Athletics: Relay Nations Qualified By Aggregate Times Revealed

The final relays in athletics have been revealed by the IAAF. Of the nations which have yet to qualify, they are ranked by the aggregate times of their best two performances over the qualification period. The top eight nations from each relay event qualify to the Olympics. The relay times can only be performed in approved events ranging from May 1st 2015 to June 11th 2016.

For the men’s relays the nations which qualified in the 4x100m are China, Canada, Antigua and Barbuda, Great Britain, Netherlands, Turkey, Dominican Republic and Cuba. The nations which qualified in the 4x400m are Cuba, France, Russia, Dominican Republic, Poland, Colombia, India and Venezuela.

For the women’s relays the nations which qualified in the 4x100m are Netherlands, Germany, Ukraine, China, Kazakhstan, Russia, France and Ghana. The nations which qualified in the 4x400m are Nigeria, Russia, Ukraine, Italy, Germany, India, Romania and Netherlands.

While Russia is listed in the rankings their participation is conditional on the CAS ruling. Should Russia remain banned in athletics the relays will be reallocated to the next highest ranked nation, specifically Japan (men’s 4x400m), Poland (women’s 4x100m) and Bahamas (women’s 4x400m).

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Netherlands – 3
  • Russia – 3
  • China – 2
  • Cuba – 2
  • Dominican Republic – 2
  • France – 2
  • Germany – 2
  • India – 2
  • Ukraine -2
  • Antigua and Barbuda – 1
  • Canada – 1
  • Colombia – 1
  • Ghana – 1
  • Great Britain – 1
  • Italy – 1
  • Kazakhstan – 1
  • Nigeria – 1
  • Poland – 1
  • Romania – 1
  • Turkey – 1
  • Venezuela – 1

 

References

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Golf: Olympic Rankings Published

The International Golf Federation has published the Olympic Golf Rankings. Over the past two years athletes gained points from select events which form the rankings. For athletes ranked in the top 15 a maximum of four athletes can represent one nation. However, for athletes ranked outside of the top 15 the maximum for one nation becomes two. In total sixty athletes will take part in each event. The ranking period lasted from July 14th 2014 to July 10th 2016.

While golf makes its return to the Olympics since 1904 it has been a bit of a bumpy ride for the men’s event. There have been multiple withdrawals, including the four highest ranked athletes in the rankings. Many of these golfers cited fear towards the Zika virus as the reason for their withdrawal. Overall only the United States will send the maximum of four athletes while other nations will send one or two athletes.

The women however have had much fewer withdrawals with everyone eligible in the top 15 so far committing to the games. South Korea will be the only nation sending four athletes while the United States will send three.

In total 40 nations will compete in golf’s return to the Olympics. Athletes and nations have one week to formally confirm their participation to the games so there may be a few more withdrawals before the games begin.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • United States – 7
  • South Korea – 6
  • Australia – 4
  • Canada – 4
  • China – 4
  • Chinese Taipei – 4
  • Denmark – 4
  • Finland – 4
  • France – 4
  • Germany – 4
  • Great Britain – 4
  • Italy – 4
  • Japan – 4
  • Malaysia – 4
  • New Zealand – 4
  • South Africa – 4
  • Spain – 4
  • Sweden – 4
  • Thailand – 4
  • Belgium – 3
  • India – 3
  • Ireland – 3
  • Netherlands – 3
  • Norway – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Austria – 2
  • Brazil – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • Paraguay – 2
  • Philippines – 2
  • Switzerland – 2
  • Bangladesh – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Hong Kong – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Portugal – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Venezuela – 1

 

References

Boxing: Professional Athletes Qualified at APB/WSB Qualifier

The final qualification quotas were decided at the 2016 APB/WSB Olympic Qualification Event. At this tournament boxers from AIBA Pro Boxing and World Series of Boxing are allowed to compete. In addition, with the late ruling allowing full professional boxers to compete this will be the only opportunity for them to qualify to the Olympics. In total the highest ranked boxers from the men’s heavyweight and super heavyweight qualified to the Olympics while for the other eight weight classes the top three athletes qualified to the Olympics. The APB/WSB Olympic Qualification Event was held in Vargas, Venezuela from July 3rd to July 8th 2016.

The late rule change to allow all professional boxers was met with some controversy with some nations declaring it was unfair to change the rules this late with some nations refusing to allow professionals to compete even if they had space on the team. Pro boxing organisations also threatened suspensions for athletes whom choose to compete in the Olympics. In the end only a small group of professionals actually competed. Two of the most prominent pros which qualified were Thailand’s Amnat Ruenroeng in the men’s lightweight (-60kg) and Cameroon’s Hassan N’Dam N’Jikam in the men’s light heavyweight (-81kg). Both actually lost their final match with Mexico’s Lindolfo Delgado defeating Ruenroeng and Colombia’s Juan Carlos Carrillo defeating N’Jikam. Also qualifying in those weights were Italy’s Carmine Tommasone (-60kg) and Ukraine’s Denys Soloneko (-81kg).

