Judo: Olympic Rankings Published 113 Nations Qualify

113 nations qualified through the Judo Olympic Rankings. Athletes earned points through various world and continental events over a two year period. There were two methods of qualifying. First the top 22 men and top 14 women qualify with a maximum of one NOC per weight class. Second are the continental qualifiers. The highest ranked, not yet qualified athletes across all events can qualify. Each continent has a set amount of quotas; Africa 24 (14 men, 10 women), Europe 25 (14 men, 11 women), Asia 20 (12 men, 8 women), Oceania 10 (7 men, 3 women), and Pan America 21 (13 men, 8 women). A nation can only earn one spot across all events through this and a single continent can qualify a maximum of two athletes in a single event. The qualification period lasted from May 30th 2014 to May 29th 2016.

In total 113 nations have qualified with France and Japan joining hosts Brazil as being the only nation to have qualified a full team of men and women. Also qualifying a full men’s team are Georgia, Germany, Mongolia, Russia, South Korea and Uzbekistan. Overall 53 nations only qualified through the continental rankings while 14 nations did not receive a continental quota. Oceania did not allocate all 10 of its continental quotas thus the unused quota was reallocated to the athlete with the most points and is not yet qualified among all events, specifically Uzbekistan’s Soyib Kurbonov in the men’s -100kg.

The quotas are tied to the athletes by name with the exception of where multiple athletes from the same nation finished in the top 22 for men and top 14 for women where the nation can choose from among them. All that is left to determine in judo is the tripartite quotas.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • France – 14
  • Japan – 14
  • Germany – 13
  • Mongolia – 13
  • South Korea – 12
  • Netherlands – 11
  • Russia – 11
  • Cuba – 9
  • Canada – 8
  • China – 8
  • Georgia – 8
  • Hungary – 8
  • Uzbekistan – 8
  • Australia – 7
  • Great Britain – 7
  • Israel – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Azerbaijan – 6
  • Portugal – 6
  • United States – 6
  • Algeria – 5
  • Austria – 5
  • Belgium – 5
  • Egypt – 5
  • Italy – 5
  • Kazakhstan – 5
  • Slovenia – 5
  • Spain – 5
  • Poland – 4
  • Romania – 4
  • Sweden – 4
  • Tunisia – 4
  • Turkey – 4
  • Czech Republic – 3
  • Ecuador – 3
  • Iran – 3
  • Morocco – 3
  • North Korea – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • United Arab Emirates – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Belarus – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Chinese Taipei – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Gabon – 2
  • Greece – 2
  • Kosovo – 2
  • Kyrgyzstan – 2
  • Latvia – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • Puerto Rico – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Tajikistan – 2
  • Turkmenistan – 2
  • American Samoa – 1
  • Angola – 1
  • Armenia – 1
  • Aruba – 1
  • Benin – 1
  • Bolivia – 1
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – 1
  • Burkina Faso – 1
  • Cameroon – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Congo – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Côte d’Ivoire – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Dominican Republic – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Fiji – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Gambia – 1
  • Ghana – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Guinea-Bissau – 1
  • Haiti – 1
  • Honduras – 1
  • Iceland – 1
  • India – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Jordan – 1
  • Kenya – 1
  • Lebanon – 1
  • Libya – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Madagascar – 1
  • Mali – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Mozambique – 1
  • Nauru – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Niger – 1
  • Pakistan – 1
  • Palau – 1
  • Papua New Guinea – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Samoa – 1
  • Saudi Arabia – 1
  • Senegal – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Seychelles – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Trinidad and Tobago – 1
  • Uruguay – 1
  • Vanuatu – 1
  • Venezuela – 1
  • Vietnam – 1
  • Zambia – 1

 

References

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Rowing: Asian Regatta Updated and Tripartite Announced

World Rowing has updated its qualified nation list just before the final qualification regatta which is scheduled to commence in a week and a half. First from the Asian Qualification Regatta the nations which qualified two boats from the same gender have chosen the boat which they will participate in. South Korea chose to compete in the women’s single sculls while Vietnam has chosen to compete in the women’s lightweight double sculls. The quotas have since been reallocated to Thailand and Hong Kong in the single sculls and lightweight double sculls respectively.

