Boxing: 29 Nations Qualify After World Qualification Tournament

29 nations qualified at least one athlete after the 2016 Boxing World Olympic Qualification Tournament. One quota was available in the heavyweight and super heavyweight, two quotas were available in the men’s light flyweight and five quotas were available in the other seven events. In the events with five quotas the quarter-finalist whom lost to the eventual winner qualified as the fifth best athlete. The AIBA World Olympic Qualification Tournament was held in Baku, Azerbaijan from June 16th to June 25th 2016.

Overall nine nations won a gold medal among the ten events. The only nation which won two gold medals was Azerbaijan whom won gold in the light flyweight (-49kg) and light heavyweight (-81kg). In the light flyweight Rufat Huseynov defeated Spain’s Samuel Carmona in the final. In the light heavyweight 2012 Olympic bronze medalist Teymur Mammadov defeated Germany’s Serge Michel in the final. Also qualifying were Russia’s Petr Khamukov, Belarus’ Mikhail Dauhaliavets and Morocco’s Hassan Saada. Azerbaijan also qualified a third athlete in the middleweight (-75kg) where Kamran Shakhsuvarly lost to the eventual gold medalist Michael O’Reilly of Ireland whom defeated Turkmenistan’s Arslanbek Achilov in the final. Also qualifying in the middleweight are Iraq’s Waheed Abdul-Ridha and India’s Vikas Yadav.

The only other nation to have qualified three athletes from this event was France. Souleymane Cissokho defeated Hungary’s Imre Bacskai to win the welterweight (-69kg). Also qualifying were Belarus’ Pavel Kastramin, Great Britain’s Josh Kelly and Bulgaria’s Simeon Chamov. The other two French athletes which qualified were Elie Konki in the flyweight (-52kg) and Hassan Amzile in the light welterweight (-64kg). The flyweight was won by Bulgaria’s Daniel Asenov whom defeated United States’ Antonio Vargas. Also qualifying were Turkey’s Selcuk Eker and Mongolia’s Kharkhuugiin Enkh-Amar. The light welterweight was won by Great Britain’s Pat McCormack whom defeated Haiti’s Richardson Hitchins. Also qualifying were United States’ Gary Russell and India’s Monoj Kumar.

The bantamweight (-56kg) was won by 2013 World Championship bronze medalist Mykola Butsenko of Ukraine whom defeated Mongolia’s Erdenebatyn Tsendbaatar. Also qualifying were Cuba’s Robeisy Ramirez, Japan’s Arashi Morisaka and Algeria’s Fahem Hammachi. Netherlands’ Enrico Lacruz defeated Tajikistan’s Anvar Yunusov in the final of the lightweight (-60kg) event. Also qualifying are China’s Shan Jun, Chinese Taipei’s Lai Chun-En and Qatar’s Hakan Erseker. The lone quotas for the heavyweight (-90kg) and super heavyweight (+90kg) went to Poland’s Igor Jakubowski and Italy’s Guido Vianello respectively.

There will be one more opportunity for male boxers to qualify to the Olympics, the APB and WSB qualifier which will allow professional boxers to qualify, provided a nation has not already qualified in that event.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Azerbaijan – 3
  • France – 3
  • Belarus – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Germany – 2
  • India – 2
  • Mongolia – 2
  • United States – 2
  • Algeria – 1
  • China – 1
  • Chinese Taipei – 1
  • Cuba – 1
  • Great Britain – 1
  • Haiti – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Ireland – 1
  • Italy – 1
  • Japan – 1
  • Morocco – 1
  • Netherlands – 1
  • Poland – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Spain – 1
  • Tajikistan – 1
  • Turkey – 1
  • Turkmenistan – 1
  • Ukraine – 1

 

References

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Judo: Olympic Rankings Published 113 Nations Qualify

113 nations qualified through the Judo Olympic Rankings. Athletes earned points through various world and continental events over a two year period. There were two methods of qualifying. First the top 22 men and top 14 women qualify with a maximum of one NOC per weight class. Second are the continental qualifiers. The highest ranked, not yet qualified athletes across all events can qualify. Each continent has a set amount of quotas; Africa 24 (14 men, 10 women), Europe 25 (14 men, 11 women), Asia 20 (12 men, 8 women), Oceania 10 (7 men, 3 women), and Pan America 21 (13 men, 8 women). A nation can only earn one spot across all events through this and a single continent can qualify a maximum of two athletes in a single event. The qualification period lasted from May 30th 2014 to May 29th 2016.