Mexico was the top performing nation, winning three gold medals. Along with Delgado, Joselito Velazquez defeated Ecuador’s Carlos Quipo in the men’s light flyweight (-49kg) and Juan Pablo Romero won in a walkover against Germany’s Arajik Marutjan in the men’s welterweight (-69kg). Also qualifying were Argentina’s Leandro Blanc in the light flyweight and Spain’s Youba Sissokho in the welterweight.

While Mexico won the most gold medals Venezuela qualified the most athletes, with four in total. Overall they won two events; Yoel Finol Rivas defeated Germany’s Hamza Touba in the men’s flyweight (-52kg), Colombia’s Ceiber Avila finished third and Edgar Munoz won the only available spot in the men’s super heavyweight (+91kg) with his win over Ukraine’s Rostyslav Arkhypenko. Also qualifying for Venezuela was Endry Jose Pinto whom lost to Ecuador’s Marlo Delgado in the men’s middleweight (-75kg), Turkey’s Onder Sipal won the third quota and Victor Rodriguez grabbed the third quota in the men’s bantamweight (-56kg). The winner of that event was Kenya’s Benson Gicharu whom won in a walkover against Dominican Republic’s Hector Garcia.

 

In the men’s light welterweight (-64kg) Armenia’s Hovhannes won in a technical knock-out over Qatar’s Thulasi Tharumalingam. The third quota for that event went to Ukraine’s Volodymyr Matviychuk whom won in a walk-over against Argentina’s Carlos Daniel Aquino. The lone quota in the men’s heavyweight (-91kg) went to Ecuador’s Julio Cesar Castillo whom defeated Croatia’s Marko Calic in the final.

 

This was the final opportunity for athletes to qualify in boxing. All that is remaining is for the nations to confirm the quotas and for the tripartite commission to announce the remaining tripartite quotas.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Venezuela – 4
  • Ecuador – 3
  • Mexico – 3
  • Colombia – 2
  • Germany – 2
  • Ukraine – 2
  • Argentina – 1
  • Armenia – 1
  • Cameroon – 1
  • Dominican Republic – 1
  • Italy – 1
  • Kenya – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Spain – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Turkey – 1

 

References

Diving: FINA Announces Participating Athletes

FINA has released the list of athletes which will compete in diving. The list also reveals the additional divers added to reach the maximum quota. Each gender had a maximum quota of 68 athletes for the individual and synchronized diving events. For every athlete which competed in the synchronized event, but not the individual event caused the individual event to have one fewer athlete competing relative to the maximum. In summary in the men’s 3m springboard 29 athletes will compete in the individual event and in the women’s 3m springboard and men’s and women’s 10m platform 28 athletes will compete in the individual event.

The next best ranked divers from the 2016 Diving World Cup were added to reach the aliquoted individual quota. This means for the men’s 3m springboard Germany and Austria gained an additional quota and for the men’s 10m platform Italy, Canada and Belarus gained quotas.

For the women’s events there were also declinations of quotas. For the women’s 3m springboard the Netherlands and South Africa declined a quota while Japan declined a quota it would have received through the reallocation process. Similarly in the women’s 10m platform Japan declined a quota while the Netherlands declined a quota it would have received through the reallocation process. Overall for the women’s 3m springboard Germany, United States, Colombia, Russia, Egypt, New Zealand and South Africa gained quotas to compete and in the women’s 10m platform Ukraine, Germany, Hungary, Brazil and Russia gained quotas.

There is still one female quota left unallocated, this was likely due to South Africa’s late rejection of one of their women’s 3m springboard quotas. It is likely the quota will eventually be filled by the next highest ranked athlete from the 2016 Diving World Cup, specifically Croatia.

Update: Croatia has received the quota in women’s 3m springboard.

