Russia: Sport Federations Removed Athletes From Result of McLaren Report

With the publication of the McLaren Report on the accusation of government sponsored doping from Russia the IOC has ruled that Russia will not be banned from the 2016 Olympic Games, but gave each sport federation a set of rules to follow and remove athletes should they not meet the standards. The notable rules include the removal of all athletes implicated in the report, the removal of athletes whom have doped in the past and the removal of athletes which have not satisfied testing standards after excluding the results from the Moscow lab. While most sports did not make any changes others have.

Before the report was released athletics had already banned all of Russia’s athletes, with the exception of ones which have been out of the Russian testing system long enough. Currently only Darya Klishina has satisfied IAAF’s standard, she will compete in the women’s long jump. The other 67 athletes chosen by Russia did not make the standard. Yuliya Stepanova was also eligible to compete, but due to her role in exposing the Russian doping scandal she currently has not been selected to compete.

Besides athletics the biggest loss of athlete quotas comes from rowing. Originally Russia qualified five boats with 28 athletes (including 2 coxswains). In total 20 athletes were found to not have sufficient testing, causing World Rowing to remove four boats from Russia; the men’s lightweight fours, men’s eights, women’s lightweight double sculls and women’s eights. Russia was allowed to make a team to compete in the men’s fours out of the remaining six rowers; the two coxswains were technically eligible though for obvious reasons were not going to be selected. The reallocated boats went to Australia (women’s eights), Greece (men’s lightweight fours) and Italy (men’s eights and women’s lightweight double sculls).

Overall only one sport suffered a full banned. Due to multiple athletes getting caught doping the International Weightlifting Federation has completely banned Russia. Earlier Russia lost one man and one woman quota due to excess doping violations, but now they have lost the remaining eight (5 men, 3 women) quotas. The women’s quotas have been reallocated to Albania, Georgia and Moldova while the men’s quotas have been reallocated to Belgium, Croatia, El Salvador, Mongolia and Serbia.

In aquatics only swimmers were removed. Four athletes were removed due to having prior doping violations while three more were removed due to being implicated into the report. One of these athletes was open water swimmer Anastasia Krapivina. This means her quota has been reallocated to Hungary’s Anna Olasz.

The International Canoeing Federation announced five athletes scheduled to compete at the 2016 Olympics will be removed due to their involvement in the report. This has caused Russia to lose athlete quotas in five boats; men’s K2 200m, men’s C1 200m, men’s C2 1000m, women’s K1 200m and women’s K2 500m. The quotas have been reallocated to Austria (women’s K2 500m), Germany (women’s K1 200m), Iran (men’s C1 200m) and Sweden (men’s K2 200m). The men’s C2 1000m was not reallocated. The additional boat in the women’s K1 500m which did not use an athlete quota has also been removed.

Edit: Sweden has declined the quota, it has been reallocated to Canada

In cycling six athletes were withdrawn, three due to previous doping violations and three others whom were implicated in the report. Currently the UCI has not named the athletes or any potential change in the quotas.

In modern pentathlon Maksim Kustov and alternate Ilia Frolov were connected in the report and have been excluded. The quota was reallocated to Latvia’s Ruslan Nakonechnyi.

United World Wrestling removed one wrestler due to a prior doping violation. Viktor Lebedev has been removed from his event, men’s freestyle -57kg. The quota was reallocated to Belarus.

In sailing one athlete, in the men’s 470 was connected to the report and has been removed. However, Russia has been given an opportunity to make a late replacement.

In total, including athletics the Russian team has shrank by 122 athletes. While most of them were removed due to previous doping offenses or being included in the report others have been excluded due to being teammates of someone who has doped.

 

Net Athlete Quotas by Nations

  • Italy – 11
  • Australia – 9
  • Greece – 4
  • Austria – 2
  • Canada – 2
  • Albania – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Belgium – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Georgia – 1
  • Germany – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Iran – 1
  • Latvia – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Mongolia – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Russia – -122

 

Note: Possible cycling reallocations have yet to be announced.

