Golf: IGF Confirms Field After Late Changes

The International Golf Federation has announced an updated list of qualified athletes. Some quotas where denied by their federation while others were due to later withdrawals. In total three men and three women have been replaced.

On the women’s side the Netherlands declined both of their quotas while New Zealand also declined Cathryn Bristow’s quota. During the reallocation process Philippines’ Dottie Ardina withdrew. The three reallocated quotas went to Victoria Lovelady (Brazil), Stephanie Meadow (Ireland) and Maha Haddioui (Morocco)

On the men’s side Camilo Villegas (Colombia), Francesco Molinari (Italy) and Angelo Que (Philippines) withdrew and have been replaced by Matteo Manassero (Italy), Rodolfo Cazaubon (Mexico) and Jose-Filipe Lima (Portugal).

 

Net Changes by Nations

  • Brazil – 1
  • Ireland – 1
  • Mexico – 1
  • Morocco – 1
  • Portugal – 1
  • Italy – 0
  • Colombia – -1
  • New Zealand – -1
  • Philippines – -1
  • Netherlands – -2

 

References

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Golf: Olympic Rankings Published

The International Golf Federation has published the Olympic Golf Rankings. Over the past two years athletes gained points from select events which form the rankings. For athletes ranked in the top 15 a maximum of four athletes can represent one nation. However, for athletes ranked outside of the top 15 the maximum for one nation becomes two. In total sixty athletes will take part in each event. The ranking period lasted from July 14th 2014 to July 10th 2016.

While golf makes its return to the Olympics since 1904 it has been a bit of a bumpy ride for the men’s event. There have been multiple withdrawals, including the four highest ranked athletes in the rankings. Many of these golfers cited fear towards the Zika virus as the reason for their withdrawal. Overall only the United States will send the maximum of four athletes while other nations will send one or two athletes.

The women however have had much fewer withdrawals with everyone eligible in the top 15 so far committing to the games. South Korea will be the only nation sending four athletes while the United States will send three.

In total 40 nations will compete in golf’s return to the Olympics. Athletes and nations have one week to formally confirm their participation to the games so there may be a few more withdrawals before the games begin.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • United States – 7
  • South Korea – 6
  • Australia – 4
  • Canada – 4
  • China – 4
  • Chinese Taipei – 4
  • Denmark – 4
  • Finland – 4
  • France – 4
  • Germany – 4
  • Great Britain – 4
  • Italy – 4
  • Japan – 4
  • Malaysia – 4
  • New Zealand – 4
  • South Africa – 4
  • Spain – 4
  • Sweden – 4
  • Thailand – 4
  • Belgium – 3
  • India – 3
  • Ireland – 3
  • Netherlands – 3
  • Norway – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Austria – 2
  • Brazil – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • Paraguay – 2
  • Philippines – 2
  • Switzerland – 2
  • Bangladesh – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Hong Kong – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Portugal – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Venezuela – 1

 

References

Diving: FINA Announces Participating Athletes

FINA has released the list of athletes which will compete in diving. The list also reveals the additional divers added to reach the maximum quota. Each gender had a maximum quota of 68 athletes for the individual and synchronized diving events. For every athlete which competed in the synchronized event, but not the individual event caused the individual event to have one fewer athlete competing relative to the maximum. In summary in the men’s 3m springboard 29 athletes will compete in the individual event and in the women’s 3m springboard and men’s and women’s 10m platform 28 athletes will compete in the individual event.

The next best ranked divers from the 2016 Diving World Cup were added to reach the aliquoted individual quota. This means for the men’s 3m springboard Germany and Austria gained an additional quota and for the men’s 10m platform Italy, Canada and Belarus gained quotas.

For the women’s events there were also declinations of quotas. For the women’s 3m springboard the Netherlands and South Africa declined a quota while Japan declined a quota it would have received through the reallocation process. Similarly in the women’s 10m platform Japan declined a quota while the Netherlands declined a quota it would have received through the reallocation process. Overall for the women’s 3m springboard Germany, United States, Colombia, Russia, Egypt, New Zealand and South Africa gained quotas to compete and in the women’s 10m platform Ukraine, Germany, Hungary, Brazil and Russia gained quotas.

There is still one female quota left unallocated, this was likely due to South Africa’s late rejection of one of their women’s 3m springboard quotas. It is likely the quota will eventually be filled by the next highest ranked athlete from the 2016 Diving World Cup, specifically Croatia.

Update: Croatia has received the quota in women’s 3m springboard.