In total 113 nations have qualified with France and Japan joining hosts Brazil as being the only nation to have qualified a full team of men and women. Also qualifying a full men’s team are Georgia, Germany, Mongolia, Russia, South Korea and Uzbekistan. Overall 53 nations only qualified through the continental rankings while 14 nations did not receive a continental quota. Oceania did not allocate all 10 of its continental quotas thus the unused quota was reallocated to the athlete with the most points and is not yet qualified among all events, specifically Uzbekistan’s Soyib Kurbonov in the men’s -100kg.

The quotas are tied to the athletes by name with the exception of where multiple athletes from the same nation finished in the top 22 for men and top 14 for women where the nation can choose from among them. All that is left to determine in judo is the tripartite quotas.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • France – 14
  • Japan – 14
  • Germany – 13
  • Mongolia – 13
  • South Korea – 12
  • Netherlands – 11
  • Russia – 11
  • Cuba – 9
  • Canada – 8
  • China – 8
  • Georgia – 8
  • Hungary – 8
  • Uzbekistan – 8
  • Australia – 7
  • Great Britain – 7
  • Israel – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Azerbaijan – 6
  • Portugal – 6
  • United States – 6
  • Algeria – 5
  • Austria – 5
  • Belgium – 5
  • Egypt – 5
  • Italy – 5
  • Kazakhstan – 5
  • Slovenia – 5
  • Spain – 5
  • Poland – 4
  • Romania – 4
  • Sweden – 4
  • Tunisia – 4
  • Turkey – 4
  • Czech Republic – 3
  • Ecuador – 3
  • Iran – 3
  • Morocco – 3
  • North Korea – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • United Arab Emirates – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Belarus – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Chinese Taipei – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Gabon – 2
  • Greece – 2
  • Kosovo – 2
  • Kyrgyzstan – 2
  • Latvia – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • Puerto Rico – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Tajikistan – 2
  • Turkmenistan – 2
  • American Samoa – 1
  • Angola – 1
  • Armenia – 1
  • Aruba – 1
  • Benin – 1
  • Bolivia – 1
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – 1
  • Burkina Faso – 1
  • Cameroon – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Congo – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Côte d’Ivoire – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Dominican Republic – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Fiji – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Gambia – 1
  • Ghana – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Guinea-Bissau – 1
  • Haiti – 1
  • Honduras – 1
  • Iceland – 1
  • India – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Jordan – 1
  • Kenya – 1
  • Lebanon – 1
  • Libya – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Madagascar – 1
  • Mali – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Mozambique – 1
  • Nauru – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Niger – 1
  • Pakistan – 1
  • Palau – 1
  • Papua New Guinea – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Samoa – 1
  • Saudi Arabia – 1
  • Senegal – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Seychelles – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Trinidad and Tobago – 1
  • Uruguay – 1
  • Vanuatu – 1
  • Venezuela – 1
  • Vietnam – 1
  • Zambia – 1

 

References

Weightlifting: African Nations Qualify After Continental Championship

African nations booked their spot to the Olympics with the conclusion of the 2016 African Weightlifting Championship. The six highest ranking men and the four highest ranking women from nations not yet qualified earned points towards their nation’s ranking. The top five nations in the men and the top four nations in the women in the rankings qualified one athlete to the Olympics. The African Weightlifting Championship was held in Yaounde, Cameroon from May 7th to May 13th 2016.

In the women’s events it was Nigeria which showed its strength by winning four gold medals in the -58kg, -63kg, -75kg and +75kg events to finish with a maximum total of 112 points. Tunisia followed in second place with a gold medal in the -53kg and multiple silver medals, ending with a total of 103 points. Cameroon finished in third with 94 points while Algeria rounded out the quotas in fourth place with 93 points.