 

References

Weightlifting: IWF Sanctions Nations, Announces Reallocation Quotas

The International Weightlifting Federation has sanctioned eight nations due to their athletes testing positive for performance enhancing drugs multiple times. Overall Azerbaijan lost one male and one female quotas, Belarus lost one male quota, Kazakhstan lost one male and one female quotas, Moldova lost two male quotas, North Korea lost one male and one female quotas, Romania lost one male quota, Russia lost one male and one female quotas and Uzbekistan lost one female quota.

Sanctions could be increased to Belarus, Kazakhstan and Russia for a total ban depending on the result of the investigation from the 2008 and 2012 Olympics.

Unsurprisingly this will cause a massive change in the World Championship Rankings for Olympic quotas. Sadly the IWF has not published the change in rankings due to wanting to finalize everything. They however, published the reallocation of those quotas lost by the offending nations along with the six women’s quotas that were not allocated from the individual rankings.

The following nations were given a reallocation quota. For the men they are; Chile, Greece, Guatemala, Israel, Kenya, Nauru, Qatar and Sri Lanka. For the women they are; Argentina, Finland, Iraq, Latvia, Mauritius, Morocco, Peru, Solomon Islands, Sweden, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay.

 

Net Quotas by Nations

  • Argentina – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Greece – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Kenya – 1
  • Latvia – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Morocco – 1
  • Nauru – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Solomon Islands – 1
  • Sri Lanka – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • United Arab Emirates – 1
  • Uruguay – 1
  • Belarus – -1
  • Romania – -1
  • Uzbekistan – -1
  • Azerbaijan – -2
  • Kazakhstan – -2
  • Moldova – -2
  • North Korea – -2
  • Russia – -2

 

References

Judo: Olympic Rankings Published 113 Nations Qualify

113 nations qualified through the Judo Olympic Rankings. Athletes earned points through various world and continental events over a two year period. There were two methods of qualifying. First the top 22 men and top 14 women qualify with a maximum of one NOC per weight class. Second are the continental qualifiers. The highest ranked, not yet qualified athletes across all events can qualify. Each continent has a set amount of quotas; Africa 24 (14 men, 10 women), Europe 25 (14 men, 11 women), Asia 20 (12 men, 8 women), Oceania 10 (7 men, 3 women), and Pan America 21 (13 men, 8 women). A nation can only earn one spot across all events through this and a single continent can qualify a maximum of two athletes in a single event. The qualification period lasted from May 30th 2014 to May 29th 2016.

In total 113 nations have qualified with France and Japan joining hosts Brazil as being the only nation to have qualified a full team of men and women. Also qualifying a full men’s team are Georgia, Germany, Mongolia, Russia, South Korea and Uzbekistan. Overall 53 nations only qualified through the continental rankings while 14 nations did not receive a continental quota. Oceania did not allocate all 10 of its continental quotas thus the unused quota was reallocated to the athlete with the most points and is not yet qualified among all events, specifically Uzbekistan’s Soyib Kurbonov in the men’s -100kg.