 

New Quotas by Nations

  • Germany – 3
  • Russia – 2
  • Austria – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Brazil – 1
  • Canada – 1
  • Colombia – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Egypt – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Italy – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Ukraine – 1
  • United States – 1
  • Japan – -1
  • Netherlands – -1

 

Overall Athletes by Nation

  • China – 13
  • Great Britain – 11
  • United States – 10
  • Australia – 9
  • Brazil – 9
  • Mexico – 9
  • Germany – 8
  • Italy – 8
  • Russia – 8
  • Canada – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Malaysia – 6
  • Colombia – 4
  • Egypt – 4
  • France – 3
  • Japan – 3
  • North Korea – 3
  • Belarus – 2
  • Venezuela – 2
  • Austria – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Ireland – 1
  • Jamaica – 1
  • Netherlands – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Puerto Rico – 1
  • South Africa – 1
  • South Korea – 1

 

References

Boxing: 29 Nations Qualify After World Qualification Tournament

29 nations qualified at least one athlete after the 2016 Boxing World Olympic Qualification Tournament. One quota was available in the heavyweight and super heavyweight, two quotas were available in the men’s light flyweight and five quotas were available in the other seven events. In the events with five quotas the quarter-finalist whom lost to the eventual winner qualified as the fifth best athlete. The AIBA World Olympic Qualification Tournament was held in Baku, Azerbaijan from June 16th to June 25th 2016.

Overall nine nations won a gold medal among the ten events. The only nation which won two gold medals was Azerbaijan whom won gold in the light flyweight (-49kg) and light heavyweight (-81kg). In the light flyweight Rufat Huseynov defeated Spain’s Samuel Carmona in the final. In the light heavyweight 2012 Olympic bronze medalist Teymur Mammadov defeated Germany’s Serge Michel in the final. Also qualifying were Russia’s Petr Khamukov, Belarus’ Mikhail Dauhaliavets and Morocco’s Hassan Saada. Azerbaijan also qualified a third athlete in the middleweight (-75kg) where Kamran Shakhsuvarly lost to the eventual gold medalist Michael O’Reilly of Ireland whom defeated Turkmenistan’s Arslanbek Achilov in the final. Also qualifying in the middleweight are Iraq’s Waheed Abdul-Ridha and India’s Vikas Yadav.

The only other nation to have qualified three athletes from this event was France. Souleymane Cissokho defeated Hungary’s Imre Bacskai to win the welterweight (-69kg). Also qualifying were Belarus’ Pavel Kastramin, Great Britain’s Josh Kelly and Bulgaria’s Simeon Chamov. The other two French athletes which qualified were Elie Konki in the flyweight (-52kg) and Hassan Amzile in the light welterweight (-64kg). The flyweight was won by Bulgaria’s Daniel Asenov whom defeated United States’ Antonio Vargas. Also qualifying were Turkey’s Selcuk Eker and Mongolia’s Kharkhuugiin Enkh-Amar. The light welterweight was won by Great Britain’s Pat McCormack whom defeated Haiti’s Richardson Hitchins. Also qualifying were United States’ Gary Russell and India’s Monoj Kumar.

The bantamweight (-56kg) was won by 2013 World Championship bronze medalist Mykola Butsenko of Ukraine whom defeated Mongolia’s Erdenebatyn Tsendbaatar. Also qualifying were Cuba’s Robeisy Ramirez, Japan’s Arashi Morisaka and Algeria’s Fahem Hammachi. Netherlands’ Enrico Lacruz defeated Tajikistan’s Anvar Yunusov in the final of the lightweight (-60kg) event. Also qualifying are China’s Shan Jun, Chinese Taipei’s Lai Chun-En and Qatar’s Hakan Erseker. The lone quotas for the heavyweight (-90kg) and super heavyweight (+90kg) went to Poland’s Igor Jakubowski and Italy’s Guido Vianello respectively.

There will be one more opportunity for male boxers to qualify to the Olympics, the APB and WSB qualifier which will allow professional boxers to qualify, provided a nation has not already qualified in that event.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Azerbaijan – 3
  • France – 3
  • Belarus – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Germany – 2
  • India – 2
  • Mongolia – 2
  • United States – 2
  • Algeria – 1
  • China – 1
  • Chinese Taipei – 1
  • Cuba – 1
  • Great Britain – 1
  • Haiti – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Ireland – 1
  • Italy – 1
  • Japan – 1
  • Morocco – 1
  • Netherlands – 1
  • Poland – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Spain – 1
  • Tajikistan – 1
  • Turkey – 1
  • Turkmenistan – 1
  • Ukraine – 1

 

References

Boxing: Olympic Quotas Won At Women’s World Championship

12 Olympic quotas were up for grabs at the 2016 Women’s World Boxing Championship. The four semi-finalists in the three Olympic weight classes qualify to the Olympics. Should the athlete have previously qualified from the continental qualifiers then the quota is reallocated to the next highest ranked athlete from that specific continental qualifier. The Women’s World Boxing Championship was held in Astana, Kazakhstan from May 19th to May 27th 2016.