World Rowing has also announced their tripartite quotas. The tripartite commission chooses nations which qualified an average of less than eight athletes in individual sports over the last two Olympics. Libya and Vanuatu were given quotas to compete in the men’s single sculls while Togo was given a spot to compete in the women’s single sculls. While there has been no official word it is likely that the final women’s single sculls tripartite quota will be reallocated to the final qualification regatta.

 

Boats by Nations

  • Hong Kong – 1
  • Libya – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Togo – 1
  • Vanuatu – 1

 

References

Badminton: Olympic Qualification Rankings Released

With the final update of the Olympic Badminton Rankings the initial lists of qualified athletes have been announced. The Olympic Badminton Rankings included tournaments such as the World Championships, Continental Championships, Grand Prixes and others. The ranking period for the Olympic Badminton Rankings were from May 5th 2015 to May 1st 2016.

The top 34 athletes in the single rankings qualified to the Olympics. However, there is a maximum of two athletes per nation if both athletes are in the top 16 in the overall rankings. If not the maximum quota for each nation is one. Also all five continents must be represented with the highest ranking athlete from the continent automatically qualifying. The tripartite quotas also count towards the continental representation.

For the doubles rankings the top 16 teams qualified to the Olympics. Similarly, there is a maximum of two teams per nation if both teams are in the top 8 in the overall rankings. If not the maximum quota for each nation is one team. Also all continents that have at least one team in the top 50 will be granted a spot to the Olympics.

Overall China qualified the most quotas, winning the maximum of two entrants in all five events. In addition Denmark, Germany, Great Britain, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea and the United States have at least one qualified entrant in all five events. In total, 41 nations have qualified at least one athlete.

There have been some reallocations due to the same athlete competing in two events. For the men China’s Zhang Nan, Germany’s Michael Fuchs and United States’ Phillip Chew have qualified in both the men’s doubles and mixed doubles. Brazil also qualified through the men’s singles releasing its host quota. These quotas will be reallocated to the men’s singles benefitting Portugal’s Pedro Martins, Austria’s David Obernorsterer, Canada’s Martin Giuffre and Czech Republic’s Petr Koukal.

Similarly China’s Zhao Yunlei, Denmark’s Christinna Pedersen and Netherlands’ Selena Piek qualified both in the women’s doubles and mixed doubles. These extra quotas will be reallocated to the women’s singles benefitting Switzerland’s Sabrina Jaquet, Ireland’s Chloe Magee and Portugal’s Telma Santos.

Also Australia will have to give up two of its continental quotas due to the rule allowing a nation to only benefit from a maximum of two continental quotas. The quotas will be reallocated to the next best eligible nation from Oceania first. If there are no eligible nations it will be reallocated to the next best ranked eligible nation regardless of continent.

Confirmation of quotas and tripartite invitations still remain so there will be a few changes between now and at the beginning of the Olympics, but for the most part the majority of athletes here will compete at the Olympics.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • China – 10
  • South Korea – 9
  • Denmark – 6
  • Indonesia – 6
  • Japan – 6
  • Germany – 5
  • Great Britain – 5
  • Hong Kong – 5
  • India – 5
  • Malaysia – 5
  • Thailand – 5
  • United States – 5
  • Australia – 4
  • Poland – 3
  • Russia – 3
  • Chinese Taipei – 3
  • Austria – 2
  • Belgium – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Canada – 2
  • Czech Republic – 2
  • France – 2
  • Ireland – 2
  • Netherlands – 2
  • Portugal – 2
  • Singapore – 2
  • Spain – 2
  • Ukraine – 2
  • Vietnam – 2
  • Cuba – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Italy – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • South Africa – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • Switzerland – 1
  • Turkey – 1

 

References

Weightlifting: Japan and Vietnam Top Olympic Rankings at Asian Championship

Japan and Vietnam led all nations in the team Olympic rankings at the 2016 Asian Weightlifting Championship. The team rankings are constructed by adding the points of the top 6 men or top 4 women of each nation which has yet to qualify to the Olympics. The top seven men’s teams and the top six women’s teams qualified 1 athlete each. The Asian Weightlifting Championship was held in Tashkent, Uzbekistan from April 22nd to April 30th 2016.