 

New Quotas by Nations

  • Germany – 3
  • Russia – 2
  • Austria – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Brazil – 1
  • Canada – 1
  • Colombia – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Egypt – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Italy – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Ukraine – 1
  • United States – 1
  • Japan – -1
  • Netherlands – -1

 

Overall Athletes by Nation

  • China – 13
  • Great Britain – 11
  • United States – 10
  • Australia – 9
  • Brazil – 9
  • Mexico – 9
  • Germany – 8
  • Italy – 8
  • Russia – 8
  • Canada – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Malaysia – 6
  • Colombia – 4
  • Egypt – 4
  • France – 3
  • Japan – 3
  • North Korea – 3
  • Belarus – 2
  • Venezuela – 2
  • Austria – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Ireland – 1
  • Jamaica – 1
  • Netherlands – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Puerto Rico – 1
  • South Africa – 1
  • South Korea – 1

 

References

Beach Volleyball: Chile and Venezuela Win CSV Continental Cup Final

Chile and Venezuela won gold at the CSV Continental Cup Final. The Continental Cup features nations with two teams each facing off against each other. Each nation designates a team 1 and a team 2. In total 6 nations faced off against each other through a five match series in a round robin format. The winner of the South American Continental Cup qualifies to the Olympics. The men’s final of the Beach Volleyball South American Continental Cup was held in Santiago, Chile while the women’s final was held in Rosario, Argentina from June 22nd to June 26th 2016.

The women’s tournament saw Argentina, Paraguay and Venezuela win their first two matches against a combination of Chile, Colombia and Uruguay. In a battle between undefeated teams Venezuela defeated Paraguay 3-1 in the third set of matches while Uruguay won its first match over Chile. Argentina suffered a setback as one of their team members suffered an injury and had to withdraw, helping Colombia to secure their first victory. Argentina was unable to recover from the injury and was essentially forced to forfeit to Venezuela on the fourth day of matches. Venezuela’s win along with Uruguay’s and Colombia’s victories over Paraguay and Chile respectively meant Venezuela qualified to the Olympics. Fifth day saw Colombia, Venezuela and Paraguay score victories over Uruguay, Chile and Argentina respectively.

The men’s tournament began similarly as the women’s with Argentina, Chile and Venezuela winning their first two matches against a combination of Colombia, French Guiana and Uruguay. As a reminder French Guiana cannot qualify to the Olympics as they do not have their own NOC. On the third set of matches Venezuela gave Argentina its first loss by winning 3-1. Chile also remained undefeated with a 3-1 victory over Colombia. Both Chile and Venezuela remained undefeated after the fourth set of matches with wins over Argentina and French Guiana respectively. On the fifth and final day Chile was able to qualify to the Olympics after a hard fought 3-2 victory over Venezuela.

There will be one more chance for teams to qualify to the Olympics, at the Final Olympic Continental Cup. The top two teams which failed to qualify; Venezuela and Uruguay for the men and Paraguay and Colombia for the women will battle it out for the final spots.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Chile – 1
  • Venezuela – 1

 

References

Swimming: China Tops Marathon Swimming Olympic Qualifiers

China won gold in both events at the 2016 Marathon Swimming Olympic Qualifier. In each event the top 10 highest ranked athletes, with a maximum of one athlete per nation qualified to the Olympics. Similarly the highest ranked eligible athlete from each continent also qualified to the Olympics. The Marathon Swimming Olympic Qualifier was held in Setubal, Portugal from June 11th to June 12th 2016.

In the women’s 10km race it was China’s Yan Siyu whom led the pack for the first two laps. She would go on to lose the lead with Poland’s Joanna Zachoszcz leading at the end of the third lap and her compatriot Xin Xin leading in the fourth and fifth laps, but she remained within the lead group. Going into the sixth and final lap the lead group was numbered at about 10. During the final lap three swimmers; Xin Xin, Great Britain’s Keri-Anne Payne and Ecuador’s Samantha Arevalo broke away and had a sprint swim towards the finish line where Xin finished ahead of Payne with a time of 1:55:12.1, just 0.8 seconds ahead. Arevalo won the bronze medal.

The top 10 eligible swimmers which qualified to the Olympics were;  Xin Xin (China), Keri-Anne Payne (Great Britain), Samantha Arevalo (Ecuador), Chelsea Gubecka (Australia), Yumi Kida (Japan), Michelle Weber (South Africa), Joanna Zachoszcz (Poland), Paola Perez (Venezuela), Spela Perse (Slovenia) and Jana Pechanova (Czech Republic). The five continental qualifiers were Erika Villaecija (Spain), Stephanie Horner (Canada), Heidi Gan (Malaysia), Charlotte Webby (New Zealand) and Reem Kaseem (Egypt).

The men’s 10km race saw multiple lead changes and had a lead group of about 20 athletes going into the final lap. As the final lap progressed the number of athletes in the lead group dwindled, until only China’s Zu Lijun remained as he won the race with a time of 1:52:18.2. 2.2 second later Germany’s Christian Reichert won the silver while Ecuador’s Ivan Enderica Ochoa won the bronze.