Several registered athletes and even nations failed to appear in the men’s events leading to only five nations sending at least six athletes meaning should they all finish with a lift they were all guaranteed an Olympic quota. The event was topped by Algeria and Tunisia whom both finished with 159 points as they both finished on top in the list of eligible nations in three events and runner-up in three others. A strong performance by Cameroon had the team finish with 144 points while Morocco and Ghana rounded out the top five with 133 and 122 points respectively.

Unqualified nations could still potentially qualify to the Olympics through the individual world rankings through currently no one is in the top 15 for men or 10 for women in the rankings, a prerequisite for qualifying to the Olympics. Two more continental qualifiers remain with Oceania scheduled for the end of this month.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Algeria – 2
  • Cameroon – 2
  • Tunisia – 2
  • Ghana – 1
  • Morocco – 1
  • Nigeria – 1

 

References

Gymnastics: Test Event Decide Remaining Quotas

France and Germany qualified a full artistic team, Germany and Uzbekistan qualified both an individual and team in rhythmic gymnastics and Portugal and the United States qualified an athlete in both genders in trampoline at the 2016 Gymnastics Olympic Test Event. The Olympic test event featured all three disciplines in gymnastics. In artistic gymnastics the top four all-around teams will qualify along with eligible all-around individuals until the total quota of 97 men and 97 women have been met including continental representation. In trampoline eight quotas for each gender are available to the top eligible athletes, including continental representation. Two of these quotas are meant for the host Brazil and the tripartite though gender is not specified. In rhythmic gymnastics the top three all-around teams and the top nine all-around individuals, including continental representation will qualify. The Gymnastics Olympic Test Event was held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from April 16th to April 22nd 2016.

 

Artistic

In the men’s team all-around competition it was Germany whom led all nations with a score of 350.609. After a relatively weak floor performance the team posted top three results in all of the other apparatuses including a top performance in the parallel bars. Ukraine followed close behind with a final score of 350.160. The team had a good performance at the beginning including a very strong first place in the pommel horse, but ultimately lost pace to Germany. The other two nations which booked a team spot were the Netherlands who will compete in the men’s team event for the first time in its history and France. Inconsistencies including a horrible start on the pommel horse ultimately cost Spain a spot in the team event.

Nations which competed in the team event, but did not qualify are eligible to pick any athlete to compete at the Olympics. These nations are Romania, Spain, Belgium and Canada. Continental representation (1 for Oceania, 2 for other continents) was not met for Africa as only one athlete qualified through the test event. This meant the highest ranked African athlete from the 2015 World Championship, Algeria’s Mohamed Bourguieg qualified to the Olympics. Nations which had two athletes competing and both athletes finishing higher than the lowest ranked qualifier will have the opportunity to pick which one of the two athletes will compete. These nations are Colombia, Mexico and Hungary.

The following athletes are qualified to the Olympics based on the order from the individual all-around event; Andrey Likhovitskiy (Belarus), Alexander Shatilov (Isarael), Ferhat Arican (Turkey), Artur Davtyan (Armenia), Randy Leru (Cuba), Filip Ude (Croatia), Petro Pakhnyuk (Azerbaijan), Anton Fokin (Uzbekistan), Oskar Kirmes (Finland), Ludovico Edalli (Italy), Stian Skjerahaug (Norway), David Jessen (Czech Republic), Robert Tvorogal (Lithuania), Pham Phuoc Hung (Vietnam), Marios Georgiou (Cyprus), Kieran Behan (Ireland), Vlasios Maras (Greece), Gustavo Palma Simoes (Portugal), Mikhail Koudinoc (New Zealand), Ryan Patterson (South Africa), Tomas Gonzalez (Chile) and Lee Chih Kai (Chinese Taipei).

The women’s team all-around event was topped by Brazil whom finished with a score of 226.477. The team had a great performance, finishing first in the balance beam, floor and vault. Despite a poor performance on the uneven bars second place Germany was unable to close the gap completely, finishing with an overall score of 223.977. Also qualifying to the Olympics are Belgium and France. In one of the most shocking news in gymnastics Romania, medalists at every Olympics since 1976 will not be sending a team as a poor uneven bars contributed to their seventh place finish.