The women’s rankings was topped by Vietnam whom had four athletes finishing as the top ranked athlete from unqualified nations in their weight class thus earning the maximum of 112 points. Following Vietnam were Uzbekistan, India and Mongolia whom finished with 101, 100 and 96 points respectively. The Philippines led by Hidilyn Diaz in the -53kg event finished safely in fifth with a total of 91 points. The final spot came down to Turkmenistan and United Arab Emirates. Going into the final two events Turkmenistan’s Aysoltan Toychyyeva did enough in the -75kg to place her in the lead at 83 points. However, with two United Arab Emirates lifters in the +75kg Turkmenistan had to hope none of the expected competitors ranked above them fail to lift a weight. In the end everyone was able to lift a weight meaning United Arab Emirates narrowly missed out in finishing in the top six as they finished with 81 points.

The men’s ranking was topped by Japan whom sent a very strong team to finish with a total of 145 points. The team podium was filled with Iraq and Malaysia whom finished with a total of 142 and 137 points respectively. As each event went through it became apparent that five nations will be fighting for four spots. Disaster struck for Saudi Arabia in the -94kg event where won of their lifters failed to lift a weight. This was also their final athlete meaning at 121 points Saudi Arabia would have to sit and watch the final two events and hope a nation either underperforms or fails to lift a weight altogether. This did not happened meaning Saudi Arabia finished in eighth. The nations which did qualified were Kyrgyzstan (132 points), Syria (129 points), India (129 points) and Turkmenistan (125 points).

Note that these results are not final until all samples are tested for doping. Asian athletes will have only one more opportunity to qualify, through the world rankings. The three remaining continents will have their qualifiers over the next six weeks.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • India – 2
  • Turkmenistan – 2
  • Iraq – 1
  • Japan – 1
  • Kyrgyzstan – 1
  • Malaysia – 1
  • Mongolia – 1
  • Philippines – 1
  • Syria – 1
  • Uzbekistan – 1
  • Vietnam – 1

 

References

IWF. 2016 Asian Weightlifting Championship – Results. Access on April 30 2016.

Rowing: Asian and Oceania Regatta Concludes However Reallocations Still Needed

Asian and Oceania nations had the opportunity to qualify boats at the 2016 Asian and Oceania Olympic Qualification Regatta. The top seven boats in the single sculls and the top three boats in the lightweight double sculls qualify their nation to the Olympics. In addition a nation can only qualify one boat per gender. The Asian and Oceania Olympic Qualification Regatta was held in Chungju, South Korea from April 22nd to April 25th 2016.

The top two in the four heats of the men’s single sculls advanced to the A/B semi-final while all other boats advanced to the repechage. The fastest boat was Indonesia’s Memo who won heat 3 with a time of 6:46.26. In the two repechages the top two advanced to the A/B semi-final. Uzbekistan’s Shakhnoz Kholmurzaev finished with the fastest time of 7:12.84 winning repechage 1. South Korea’s Kim Dong Yong won the first A/B semi-final with a time of 7:18.74 while Kazakhstan’s Vladislav Yakovlev won the second A/B semi-final with a time of 7:14.38. India, Indonesia, Iraq and Thailand also advanced to the A Final and thus became the first six boats to qualify to the Olympics. Kim would win the overall title with a time of 7:05.13. In the B final Uzbekistan’s Shakhnoz Kholmurzaev grabbed the final quota with a time of 7:13.83.

The top two in the three heats in the women’s single sculls advanced to the A/B semi-final while all other boats advanced to the repechage. The fastest boat was Chinese Taipei’s Wang Ming-Hui who won heat 1 and finished with a time of 7:31.15. In the two repechages the top three advanced to the A/B semi-final. Singapore’s Saiyidah Mohamed Rafa’ee finished with the fasted time of 8:06.23, winning repechage 2. Wang had another good performance in the A/B semi-final as she won the first race with a time of 8:01.86. South Korea’s Kim Yeji won the second A/B semi-final with a time of 7:57.64. Indonesia, Iran, Kazakhstan and Vietnam also advanced to the A final and thus became the first six boats to qualify to the Olympics. Kim would win the overall title with a time of 7:44.52. In the B final Singapore’s Saiyidah Mohamed Rafa’ee grabbed the final quota with a time of 7:53.13.

The top ranked boat in the two heats of the men’s lightweight double sculls advanced to the A final while all other boats advanced to the repechage. The first heat was won by Japan whom finished with a time of 6:20.70 while the second heat was won by India whom finished with a time of 6:22.75. In the two repechages the top two advanced to the A final. The repechages were won by China and Hong Kong with a time of 6:37.50 and 6:37.17 respectively. Also advancing to the A final were Indonesia and Uzbekistan. In the A final China won the event with a time of 6:24.70. Japan and Hong Kong won silver and bronze respectively and also qualified to the Olympics.