The quotas are tied to the athletes by name with the exception of where multiple athletes from the same nation finished in the top 22 for men and top 14 for women where the nation can choose from among them. All that is left to determine in judo is the tripartite quotas.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • France – 14
  • Japan – 14
  • Germany – 13
  • Mongolia – 13
  • South Korea – 12
  • Netherlands – 11
  • Russia – 11
  • Cuba – 9
  • Canada – 8
  • China – 8
  • Georgia – 8
  • Hungary – 8
  • Uzbekistan – 8
  • Australia – 7
  • Great Britain – 7
  • Israel – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Azerbaijan – 6
  • Portugal – 6
  • United States – 6
  • Algeria – 5
  • Austria – 5
  • Belgium – 5
  • Egypt – 5
  • Italy – 5
  • Kazakhstan – 5
  • Slovenia – 5
  • Spain – 5
  • Poland – 4
  • Romania – 4
  • Sweden – 4
  • Tunisia – 4
  • Turkey – 4
  • Czech Republic – 3
  • Ecuador – 3
  • Iran – 3
  • Morocco – 3
  • North Korea – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • United Arab Emirates – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Belarus – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Chinese Taipei – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Gabon – 2
  • Greece – 2
  • Kosovo – 2
  • Kyrgyzstan – 2
  • Latvia – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • Puerto Rico – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Tajikistan – 2
  • Turkmenistan – 2
  • American Samoa – 1
  • Angola – 1
  • Armenia – 1
  • Aruba – 1
  • Benin – 1
  • Bolivia – 1
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – 1
  • Burkina Faso – 1
  • Cameroon – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Congo – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Côte d’Ivoire – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Dominican Republic – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Fiji – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Gambia – 1
  • Ghana – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Guinea-Bissau – 1
  • Haiti – 1
  • Honduras – 1
  • Iceland – 1
  • India – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Jordan – 1
  • Kenya – 1
  • Lebanon – 1
  • Libya – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Madagascar – 1
  • Mali – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Mozambique – 1
  • Nauru – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Niger – 1
  • Pakistan – 1
  • Palau – 1
  • Papua New Guinea – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Samoa – 1
  • Saudi Arabia – 1
  • Senegal – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Seychelles – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Trinidad and Tobago – 1
  • Uruguay – 1
  • Vanuatu – 1
  • Venezuela – 1
  • Vietnam – 1
  • Zambia – 1

 

References

Cycling Mountain: Cross-Country Olympic Rankings Published

The UCI Olympic Qualification Rankings have been published. The rankings consisted of the combined point total obtained by a nation’s top three athletes at select world and continental events over the past two years. For the men’s rankings nations ranked 1st-5th qualified three athletes, 6th-13th qualified two athletes and 14th-23rd qualified one athlete. For the women’s rankings nations ranked 1st-8th qualified two athletes and 9th-17th qualified one athlete. The UCI Olympic Qualification Ranking period lasted from May 25th 2014 to May 24th 2016.

The men’s rankings were topped by Switzerland whom finished with 9877 points. Also earning three athlete quotas was France, Spain, Czech Republic and Italy. The nations which earned two athlete quotas are; Germany, Netherlands, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Portugal, South Africa and Brazil. The nations which earned one athlete quota are; Austria, Slovakia, United States, Argentina, New Zealand, Denmark, Sweden, Greece, Israel and Japan.

With the release of the rankings there are also some reallocations to be done. First the host quota has been reallocated to the next highest ranked nation, Hungary. Also since Brazil, South Africa, Japan, Australia and New Zealand all qualified through the rankings their spot won at the continental qualifiers are reallocated to the next highest ranked nation at that qualifier meaning Costa Rica, Rwanda and Hong Kong are qualified. However, since no other Oceania nation competed at the continental qualifier the next level of reallocation is through the Olympic Rankings of teams from the same continent meaning Guam has qualified. Since no other Oceania nation is ranked in the Olympic Rankings the quota has been reallocated to the next highest ranked nation overall in the Olympic Rankings, specifically Russia.

The women’s ranking was also topped by Switzerland whom finished with a total of 8614 points. Also earning two athlete quotas was Germany, Canada, France, United States, Slovenia, Poland and Ukraine. The nations which earned one athlete quota are; Russia, Norway, Denmark, Belgium, Brazil, Italy, Australia, Sweden and Serbia.

Like with the men’s rankings there are a couple of reallocations. Since Brazil qualified through the rankings the host quota was reallocated to the next highest ranked nation, Czech Republic. Also since Australia qualified through the rankings their spot won at the continental qualifiers was reallocated to the next highest ranked nation from that qualifier, New Zealand.