Nations which competed in the team event, but did not qualify are eligible to choose any athlete to compete at the Olympics. These nations are Australia, Switzerland, Romania and South Korea. Continental representation (1 for Oceania, 2 for the other continents) was not met for Africa as no athletes were qualified at the end of the test event. This meant the highest ranked African athletes from the 2015 World Championships, specifically; Algeria’s Farah Boufadene and South Africa’s Claudia Cummins have qualified to the Olympics. Nations which had two athletes competing and both athletes finishing higher than the lowest ranked qualifier will have the opportunity to pick which one of two athletes will compete. These nations are Greece, Hungary, Spain, Mexico and Poland.

The following athletes are qualified to the Olympics based on the order from the individual all-around event; Ana Sofia Gomez (Guatemala), Jessica Lopez Arocha (Venezuela), Angelina Kysla (Ukraine), Marcia Vidiaux (Cuba), Filipa Martins (Portugal), Lisa Ecker (Austria), Toni-Ann Williams (Jamaica), Irina Sazonova (Iceland), Phan Thu Ha Thanh (Vietnam), Dipa Karmakar (India), Barbora Mokosova (Slovakia), Courtney McGregor (New Zealand), Oksana Chusovitina (Uzbekistan), Houry Gebeshian (Armenia), Ariana Orrego (Peru), Simona Castro (Chile), Teja Belak (Slovenia), Tutya Yilmaz (Turkey), Emma Larsson (Sweden), Marisa Dick (Trinidad and Tobago), Ana Derek (Croatia), Catalina Escobar Gomez (Colombia), Kylie Dickson (Belarus), Ellis O’Reilly (Ireland) and Ailen Valente (Argentina).

 

Trampoline

The qualification round of the women’s trampoline was topped by Li Dan of China whom scored 102.480 after her two performances. In the final however, Li had a subpar performance and finished in fifth. The event was instead won by her compatriot Liu Lingling whom finished with a score of 55.485. China along with Belarus has already previously qualified to the Olympics while other nations were allowed to only qualify one athlete. The Olympic quotas went to Russia, Ukraine, Japan, Uzbekistan, Germany, Portugal and the United States. While the last spot is expected to go to a tripartite nation it will likely eventually be reallocated to the next best ranked nation, France.

Before the competition began Brazil declared that it will use its host quota on the men’s trampoline, leaving the men one fewer qualification spot. The qualification round of the men’s trampoline was topped by China’s Gao Lei whom scored 110.660 after his two performances. A mistake and a fall in the final cost Gao the event as he finished in eighth. The winner of the event was Belarus’ Uladzislau Hancharou whom finished with a score of 59.750. China along with Belarus has already previously qualified to the Olympics while other nations were allowed to only qualify one athlete. The Olympic quotas went to New Zealand, Portugal, United States, Great Britain, Australia, Canada and as mentioned before Brazil obtained a quota for being the host nation. While the last spot is currently reserved for a tripartite nation it could potentially be reallocation to the next best ranked nation, Kazakhstan.

 

Rhythmic

The qualification round of the individual all-around was led by Belarus’ Melitina Staniouta whom finished with the top score in all four rotations for a total of 72.215 points. However, Belarus has already qualified to the Olympics. The following athletes qualified to the Olympics; Sabina Ashirbayeva (Kazakhstan), Nicol Ruprecht (Austria), Veronica Berolini (Italy), Ekaterina Volkova (Finland), Anastasiya Serdyukova (Uzbekistan), Ana Luiza Filiorianu (Romania), Shang Rong (China) and Jana Berezko-Marggrander. Also since Oceania did not qualify an athlete Australia’s Danielle Prince has been given a continental quota. An African quota will be given either through the tripartite commission or through the best ranked athlete from the 2015 World Championships (South Africa). In addition Brazil announced that it will use its host quota on Natalia Gaudio. The final was again topped by Staniouta whom finished with a score of 70.749.

A direct final for the team all-around was held. Germany won the event by being the best team in the two rotations finishing with a score of 33.183. The other two Olympic quotas went to silver medalist Uzbekistan (32.832) and bronze medalist Greece (31.982).

This was the final opportunity for nations to qualify to the Olympics in gymnastics. All that is remaining is to decide on the tripartite places. Overall China and Russia will be sending the largest teams with 20 athletes each while Japan and the United States will also compete in all of the events.