The top two ranked boats in the two heats of the women’s lightweight double sculls advanced to the A final while all other boats advanced to the repechage. Japan and South Korea won their heats with a time of 7:05.95 and 7:09.35 respectively. Also advancing to the A final were Hong Kong and Iran. In the single repechage the top two advanced to the A final. The repechage was won by Vietnam whom finished ahead of Kazakhstan to finish with a time of 7:23.05. In the A final Japan won the event with a time of 7:03.19. South Korea and Vietnam won silver and bronze respectively and also qualified to the Olympics.

Since a nation can only qualify one boat per gender there will be a couple of reallocations in the women events. South Korea and Vietnam must now choose which event they will compete in causing the other boat to be reallocated. Depending on the choice we could see Thailand and Qatar win a quota in the single sculls, Hong Kong and Thailand win a quota in the lightweight double sculls or a combination of Thailand and Hong Kong winning a quota in the single sculls and lightweight double sculls respectively.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • South Korea – 3*
  • Indonesia – 2
  • Japan – 2
  • Kazakhstan – 2
  • Vietnam – 2*
  • China – 1
  • Hong Kong – 1
  • India – 1
  • Iran – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Singapore – 1
  • Chinese Taipei – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Uzbekistan – 1

* Must choose boat

 

References

Gymnastics: Test Event Decide Remaining Quotas

France and Germany qualified a full artistic team, Germany and Uzbekistan qualified both an individual and team in rhythmic gymnastics and Portugal and the United States qualified an athlete in both genders in trampoline at the 2016 Gymnastics Olympic Test Event. The Olympic test event featured all three disciplines in gymnastics. In artistic gymnastics the top four all-around teams will qualify along with eligible all-around individuals until the total quota of 97 men and 97 women have been met including continental representation. In trampoline eight quotas for each gender are available to the top eligible athletes, including continental representation. Two of these quotas are meant for the host Brazil and the tripartite though gender is not specified. In rhythmic gymnastics the top three all-around teams and the top nine all-around individuals, including continental representation will qualify. The Gymnastics Olympic Test Event was held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from April 16th to April 22nd 2016.

 

Artistic

In the men’s team all-around competition it was Germany whom led all nations with a score of 350.609. After a relatively weak floor performance the team posted top three results in all of the other apparatuses including a top performance in the parallel bars. Ukraine followed close behind with a final score of 350.160. The team had a good performance at the beginning including a very strong first place in the pommel horse, but ultimately lost pace to Germany. The other two nations which booked a team spot were the Netherlands who will compete in the men’s team event for the first time in its history and France. Inconsistencies including a horrible start on the pommel horse ultimately cost Spain a spot in the team event.

Nations which competed in the team event, but did not qualify are eligible to pick any athlete to compete at the Olympics. These nations are Romania, Spain, Belgium and Canada. Continental representation (1 for Oceania, 2 for other continents) was not met for Africa as only one athlete qualified through the test event. This meant the highest ranked African athlete from the 2015 World Championship, Algeria’s Mohamed Bourguieg qualified to the Olympics. Nations which had two athletes competing and both athletes finishing higher than the lowest ranked qualifier will have the opportunity to pick which one of the two athletes will compete. These nations are Colombia, Mexico and Hungary.

The following athletes are qualified to the Olympics based on the order from the individual all-around event; Andrey Likhovitskiy (Belarus), Alexander Shatilov (Isarael), Ferhat Arican (Turkey), Artur Davtyan (Armenia), Randy Leru (Cuba), Filip Ude (Croatia), Petro Pakhnyuk (Azerbaijan), Anton Fokin (Uzbekistan), Oskar Kirmes (Finland), Ludovico Edalli (Italy), Stian Skjerahaug (Norway), David Jessen (Czech Republic), Robert Tvorogal (Lithuania), Pham Phuoc Hung (Vietnam), Marios Georgiou (Cyprus), Kieran Behan (Ireland), Vlasios Maras (Greece), Gustavo Palma Simoes (Portugal), Mikhail Koudinoc (New Zealand), Ryan Patterson (South Africa), Tomas Gonzalez (Chile) and Lee Chih Kai (Chinese Taipei).