The women’s flyweight (-51kg) was won by 2012 Olympic gold medalist Nicole Adams of Great Britain whom defeated Thailand’s Peamwilai Laopeam in the final. Also qualifying to the Olympics are Zhaina Shekerbekova of Kazakhstan and Sarah Ourahmoune of France. Since Adams qualified through the World Championship her European qualifier quota was reallocated to Ukraine’s Tetyana Kob.

The women’s lightweight (-60kg) saw five-time world champion and 2012 Olympic gold medalist Katie Taylor lose to France’s Estelle Mossely in the semi-final. In the other semi-final Russia’s Anastasiia Beliakova defeated Finland’s Mira Potkonen. Mossely defeated Beliakova in the final.

The women’s middleweight (-75kg) event had 2012 Olympic gold medalist Claressa Shields win her second world title in a row after defeating Netherlands’ Nouchka Fontijn in the final. Chinese Taipei’s Chen Nien-Chin and Great Britain’s Savannah Marshall also qualified to the Olympics. Since Shields qualified through the World Championship her Pan American qualifier quota was reallocated to Brazil’s Andreia Bandeira.

This was the final opportunity for women to qualify to the Olympics in boxing. One spot still remains in each weight class to be given out as a wildcard. We expect the wildcards to be announced sometime after the final men’s boxing qualifier.

 

Net Quotas by Nations

  • France – 2
  • Brazil – 1
  • Chinese Taipei – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Great Britain – 1
  • Ireland – 1
  • Kazakhstan – 1
  • Netherlands – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Ukraine – 1

 

References

Rowing: Qualification Concludes With European and Final Regatta

In total 24 nations qualified boats at the 2016 European and Final Olympic Qualification Regatta. The regatta was split into two qualification tournaments. The European portion which includes entries from Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States had Olympic qualification for the top three boats in the single sculls and the top two boats in the lightweight double sculls. Like the other continental qualifiers a nation can only qualify one boat per gender. The final regatta portion contained the other 10 events where any nation can qualify. In total two boat quotas were available in the double sculls, quadruple sculls, eights, men’s pairs, men’s fours and men’s lightweight fours while four boat quotas were available in the women’s pairs. The European and Final Olympic Qualification Regatta was held in Lucerne, Switzerland from May 22nd to May 24th 2016.

In the European Regatta an extra boat quota was made available in the women’s single sculls due to a returned quota from the tripartite commission. The women’s single sculls was won by New Zealand’s Emma Twigg whom finished with a time of 7:21.870. Also joining her to the Olympics were boats from Ireland, Belarus and Denmark. The women’s lightweight doubles sculls was won by the Netherlands with a time of 6:54.910. Joining them was the silver medal boat from Romania.

On the men’s side the single sculls was won by Belgium’s Hannes Obreno whom won gold with a time of 6:47.610. Also qualifying to the Olympics were boats from Australia and Hungary. Belgium also won the men’s lightweight double sculls with a time of 6:21.780 while Turkey won the silver medal. Since a nation can only qualify one boat per gender at the continental qualifier this meant Belgium will have to pick between the men’s single sculls and lightweight double sculls. The non-selected boat will be reallocated to the next best boat here which will be Denmark regardless of choice.

At the Final Olympic Qualification Regatta Spain won the women’s pairs event with a time of 7:10.160. Joining them to the Olympics will be China, Italy and Poland. The women’s double sculls had the Czech Republic defeating Denmark with a time of 6:56.690. The women’s quadruple sculls was won by China whom finished 1.67 seconds ahead of the silver medalists from the Ukraine finishing with a time of 6:19.000. Romania won the women’s eights with a time of 6:02.560 while the Netherlands also qualified to the Olympics, finishing with the silver medal.

Among the men’s boats the Czech Republic won the men’s pairs with a time of 6:29.820 while Hungary also qualified by winning the silver medal. The men’s double sculls was won by Norway whom won by almost 2 seconds against Serbia, finishing with a time of 6:16.130. Similarly South Africa won the men’s fours by almost 2 seconds, winning against France with a time of 5:55.220. The men’s quadruple sculls was won by Russia whom defeated Canada with a time of 5:42.130. Russia was also able to win the men’s lightweight four by defeating Germany with a time of 6:02.970. The men’s eights had a three-way race for almost the entire race, but with only two Olympic quotas available Italy was the odd nation out as the United States won the gold over Poland with a time of 5:29.160.

This was the final opportunity for nations to qualify in rowing and with the exception of Belgium’s choice between the men’s single sculls and lightweight double sculls all of the boats competing are now known. In total 68 nations will be competing in rowing.