 

Athletes by Nations

  • Germany – 16
  • France – 10
  • Uzbekistan – 9
  • Greece – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Belgium – 6
  • Brazil – 5
  • Netherlands – 5
  • Portugal – 4
  • Australia – 3
  • New Zealand – 3
  • Romania – 3
  • Algeria – 2
  • Armenia – 2
  • Austria – 2
  • Belarus – 2
  • Canada – 2
  • Chile – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Croatia – 2
  • Cuba – 2
  • Finland – 2
  • Hungary – 2
  • Ireland – 2
  • Italy – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Spain – 2
  • Turkey – 2
  • United States – 2
  • Vietnam – 2
  • Argentina – 1
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • China – 1
  • Chinese Taipei – 1
  • Cyprus – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Great Britain – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Iceland – 1
  • India – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Jamaica – 1
  • Japan – 1
  • Kazakhstan – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Poland – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Slovakia – 1
  • Slovenia – 1
  • South Korea – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • Switzerland – 1
  • Trinidad and Tobago – 1
  • Venezuela – 1

 

References

Fencing: Adjusted Official Rankings and Olympic Quotas Published

33 nations have qualified at least one fencer after the publication of the 2015-16 Fencing Adjusted Official Rankings. For weapons with a team event (men’s epee, men’s foil, women’s epee and women’s sabre) the highest four ranked teams qualified three athletes along with the top ranked team from each continent provided that they are ranked from 5th to 16th in the world. Furthermore, seven athletes (2 from Europe, 2 from Asia-Oceania, 2 from Americas and 1 from Africa) from nations not qualified in the team events will be given a spot to compete with a maximum of one per nation. For the weapons without a team event (men’s sabre and women’s foil) the top 14 ranked athletes, with a maximum of two per nation qualify to the Olympics along with eight, two per continent highest ranked athletes with a maximum of one per nation. The rolling rankings included points awarded to athletes based on the various results such as World Cup, Grand Prix, World Championship and Continental Championships held between April 3rd 2015 and April 4th 2016.

France topped the men’s epee team ranking with Ukraine, Italy and Switzerland making up the top four. Russia, South Korea and Venezuela made up the continental teams. Egypt failed to finish in the top 16 thus Africa’s spot went to the next highest ranked nation, Hungary. Three athletes from the mentioned teams will compete in the individual epee along with Bas Verwijlen (Netherlands), Jiao Yunlong (China), Nikolai Novosjolv (Estonia), Alexandre Bouzaid (Senegal), Jason Pryor (United States) and Maxime Brinck-Croteau (Canada).

In the women’s epee team ranking the list was topped by Romania with China, Russia and Estonia making up the top four. South Korea, United States and Ukraine made up the continental teams. South Africa failed to finish in the top 16 thus Africa’s spot went to the next highest ranked nation, France. Three athletes from the mentioned teams will compete in the individual epee along with Rossella Fiamingo (Italy), Sarra Besbes (Tunisia), Emese Szasz (Hungary), Nathalie Moellhausen (Brazil), Nozomi Sato (Japan), Vivian Kong (Hong Kong) and Leonora MacKinnon (Canada).

The men’s foil team rankings were topped by Russia with Italy, France and the United States rounding up the top four. China, Great Britain, Egypt and Brazil made up the continental teams. Three athletes from the mention teams will compete in the individual foil along with Yuki Ota (Japan), Heo Jun (South Korea), Peter Joppich (Germany), Alexander Choupenitch (Czech Republics), Mohamed Ferjani (Tunisia), Maximilien van Haaster (Canada) and Daniel Gomez (Mexico).

The top 14 women in the individual foil with a maximum of two athletes per nation were as follows; Arianna Errigo (Italy), Inna Deriglazova (Russia), Elisa Di Francisca (Italy), Lee Kiefer (United States), Aida Shanaeva (Russia), Ysaora Thibus (France), Ines Boubakri (Tunisia), Nzingha Prescod (United States), Jeon Hee Sook (South Korea), Nam Hyunhee (South Korea), Astrid Guyart (France), Aida Mohamed (Hungary), Le Huilin (China) and Carolin Golubytskyi (Germany). The athletes which qualified as the two best from their continents were as follows; Edina Knapek (Hungary), Eleanor Harvey (Canada), Saskia van Erven Garcia (Colombia), Noura Mohamed (Egypt), Anissa Khelfaoui (Algeria) and Mona Shaito (Lebanon).