This was the final opportunity for nations to qualify to the Olympics in mountain biking. There is still the possibility for reallocation as some nations may decline some or all of their quotas. We should know one way or another over the coming weeks.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • France – 5
  • Switzerland – 5
  • Canada – 4
  • Czech Republic – 4
  • Germany – 4
  • Italy – 4
  • Australia – 3
  • Belgium – 3
  • Brazil – 3
  • Spain – 3
  • United States – 3
  • Denmark – 2
  • Netherlands – 2
  • New Zealand – 2
  • Poland – 2
  • Portugal – 2
  • Russia – 2
  • Slovenia – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Sweden – 2
  • Ukraine – 2
  • Argentina – 1
  • Austria – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Greece – 1
  • Guam – 1
  • Hong Kong – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Japan – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Rwanda – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Slovakia – 1

 

References

Wrestling: 1st World Qualifier Qualifies 28 Nations

28 nations qualified at least one athlete at the 1st World Wrestling Qualification Tournament. The top three athletes from the men’s freestyle and Greco-Roman and the top two athletes from the women’s freestyle qualified their nations to the Olympics. The 1st World Wrestling Qualification Tournament was held in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia from April 22nd to April 24th 2016.

Belarus topped the Greco-Roman events by winning two gold medals. Aliaksandr Hrabovik defeated Georgia’s Revazi Nadareishvili in the -98kg while Javid Hamzatau defeated Armenia’s Maksim Manukyan in the -85kg. Armenia secured a second quota in the -75kg where Arsen Julfalakyan won the third place bout. The -75kg was won by Hungary’s Peter Bacsi in a walkover after China’s Yang Bin withdrew. China’s Meng Qiang also withdrew in the -130kg to give Iran’s Amir Ghasemi the victory. Uzbekistan’s Muminjon Abdullaev won the third place bout while his compatriot Elmurat Tasmuradov won the play-off match in the -59kg. The -59kg was won by South Korea’s Kim Seung-Kak whom defeated Norway’s Stig Andre Berge. Romania’s Ion Panait won the -66kg event over Finland’s Tero Valimaki. Lithuania’s Edgaras Venckaitis won the third place bout. Sweden also qualified two athletes in the third place bouts via Zakarias Berg in the -85kg and Fredrik Schon in the -98kg.

The United States qualified two athletes in the women freestyle events. In the -53kg Helen Maroulis defeated Greece Maria Prevolaraki while Haley Augello lost to North Korea’s Kim Hyon-Gyong in the -48kg. Hungary also qualified two athletes to the Olympics, but lost both of their final bouts. In the -63kg Marianna Sastin had to withdraw giving Turkey’s Hafize Sahin the victory while Zsanett Nemeth lost to France’s Cynthia Vescan in the final of the -75kg. The -58kg was won by Ecuador’s Lissette Antes whom defeated Germany’s Luisa Niemesch while the -69kg was won by Israel’s Ilana Kratysh whom defeated Venezuela’s Maria Acosta in the final. This will Israel’s first female wrestler to compete at the Olympics.

The final day contained results from the men’s freestyle events. In the -65kg it was Bahrain’s Adam Batirov whom defeated Georgia’s Zurabi Iakobishvili in the final. Third place bout winner Yakup Gor of Turkey also qualified to the Olympics. Turkey ended up qualifying a second quota as they won the -74kg event over Bulgaria’s Georgi Ivanov. Moldova’s Evgheni Nedealco also qualified to the Olympics by winning the third place bout. Moldova won a second third place bout through Nicolae Ceban in the -97kg event. The event was won by Armenia’s Georgy Ketoyev whom defeated Uzbekistan’s Magomed Ibragimov. The -86kg event was won by J’den Cox of the United States who defeated Venezuela’s Pedro Ceballos in the final. The third place bout was won by Poland’s Zbigniew Baranowski. Poland won a second third place bout with Robert Baran in the -125kg event. The event was won by China’s Deng Zhiwei in a walkover against Hungary’s Daniel Ligeti. The -57kg event was won by Romania’s Ivan Guidea whom defeated Azerbaijan’s Mirjalal Hasanzada in the final. The third place bout was won by Sandeep Tomar of India.