The women’s team all-around event was topped by Brazil whom finished with a score of 226.477. The team had a great performance, finishing first in the balance beam, floor and vault. Despite a poor performance on the uneven bars second place Germany was unable to close the gap completely, finishing with an overall score of 223.977. Also qualifying to the Olympics are Belgium and France. In one of the most shocking news in gymnastics Romania, medalists at every Olympics since 1976 will not be sending a team as a poor uneven bars contributed to their seventh place finish.

Nations which competed in the team event, but did not qualify are eligible to choose any athlete to compete at the Olympics. These nations are Australia, Switzerland, Romania and South Korea. Continental representation (1 for Oceania, 2 for the other continents) was not met for Africa as no athletes were qualified at the end of the test event. This meant the highest ranked African athletes from the 2015 World Championships, specifically; Algeria’s Farah Boufadene and South Africa’s Claudia Cummins have qualified to the Olympics. Nations which had two athletes competing and both athletes finishing higher than the lowest ranked qualifier will have the opportunity to pick which one of two athletes will compete. These nations are Greece, Hungary, Spain, Mexico and Poland.

The following athletes are qualified to the Olympics based on the order from the individual all-around event; Ana Sofia Gomez (Guatemala), Jessica Lopez Arocha (Venezuela), Angelina Kysla (Ukraine), Marcia Vidiaux (Cuba), Filipa Martins (Portugal), Lisa Ecker (Austria), Toni-Ann Williams (Jamaica), Irina Sazonova (Iceland), Phan Thu Ha Thanh (Vietnam), Dipa Karmakar (India), Barbora Mokosova (Slovakia), Courtney McGregor (New Zealand), Oksana Chusovitina (Uzbekistan), Houry Gebeshian (Armenia), Ariana Orrego (Peru), Simona Castro (Chile), Teja Belak (Slovenia), Tutya Yilmaz (Turkey), Emma Larsson (Sweden), Marisa Dick (Trinidad and Tobago), Ana Derek (Croatia), Catalina Escobar Gomez (Colombia), Kylie Dickson (Belarus), Ellis O’Reilly (Ireland) and Ailen Valente (Argentina).

 

Trampoline

The qualification round of the women’s trampoline was topped by Li Dan of China whom scored 102.480 after her two performances. In the final however, Li had a subpar performance and finished in fifth. The event was instead won by her compatriot Liu Lingling whom finished with a score of 55.485. China along with Belarus has already previously qualified to the Olympics while other nations were allowed to only qualify one athlete. The Olympic quotas went to Russia, Ukraine, Japan, Uzbekistan, Germany, Portugal and the United States. While the last spot is expected to go to a tripartite nation it will likely eventually be reallocated to the next best ranked nation, France.

Before the competition began Brazil declared that it will use its host quota on the men’s trampoline, leaving the men one fewer qualification spot. The qualification round of the men’s trampoline was topped by China’s Gao Lei whom scored 110.660 after his two performances. A mistake and a fall in the final cost Gao the event as he finished in eighth. The winner of the event was Belarus’ Uladzislau Hancharou whom finished with a score of 59.750. China along with Belarus has already previously qualified to the Olympics while other nations were allowed to only qualify one athlete. The Olympic quotas went to New Zealand, Portugal, United States, Great Britain, Australia, Canada and as mentioned before Brazil obtained a quota for being the host nation. While the last spot is currently reserved for a tripartite nation it could potentially be reallocation to the next best ranked nation, Kazakhstan.

 

Rhythmic

The qualification round of the individual all-around was led by Belarus’ Melitina Staniouta whom finished with the top score in all four rotations for a total of 72.215 points. However, Belarus has already qualified to the Olympics. The following athletes qualified to the Olympics; Sabina Ashirbayeva (Kazakhstan), Nicol Ruprecht (Austria), Veronica Berolini (Italy), Ekaterina Volkova (Finland), Anastasiya Serdyukova (Uzbekistan), Ana Luiza Filiorianu (Romania), Shang Rong (China) and Jana Berezko-Marggrander. Also since Oceania did not qualify an athlete Australia’s Danielle Prince has been given a continental quota. An African quota will be given either through the tripartite commission or through the best ranked athlete from the 2015 World Championships (South Africa). In addition Brazil announced that it will use its host quota on Natalia Gaudio. The final was again topped by Staniouta whom finished with a score of 70.749.