The top 14 men in the individual sabre with a maximum of two athletes per nation were as follows; Alexey Yakimenko (Russia), Gu Bongil (South Korea), Aron Szilagyi (Hungary), Tiberiu Dolniceanu (Romania), Kim Junghwan (South Korea), Max Hartung (Germany), Aldo Montano (Italy), Eli Dershwitz (United States), Nikolay Kovalev (Russia), Daryl Homer (United States), Mojtaba Abedini (Iran), Diego Occhiuzzi (Italy), Matyas Szabo (Germany) and Aliaksandr Buikevich (Belarus). The athletes which qualified as the two best from their continents were as follows; Vincent Anstett (France), Renzo Agresta (Brazil), Joseph Polossifakis (Canada), Tamas Decsi (Hungary), Ali Pakdaman (Iran), Mohamed Amer (Egypt), Yemi Apithy (Benin) and Sun Wei (China).

The women’s sabre team rankings were topped by Russia with Ukraine, France and the United States making up the top four. South Korea, Italy and Mexico made up the continental teams. Tunisia failed to finish in the top 16 thus Africa’s spot went to the next highest ranked nation, Poland. Three athletes from the mention teams will compete in the individual sabre along with Shen Chen (China), Anna Marton (Hungary), Vassiliki Vougiouka (Greece), Azza Besbes (Tunisia), Chika Aoki (Japan), Alejandra Benitez Romero (Venezuela) and Maria Perez Maurice (Argentina).

Overall Russia will be sending a full team while France will be competing in all of the events. China, Italy, South Korea and the United States will be competing in at least all of the individual events. The zonal tournaments which will be held in the coming weeks will decide the final athletes to compete in fencing at the Olympics.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Russia – 16
  • France – 15
  • Italy – 14
  • South Korea – 14
  • United States – 14
  • China – 11
  • Hungary – 9
  • Ukraine – 9
  • Brazil – 5
  • Canada – 5
  • Egypt – 5
  • Estonia – 4
  • Germany – 4
  • Japan – 4
  • Mexico – 4
  • Poland – 4
  • Romania – 4
  • Tunisia – 4
  • Venezuela – 4
  • Great Britain – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • Iran – 2
  • Algeria – 1
  • Argentina – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Benin – 1
  • Colombia – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Greece – 1
  • Hong Kong – 1
  • Lebanon – 1
  • Netherlands – 1
  • Senegal – 1

 

References

Wrestling: African/Oceania Tournament Concludes With 9 Qualified Nations

Nine nations qualified to the Olympics after the 2016 African and Oceania Wrestling Olympic Qualification Tournament. The top two nations from each event were given a spot to compete at the Olympics. The African and Oceania Wrestling Olympic Qualification Tournament was held in Algiers, Algeria from April 1st to April 3rd 2016.

Egypt was the top nation in the Greco-Roman events as they qualified in all six events, winning in five. The only blemish from their record was Morocco’s Zied Ait Ouagram’s victory over Egypt’s Mahmoud Sebie. Morocco also qualified a second athlete in the -59kg via El Mahadi Messaoudi. Second place finishes in the -85kg and -98kg events will assure Algeria two quotas while second place finishes in the -66kg and -130kg from Australia will ensure Oceania will have some representation in wrestling.

In the women’s freestyle events it was Nigeria which came away with the most quotas, winning four. The team will be made up of 2014 Commonwealth Games gold medalist Aminat Adeniyi in the -58kg, 2015 All-African Games gold medalists Mercy Genesis in the -48kg and Blessing Oborududu in the -63kg and 2015 All-African Games silver medalist Hannah Rueben in the -69kg. Cameroon qualified three athletes, headlined by 2014 Commonwealth Games silver medalist Annabelle Ali who will compete in her third Olympics. She will be joined by 2014 Commonwealth Games bronze medalist Rebecca Muambo in the -48kg and Joseph Essombe in the -53kg. Tunisia qualified two athletes in the -58kg and -63kg while Egypt qualified two athletes in the -69kg and -75kg. Senegal’s Isabelle Sambou rounds out the field by qualifying in the -53kg.