The top 10 eligible swimmers which qualified to the Olympics were; Zu Lijun (China), Christian Reichert (Germany), Ivan Enderica Ochoa (Ecuador), Evgenii Drattcev (Russia), Ous Mellouli (Tunisia), Richard Nagy (Slovakia), Jarrod Poort (Australia), Yasunari Hirai (Japan), Chad Ho (South Africa) and Ventsislav Aydarski (Bulgaria). The five continental qualifiers were Mark Papp (Hungary), Erwin Maldonado (Venezuela), Kane Radford (New Zealand), Vitaliy Khudyakov (Kazakhstan) and Marwan Elamrawy (Egypt).

This was the final opportunity to qualify in marathon swimming. Swimmers can still attempt to qualify to the pool events by reaching the qualification times.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Australia – 2
  • China – 2
  • Ecuador – 2
  • Egypt – 2
  • Japan – 2
  • New Zealand – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Venezuela – 2
  • Bulgaria – 1
  • Canada – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Germany – 1
  • Great Britain – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Kazakhstan – 1
  • Malaysia – 1
  • Poland – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Slovakia – 1
  • Slovenia – 1
  • Spain – 1
  • Tunisia – 1

 

References

Judo: Olympic Rankings Published 113 Nations Qualify

113 nations qualified through the Judo Olympic Rankings. Athletes earned points through various world and continental events over a two year period. There were two methods of qualifying. First the top 22 men and top 14 women qualify with a maximum of one NOC per weight class. Second are the continental qualifiers. The highest ranked, not yet qualified athletes across all events can qualify. Each continent has a set amount of quotas; Africa 24 (14 men, 10 women), Europe 25 (14 men, 11 women), Asia 20 (12 men, 8 women), Oceania 10 (7 men, 3 women), and Pan America 21 (13 men, 8 women). A nation can only earn one spot across all events through this and a single continent can qualify a maximum of two athletes in a single event. The qualification period lasted from May 30th 2014 to May 29th 2016.

In total 113 nations have qualified with France and Japan joining hosts Brazil as being the only nation to have qualified a full team of men and women. Also qualifying a full men’s team are Georgia, Germany, Mongolia, Russia, South Korea and Uzbekistan. Overall 53 nations only qualified through the continental rankings while 14 nations did not receive a continental quota. Oceania did not allocate all 10 of its continental quotas thus the unused quota was reallocated to the athlete with the most points and is not yet qualified among all events, specifically Uzbekistan’s Soyib Kurbonov in the men’s -100kg.

The quotas are tied to the athletes by name with the exception of where multiple athletes from the same nation finished in the top 22 for men and top 14 for women where the nation can choose from among them. All that is left to determine in judo is the tripartite quotas.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • France – 14
  • Japan – 14
  • Germany – 13
  • Mongolia – 13
  • South Korea – 12
  • Netherlands – 11
  • Russia – 11
  • Cuba – 9
  • Canada – 8
  • China – 8
  • Georgia – 8
  • Hungary – 8
  • Uzbekistan – 8
  • Australia – 7
  • Great Britain – 7
  • Israel – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Azerbaijan – 6
  • Portugal – 6
  • United States – 6
  • Algeria – 5
  • Austria – 5
  • Belgium – 5
  • Egypt – 5
  • Italy – 5
  • Kazakhstan – 5
  • Slovenia – 5
  • Spain – 5
  • Poland – 4
  • Romania – 4
  • Sweden – 4
  • Tunisia – 4
  • Turkey – 4
  • Czech Republic – 3
  • Ecuador – 3
  • Iran – 3
  • Morocco – 3
  • North Korea – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • United Arab Emirates – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Belarus – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Chinese Taipei – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Gabon – 2
  • Greece – 2
  • Kosovo – 2
  • Kyrgyzstan – 2
  • Latvia – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • Puerto Rico – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Tajikistan – 2
  • Turkmenistan – 2
  • American Samoa – 1
  • Angola – 1
  • Armenia – 1
  • Aruba – 1
  • Benin – 1
  • Bolivia – 1
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – 1
  • Burkina Faso – 1
  • Cameroon – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Congo – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Côte d’Ivoire – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Dominican Republic – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Fiji – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Gambia – 1
  • Ghana – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Guinea-Bissau – 1
  • Haiti – 1
  • Honduras – 1
  • Iceland – 1
  • India – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Jordan – 1
  • Kenya – 1
  • Lebanon – 1
  • Libya – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Madagascar – 1
  • Mali – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Mozambique – 1
  • Nauru – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Niger – 1
  • Pakistan – 1
  • Palau – 1
  • Papua New Guinea – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Samoa – 1
  • Saudi Arabia – 1
  • Senegal – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Seychelles – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Trinidad and Tobago – 1
  • Uruguay – 1
  • Vanuatu – 1
  • Venezuela – 1
  • Vietnam – 1
  • Zambia – 1

 

References