 

Boats by Nations

  • Belgium – 2*
  • China – 2
  • Denmark – 2
  • Hungary – 2
  • Netherlands – 2
  • Poland – 2
  • Romania – 2
  • Russia – 2
  • Australia – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Canada – 1
  • France – 1
  • Germany – 1
  • Ireland – 1
  • Italy – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • South Africa – 1
  • Spain – 1
  • Turkey – 1
  • Ukraine – 1
  • United States – 1

* Must choose one boat

 

Athlete Quotas by Nations

  • Netherlands – 11
  • Poland – 11
  • Romania – 11
  • United States – 9
  • Russia – 8
  • China – 6
  • Canada – 4
  • Czech Republic – 4
  • France – 4
  • Germany – 4
  • South Africa – 4
  • Ukraine – 4
  • Belgium – 3*
  • Denmark – 3
  • Hungary – 3
  • Italy – 2
  • Norway – 2
  • Serbia – 2
  • Spain – 2
  • Turkey – 2
  • Australia – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Ireland – 1
  • New Zealand – 1

* Will either be 1 or 2 athlete quotas depending on boat choice

 

References

Triathlon: Qualified Nations List Released

The International Triathlon Union has published its Olympic Qualification List filling out the qualified nations through the Olympic Rankings, Olympic Points List and tripartite nations. The Olympic Rankings and Olympic Points List consisted of approved events including World Championship, Continental Championship and other world events. The top eight nations were allowed to qualify three athletes per gender through the Olympic rankings including the quotas obtained through the continental qualifiers and world qualification event. All other nations were allowed to qualify a maximum of two. Originally the top 39 eligible athletes from the Olympic Rankings qualified their nation to the Olympics, however, reallocations has increased that number. The Olympic Points List gave one quota to each of the five continents to athletes whose nations have yet to qualify in triathlon, provided that they met the minimum ranking of 140. For the tripartite commission, two men’s and two women’s quotas were available to athletes from nations whom have qualified an average of 8 or less athletes from individual events over the past two Olympics. They too had to meet the minimum ranking requirements. The Olympic Rankings and Olympic Points List were created using results from various events from May 15th 2014 to May 15th 2016.

In the men’s race a total of 23 nations qualified through the Olympic Rankings. They include Argentina (2), Australia (2), Azerbaijan, Belgium (2), Brazil, Canada (2), Costa Rica, Denmark, France (2), Germany (2), Great Britain (2), Hungary, Ireland, Italy (2), Mexico, Norway, New Zealand (2), Portugal (2), Russia (3), Slovakia, Spain (2), Switzerland and the United States (3). Since Brazil was among the qualified nations its host quota has been reallocated to Israel. Only one tripartite quota was awarded to Jordan which meant the other quota place was reallocated to Mexico. The Olympic Points List gave quotas to Austria, Barbados and China. Since there were no eligible nations in Africa and Oceania the quotas were reallocated to Hungary and Portugal.

In the women’s race a total of 25 nations qualified through the Olympic Rankings. They include Australia (2), Austria (2), Belgium, Bermuda, Brazil, Canada (2), Czech Republic, France, Germany (3), Great Britain, Hungary (2), Ireland, Italy (2), Japan (2), Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand (3), Poland, Russia (2), Slovenia, South Africa, Spain (3), Switzerland, Ukraine and the United States (2). Since Brazil was among the qualified nations its host quota has been reallocated to the Netherlands. No tripartite quota was awarded in the women’s race meaning the quotas have been reallocated to Belgium and Sweden. The Olympic Points List gave quotas to China, Ecuador, Estonia and Mauritius. Since there were no eligible nations in Oceania the quota was reallocated to Canada.

Overall the eight nations which will send three athletes in the men’s race are Australia, France, Great Britain, Mexico, Portugal, Russia, Spain and the United States. For the women the nations are Australia, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Japan, New Zealand, Spain and the United States. As a reminder this is a provisional list and is subjected to the approval of nations so there is the potential for reallocation.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Canada – 5
  • Germany – 5
  • New Zealand – 5
  • Russia – 5
  • Spain – 5
  • United States – 5
  • Australia – 4
  • Belgium – 4
  • Hungary – 4
  • Italy – 4
  • Austria – 3
  • France – 3
  • Great Britain – 3
  • Mexico – 3
  • Portugal – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Brazil – 2
  • China – 2
  • Ireland – 2
  • Japan – 2
  • Netherlands – 2
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • Barbados – 1
  • Bermuda – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Denmark – 1
  • Ecuador – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Jordan – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Poland – 1
  • Slovakia – 1
  • Slovenia – 1
  • South Africa – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • Ukraine – 1

 

References