In the men’s freestyle events Egypt and Nigeria won two gold medals each. Egypt’s Mohamed Zaghloul defeated Tunisia’s Mohamed Saadaoui in the -86kg and his compatriot, Diaaeldin Kamal defeated Tunisia’s SlimTrabelsi in the -125kg. Nigeria’s Amas Daniel defeated Australia’s Sahit Prizreni in the -65kg and his compatriot, Soso Tamarau defeated Egypt’s Aly Hamdy Amin in the -97kg. In the other events Senegal’s Adama Diatta defeated Morocco’s Chakir Ansari in the -57kg and Guinea-Bissau’s Augusto Midina defeated Australia’s Talgat Ilyasov in the -74kg.

Athletes from Africa and Oceania not yet qualified will have two more opportunities to qualify to the Olympics at the final Olympic qualification tournaments.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Egypt – 11
  • Nigeria – 6
  • Australia – 4
  • Tunisia – 4
  • Cameroon – 3
  • Morocco – 3
  • Algeria – 2
  • Senegal – 2
  • Guinea-Bissau – 1

 

References

Boxing: 13 Nations Qualify After African Championship

13 nations qualified at least one athlete at the 2016 African Boxing Olympic Qualification Tournament. The three highest ranked male boxers along with the highest ranked female boxer qualified to the Olympics. The African Boxing Olympic Qualification Tournament was held in Yaounde, Cameroon from March 11th to March 19th 2016.

Overall 181 athletes from 30 nations competed in 10 men’s and 3 women’s weight classes. The first day of finals saw the result of six men’s events. Cameroon and Morocco led the day by qualifying in three events each. Cameroon won the gold medal in the men’s light flyweight (-49kg) and middleweight (-75kg) also 2008 Olympian Mahaman Smaila will return to the Olympics in the men’s light welterweight (-64kg). Despite not winning events on the first day of finals Morocco qualified in the men’s bantamweight (-56kg), light welterweight and middleweight. Tunisia won the men’s bantamweight and qualified in the men’s heavyweight (-91kg), Namibia won the men’s lightwelterweight and qualified in the light flyweight, Algeria won the men’s light heavyweight (-81kg) and qualified in the heavyweight and Mauritius won the men’s heavyweight and qualified in the middleweight. Other qualifiers included Egypt in the light heavyweight, Lesotho in the bantamweight, South Africa in the light flyweight and Uganda in the light heavyweight.

Morocco swept the women’s events by winning gold in all three events and claiming the three quotas. In the women’s flyweight (-51kg) Zohra Ez-Zahraoui defeated Nigeria’s Caroline Linus, in the lightweight (-60kg) Hasnaa Lachgar defeated Tunisia’s Hlimi Khouloud and in the middleweight (-75kg) Khadija El Mardi defeated Cameroon’s Azangue Yannicke.

On the second day of finals for men Algeria was the big winner for Olympic quotas despite not winning an event. Algeria qualified in the men’s flyweight (-52kg) with 2015 World Championship bronze medalist Mohamed Flissi, the lightweight (-60kg) and the welterweight (-69kg). Egypt won gold in the lightweight and also qualified in the welterweight. The other gold medalists were Kenya in the welterweight, Nigeria in the super heavyweight (+91kg) and South Africa in the flyweight. Other nations which qualified to the Olympics included Morocco in the super heavyweight, Seychelles in the lightweight, Tunisia in the super heavyweight and Uganda in the flyweight.

As a reminder South Africa has a policy of not accepting quotas won at the continental level, therefore should they decline the quotas they would be reallocated to Kenya in the light flyweight and Lesotho in the flyweight. There are still a few more opportunities for African nations to qualify their athletes to the Olympics.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Morocco – 7
  • Algeria – 5
  • Cameroon – 3
  • Egypt – 3
  • Tunisia – 3
  • Mauritius – 2
  • Namibia – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Uganda – 2
  • Kenya – 1
  • Lesotho – 1
  • Nigeria – 1
  • Seychelles – 1

 

References