s Cameron McEvoy used a strong freestyle to move from fourth to second as they were 0.15 seconds away from catching the United States who finished with a time of 3:29.93. France’s Fabien Gilot was able to pass Great Britain during the final leg to win the bronze medal.

The 12 nations to qualify to the Olympics are Australia, France, Germany, Great Britain, Japan, Poland, Russia and the United States.

The women’s 4x100m medley relay was led by China, the United States and Sweden during the heats. A lot of things happened during the final; firstly both Great Britain and Japan were disqualified during the race for leaving the blocks too early and an illegal hand touch respectively. This not only ended their bid for a medal, but also cost them their spot at the Olympics as all teams that qualified to the finals must finish the race in the final to be given the spot. The spots were reallocated to Finland and Brazil, the next highest ranked teams during the heats.

For the other six teams Australia’s Emily Seebohm led her country after the backstroke, but it was Shi Jinglin of China that took the lead during the breaststroke. China would ultimately hang on to the lead to win gold with a time of 3:54.41. The United States was in second during the breaststroke, but Sweden’s Sarah Sjostrom was able to pass them during the butterfly. During the final freestyle leg Australia’s Bronte Campbell had an amazing freestyle which pushed her team from fifth to third, but Sweden’s Louise Hansson was able to hold on for the silver, setting a European record in the process.

The 12 nations to qualify to the Olympics are Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Russia, Sweden and the United States.

Four spots in each relay event will be available to the nations not yet qualified with the fastest times in the FINA World Rankings released just before the Olympics. I expect most of those spots to be filled with nations which had poor performances or disqualifications at the world championships, but there were some nations not known for swimming that are on the edge of qualifying that could provide competition.

Quotas by Nation

  • France – 6
  • Russia – 6
  • United States – 6
  • Australia – 5
  • Brazil – 5
  • China – 5
  • Germany – 5
  • Italy – 5
  • Japan – 5
  • Canada – 4
  • Great Britain – 4
  • Poland – 4
  • Sweden – 3
  • Belgium – 2
  • Denmark – 2
  • Netherlands – 2
  • Finland – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Spain – 1

References

OmegaTiming. 16th FINA World Championships Swimming Results. Access on August 9 2015.

Swimming: World Aquatics Championships Begin as Brazil, Italy and United States Qualify Three

France and the United States both won gold at the 10km open water events at the 2015 World Aquatics Championships. The World Aquatics Championships is one of the largest events for a single sport with an estimate 2500 athletes from 190 nations participating in 75 events across 6 disciplines (diving, high diving, open water, swimming, synchronized swimming and water polo). For the 10km open water events the top 10 ranked athletes of each gender qualify to the Olympics. The World Aquatics Championships are currently being held in Kazan, Russia from July 24th to August 9th 2015. The open water events were held from July 25th to August 1st 2015.

In the men’s 10km race it was Hungary’s Gergely Gyurta that led a large pack for the first two laps, however staying up front took its toll as by the third lap he was 23 seconds behind the leader, Jordan Wilimovsky of the United States and he would ultimately finish outside of an Olympic qualifying spot in 13th. Wilimovsky used the final lap to extend his lead over the entire field and finished 12 seconds ahead of his closest competitor with a time of 1:49:48.2. Ferry Weertman of the Netherlands won the silver with a time of 1:50:00.3 while Spyridon Gianniotis of Greece won the bronze with a time of 1:50:00.7.

The other athletes to gain an Olympic quota were Sean Ryan (United States), Jack Burnell (Great Britain), Marc-Antoine Olivier (France), Simone Ruffini (Italy), Richard Weinberger (Canada), Allan Do Carmo (Brazil) and Federico Vanelli (Italy).

In the women’s 10km race the top swimmers mostly kept close with each other with France’s Aurelie Muller taking the overall lead starting in the second lap. Going into the final lap Muller and Sharon van Rouwendaal of the Netherlands both increased their pace, leaving the rest of the field behind. In the end it was Muller who won gold by 2.4 seconds as she finished with a time of 1:58:04.3, van Rouwendaal finished with a time of 1:58:06.7. The bronze medal went to Ana Marcela Cunha of Brazil with a time of 1:58:26.5.

The other athlete to gain an Olympic quota were Rachele Bruni (Italy), Anastasia Krapivina (Russia), Poliana Okimoto (Brazil), Isabelle Harle (Germany), Kalliopi Araouzou (Greece), Haley Anderson (United States) Eva Risztov (Hungary).

In open water swimming athletes are qualified by name, not by nation. For athletes of nations which failed to qualify a quota they will get a second chance at the Olympic swim marathon qualifier to be held in 2016.

Quotas by Nation

  • Brazil – 3
  • Italy – 3
  • United States – 3
  • France – 2
  • Greece – 2
  • Netherlands – 2
  • Canada – 1
  • Germany – 1
  • Great Britain – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Russia – 1

References

OmegaTiming. 16th FINA World Championships – Open Water Results. Access on July 29 2015.