With this competition Azerbaijan and Georgia will be sending full men’s freestyle teams. Unqualified nations will get one more opportunity to qualify to the Olympics at a second world qualification tournament due to be held in May.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Hungary – 4
  • Armenia – 3
  • China – 3
  • Turkey – 3
  • United States – 3
  • Uzbekistan – 3
  • Belarus – 2
  • Georgia – 2
  • Moldova – 2
  • Poland – 2
  • Romania – 2
  • Sweden – 2
  • Venezuela – 2
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • Bahrain – 1
  • Bulgaria – 1
  • Ecuador – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • France – 1
  • Germany – 1
  • Greece – 1
  • India – 1
  • Iran – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • North Korea – 1
  • South Korea – 1

 

References

Gymnastics: Test Event Decide Remaining Quotas

France and Germany qualified a full artistic team, Germany and Uzbekistan qualified both an individual and team in rhythmic gymnastics and Portugal and the United States qualified an athlete in both genders in trampoline at the 2016 Gymnastics Olympic Test Event. The Olympic test event featured all three disciplines in gymnastics. In artistic gymnastics the top four all-around teams will qualify along with eligible all-around individuals until the total quota of 97 men and 97 women have been met including continental representation. In trampoline eight quotas for each gender are available to the top eligible athletes, including continental representation. Two of these quotas are meant for the host Brazil and the tripartite though gender is not specified. In rhythmic gymnastics the top three all-around teams and the top nine all-around individuals, including continental representation will qualify. The Gymnastics Olympic Test Event was held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from April 16th to April 22nd 2016.

 

Artistic

In the men’s team all-around competition it was Germany whom led all nations with a score of 350.609. After a relatively weak floor performance the team posted top three results in all of the other apparatuses including a top performance in the parallel bars. Ukraine followed close behind with a final score of 350.160. The team had a good performance at the beginning including a very strong first place in the pommel horse, but ultimately lost pace to Germany. The other two nations which booked a team spot were the Netherlands who will compete in the men’s team event for the first time in its history and France. Inconsistencies including a horrible start on the pommel horse ultimately cost Spain a spot in the team event.

Nations which competed in the team event, but did not qualify are eligible to pick any athlete to compete at the Olympics. These nations are Romania, Spain, Belgium and Canada. Continental representation (1 for Oceania, 2 for other continents) was not met for Africa as only one athlete qualified through the test event. This meant the highest ranked African athlete from the 2015 World Championship, Algeria’s Mohamed Bourguieg qualified to the Olympics. Nations which had two athletes competing and both athletes finishing higher than the lowest ranked qualifier will have the opportunity to pick which one of the two athletes will compete. These nations are Colombia, Mexico and Hungary.

The following athletes are qualified to the Olympics based on the order from the individual all-around event; Andrey Likhovitskiy (Belarus), Alexander Shatilov (Isarael), Ferhat Arican (Turkey), Artur Davtyan (Armenia), Randy Leru (Cuba), Filip Ude (Croatia), Petro Pakhnyuk (Azerbaijan), Anton Fokin (Uzbekistan), Oskar Kirmes (Finland), Ludovico Edalli (Italy), Stian Skjerahaug (Norway), David Jessen (Czech Republic), Robert Tvorogal (Lithuania), Pham Phuoc Hung (Vietnam), Marios Georgiou (Cyprus), Kieran Behan (Ireland), Vlasios Maras (Greece), Gustavo Palma Simoes (Portugal), Mikhail Koudinoc (New Zealand), Ryan Patterson (South Africa), Tomas Gonzalez (Chile) and Lee Chih Kai (Chinese Taipei).

The women’s team all-around event was topped by Brazil whom finished with a score of 226.477. The team had a great performance, finishing first in the balance beam, floor and vault. Despite a poor performance on the uneven bars second place Germany was unable to close the gap completely, finishing with an overall score of 223.977. Also qualifying to the Olympics are Belgium and France. In one of the most shocking news in gymnastics Romania, medalists at every Olympics since 1976 will not be sending a team as a poor uneven bars contributed to their seventh place finish.