A direct final for the team all-around was held. Germany won the event by being the best team in the two rotations finishing with a score of 33.183. The other two Olympic quotas went to silver medalist Uzbekistan (32.832) and bronze medalist Greece (31.982).

This was the final opportunity for nations to qualify to the Olympics in gymnastics. All that is remaining is to decide on the tripartite places. Overall China and Russia will be sending the largest teams with 20 athletes each while Japan and the United States will also compete in all of the events.

 

Athletes by Nations

  • Germany – 16
  • France – 10
  • Uzbekistan – 9
  • Greece – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Belgium – 6
  • Brazil – 5
  • Netherlands – 5
  • Portugal – 4
  • Australia – 3
  • New Zealand – 3
  • Romania – 3
  • Algeria – 2
  • Armenia – 2
  • Austria – 2
  • Belarus – 2
  • Canada – 2
  • Chile – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Croatia – 2
  • Cuba – 2
  • Finland – 2
  • Hungary – 2
  • Ireland – 2
  • Italy – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Spain – 2
  • Turkey – 2
  • United States – 2
  • Vietnam – 2
  • Argentina – 1
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • China – 1
  • Chinese Taipei – 1
  • Cyprus – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Great Britain – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Iceland – 1
  • India – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Jamaica – 1
  • Japan – 1
  • Kazakhstan – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Poland – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Slovakia – 1
  • Slovenia – 1
  • South Korea – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • Switzerland – 1
  • Trinidad and Tobago – 1
  • Venezuela – 1

 

References

Fencing: Nations Qualify After Olympic Asia-Oceania Zonal Tournament

Six nations qualified at least one athlete at the 2016 Asia-Oceania Fencing Olympic Zonal Tournament. Nations which have not qualified an athlete in the specific event were eligible to participate. The top ranked athlete in events with a team event (men’s epee, men’s foil, women’s epee, women’s sabre) qualified to the Olympics while the top three athletes in events with no team event (men’s sabre, women’s foil) qualified to the Olympics. The Asia-Oceania Olympic Zonal Tournament was held in Wuxi, China from April 11th to April 12th 2016.

The final of the women’s epee was between Vietnam’s Nguyen Thi Nhu Hoa and Kazakhstan’s Ulyana Balaganskaya after they defeated Singapore’s Chialing Chang 8-7 and Australia’s Joanna Hall 14-13 respectively. Nguyen won the tournament and qualified to the Olympics with a 15-5 victory over Balaganskaya.

The first two athletes to qualify in the men’s sabre were Vietnam’s Vu Thanh An and Kazakhstan’s Ilya Mokretcov whom defeated Kuwait’s Yousef Alshamlan and Japan’s Kenta Tokunan respectively. Tokunan won the third place match to grab the final quota.

Japan’s Shiho Nishioka and New Zealand’s Ping Yuan were the first to qualify in the women’s foil after defeating Hong Kong’s Lin Po Heung and Vietnam’s Do Thi Anh respectively. Lin won the third place match to grab the final quota.

In the women’s sabre Vietnam’s Nguyen Thi Le Dung defeated Au Sin Ying of Hong Kong 15-10 to reach the finals. In the other semi-final it was Tiffany Dellaquila of Chinese Taipei whom defeated Singapore’s Ann Huimin Lee 15-13. Nguyen won the final and the Olympic quota by defeated Dellaquila 15-11.

The final in the men’s foil was between Hong Kong’s Cheung Ka Long and Chinese Taipei’s Ou Feng Meng as they defeated Kuwait’s Yaser Mohamad 15-10 and Iran’s Alireza Adhami 15-11. Cheung won the tournament and Olympic quota by defeating Ou 15-4.

The semi-final of the men’s epee saw Kuwait’s Abdulaziz Alshatti defeat Chinese Taipei’s Chen Tsung Lin 15-8 and Uzbekistan’s Ruslan Kudayev defeat Kyrgyzstan’s Alexander Chernykh 15-14. Alshatti won the final over Kudayev 15-12 to qualify to the Olympics. As a reminder Kuwait is currently suspended by the IOC. Should they remain suspended during the Olympics Kuwait’s athletes will participate under the Olympic flag.

This was the final opportunity for Asia-Oceania nations to qualify in fencing. The remaining zonal qualifications are expected to be completed over the next week.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Vietnam – 3
  • Hong Kong – 2
  • Japan – 2
  • Kazakhstan – 1
  • Kuwait – 1
  • New Zealand – 1

 

References