Nations which competed in the team event, but did not qualify are eligible to choose any athlete to compete at the Olympics. These nations are Australia, Switzerland, Romania and South Korea. Continental representation (1 for Oceania, 2 for the other continents) was not met for Africa as no athletes were qualified at the end of the test event. This meant the highest ranked African athletes from the 2015 World Championships, specifically; Algeria’s Farah Boufadene and South Africa’s Claudia Cummins have qualified to the Olympics. Nations which had two athletes competing and both athletes finishing higher than the lowest ranked qualifier will have the opportunity to pick which one of two athletes will compete. These nations are Greece, Hungary, Spain, Mexico and Poland.

The following athletes are qualified to the Olympics based on the order from the individual all-around event; Ana Sofia Gomez (Guatemala), Jessica Lopez Arocha (Venezuela), Angelina Kysla (Ukraine), Marcia Vidiaux (Cuba), Filipa Martins (Portugal), Lisa Ecker (Austria), Toni-Ann Williams (Jamaica), Irina Sazonova (Iceland), Phan Thu Ha Thanh (Vietnam), Dipa Karmakar (India), Barbora Mokosova (Slovakia), Courtney McGregor (New Zealand), Oksana Chusovitina (Uzbekistan), Houry Gebeshian (Armenia), Ariana Orrego (Peru), Simona Castro (Chile), Teja Belak (Slovenia), Tutya Yilmaz (Turkey), Emma Larsson (Sweden), Marisa Dick (Trinidad and Tobago), Ana Derek (Croatia), Catalina Escobar Gomez (Colombia), Kylie Dickson (Belarus), Ellis O’Reilly (Ireland) and Ailen Valente (Argentina).

 

Trampoline

The qualification round of the women’s trampoline was topped by Li Dan of China whom scored 102.480 after her two performances. In the final however, Li had a subpar performance and finished in fifth. The event was instead won by her compatriot Liu Lingling whom finished with a score of 55.485. China along with Belarus has already previously qualified to the Olympics while other nations were allowed to only qualify one athlete. The Olympic quotas went to Russia, Ukraine, Japan, Uzbekistan, Germany, Portugal and the United States. While the last spot is expected to go to a tripartite nation it will likely eventually be reallocated to the next best ranked nation, France.

Before the competition began Brazil declared that it will use its host quota on the men’s trampoline, leaving the men one fewer qualification spot. The qualification round of the men’s trampoline was topped by China’s Gao Lei whom scored 110.660 after his two performances. A mistake and a fall in the final cost Gao the event as he finished in eighth. The winner of the event was Belarus’ Uladzislau Hancharou whom finished with a score of 59.750. China along with Belarus has already previously qualified to the Olympics while other nations were allowed to only qualify one athlete. The Olympic quotas went to New Zealand, Portugal, United States, Great Britain, Australia, Canada and as mentioned before Brazil obtained a quota for being the host nation. While the last spot is currently reserved for a tripartite nation it could potentially be reallocation to the next best ranked nation, Kazakhstan.

 

Rhythmic

The qualification round of the individual all-around was led by Belarus’ Melitina Staniouta whom finished with the top score in all four rotations for a total of 72.215 points. However, Belarus has already qualified to the Olympics. The following athletes qualified to the Olympics; Sabina Ashirbayeva (Kazakhstan), Nicol Ruprecht (Austria), Veronica Berolini (Italy), Ekaterina Volkova (Finland), Anastasiya Serdyukova (Uzbekistan), Ana Luiza Filiorianu (Romania), Shang Rong (China) and Jana Berezko-Marggrander. Also since Oceania did not qualify an athlete Australia’s Danielle Prince has been given a continental quota. An African quota will be given either through the tripartite commission or through the best ranked athlete from the 2015 World Championships (South Africa). In addition Brazil announced that it will use its host quota on Natalia Gaudio. The final was again topped by Staniouta whom finished with a score of 70.749.

A direct final for the team all-around was held. Germany won the event by being the best team in the two rotations finishing with a score of 33.183. The other two Olympic quotas went to silver medalist Uzbekistan (32.832) and bronze medalist Greece (31.982).

This was the final opportunity for nations to qualify to the Olympics in gymnastics. All that is remaining is to decide on the tripartite places. Overall China and Russia will be sending the largest teams with 20 athletes each while Japan and the United States will also compete in all of the events.

 

Athletes by Nations

  • Germany – 16
  • France – 10
  • Uzbekistan – 9
  • Greece – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Belgium – 6
  • Brazil – 5
  • Netherlands – 5
  • Portugal – 4
  • Australia – 3
  • New Zealand – 3
  • Romania – 3
  • Algeria – 2
  • Armenia – 2
  • Austria – 2
  • Belarus – 2
  • Canada – 2
  • Chile – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Croatia – 2
  • Cuba – 2
  • Finland – 2
  • Hungary – 2
  • Ireland – 2
  • Italy – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Spain – 2
  • Turkey – 2
  • United States – 2
  • Vietnam – 2
  • Argentina – 1
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • China – 1
  • Chinese Taipei – 1
  • Cyprus – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Great Britain – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Iceland – 1
  • India – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Jamaica – 1
  • Japan – 1
  • Kazakhstan – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Poland – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Slovakia – 1
  • Slovenia – 1
  • South Korea – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • Switzerland – 1
  • Trinidad and Tobago – 1
  • Venezuela – 1

 

References

Fencing: European Zonal Tournament Qualify 12

12 nations qualified one athlete each at the 2016 European Fencing Olympic Zonal Tournament. The format had a group stage used to determine seeds where a single elimination tournament followed. For individual events with a team event (men’s epee, men’s foil, women’s epee, women’s sabre) the top ranked athlete qualified to the Olympics. For individual events without a team event (men’s sabre, women’s foil) the top four athletes qualified to the Olympics. The European Fencing Olympic Zonal Tournament was held in Prague, Czech Republic from April 16th to April 17th.

The men’s epee was won by Jiri Beran of the Czech Republic. In the final Beran defeated Austria’s Josef Mahringer in a close 15-13 match.

Since all of the semi-finalist qualifies to the Olympics in the women’s foil the quarter-finals were essentially the final for the event. Israel’s Delila Hatuel won the first quota by defeating Ukraine’s Olga Leleyko 15-11. Greece’s Aikaterini Kontochristopoulou went up against Great Britain’s Natalia Sheppard and prevailed. Turkey’s Irem Karamete booked her spot to the Olympics by defeating Netherlands’ Milja Mondt 15-10. The final spot went to Malina Calugareanu of Romania whom defeated Austria’s Olivia Wohlgemuth 15-9.

Similarly the men’s sabre qualification effectively ended during the quarter-final matches as all four semi-finalists qualified to the Olympics. Ukraine’s Andriy Yagodka won the first quota against Austria’s Mathias Willau 15-13. Georgia’s Sandro Bazadze defeated Israel’s Kostiantyn Voronov 15-12 to book his spot to the Olympics. Bulgaria’s Pancho Paskov defeated Great Britain’s James Honeybone 15-7. The final spot went to Belgium’s Seppe van Holsbeke whom defeated Turkey’s Enver Yildrim 15-7.

The women’s epee was won by Switzerland’s Tiffany Geroudet whom defeated Poland’s Renata Knapik-Miazga 15-7.

The final for the men’s foil was a close match between Austria’s Rene Pranz and Turkey’s Martino Minuto. Pranz won the match 15-14.

The women’s sabre was won by Azerbaijan’s Sabina Mikina whom defeated Belarus’ Palina Kaspiarovich 15-11.

This was the final opportunity for European nations to qualify in fencing to the Olympics. The final qualification event, the American Olympic zonal tournament should conclude later today.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Austria – 1
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • Belgium – 1
  • Bulgaria – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Georgia – 1
  • Greece – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Romania – 1
  • Switzerland – 1
  • Turkey – 1
  • Ukraine – 1

 

References