Archery: Final Olympic Qualifiers Adds 6 Teams and 11 Individuals

The final Olympic quotas were decided at the 2016 Archery World Cup – Stage 3. A special Final Olympic Qualification Tournament was held during the World Cup event. The top three nations from the team event of the Olympic qualification tournament qualified to the Olympics. In the individual event, initially three spots were available to the highest ranked athletes with a maximum of one quota per nation per gender, but should a nation whom qualified in the team event, previously qualified an individual quota that quota will be reallocated to the next highest ranked eligible athlete at this individual event. The Archery World Cup – Stage 3 was held in Antalya, Turkey from June 12th to June 19th 2016.

In the women’s team recurve Germany was the top nation in the ranking round, finishing with a score of 1991. However, they suffered an early upset to Estonia in the first round where Estonia won in an upset. Estonia would continue its unlikely run by defeating Great Britain 6-0 in the quarter-final. In the semi-final they were stopped by fifth seed Ukraine whom won the match 5-3. The other half of the bracket was relatively tame as both the second and third seed Italy and Chinese Taipei respectively faced off in the semi-final. The match went to a tie-breaker where Italy advanced to the final. Ukraine would go on to win the event with a 5-1 win over Italy. For third place and the final Olympic quota Chinese Taipei easily dispatched Estonia to win the match 6-0. Since Chinese Taipei, Italy and the Ukraine all qualified athletes previously the total amount of quotas for the women’s individual qualifiers will be six.

The men’s team recurve saw many upsets. After winning the top seed in the ranking round with a score of 2008 India quickly felt the pressure as the required a tie-breaker to defeat Turkey and then were eliminated in the quarter-final after losing a tie-breaker to Malaysia. Second seed Mexico lost 6-0 in the first round to Canada while fourth seed Russia lost to 12th seed Indonesia 5-3 in the quarter-final. In total the semi-finals consisted of 8th seed Malaysia, 12th seed Indonesia, 3rd seed Germany and 10th seed France. Indonesia booked their spot to the Olympics with a 6-0 victory over Malaysia while France qualified by defeating Germany 5-1. Indonesia would go on to win the event 6-0. The final Olympic quota was decided in the third place match where Malaysia defeated Germany 6-2. Since Indonesia and Malaysia qualified athletes previously the total amount of quotas for the men’s individual qualifiers will be five.

While there were relatively few upsets in the women’s individual recurve none of the top four seeds reached the semi-final though three of them reached the quarter-final. The first semi-final was between Moldova’s Alexandra Mirca and Great Britain’s Naomi Folkard. Folkard won the match 7-3. The other semi-final match was between Estonia’s Laura Nurmsalu and Sweden’s Christine Bjerendal. Nurmsalu won the match 6-4. All four nations qualified a quota to the Olympics. The event was won by Nurmsalu whom defeated Folkard 6-0. The other two Olympic quotas went to Finland (Taru Kuoppa) and Spain (Adriana Martin).

One of the largest upsets in the entire qualifier came in the men’s individual recurve in the round of 32 where 80th seed Boris Balaz of Slovakia defeated top seed Bair Tsybekdorzhiev of Russia in a 6-4 match. Balaz was unable to reach the semi-final as he lost to Thailand’s Witthaya Thamwong 6-2 in the quarter-finals, however, it would be enough to grab one of the Olympics quotas. The final was between two Belarussians where Anton Prilepov and Pavel Dalidovich faced off against each other. Prilepov won the match 6-0. Since a nation can only qualify one athlete quota the five quotas went to Belarus (Anton Prilepov), Thailand (Witthaya Thamwong), Belgium (Robin Ramaekers), Norway (Baard Nesteng) and Slovakia (Boris Balaz).

This was the final opportunity for nations to qualify to the Olympics. All that is left is for the tripartite quotas to be announced and for nations to officially confirm their quotas.

 

Athletes by Nations

  • Chinese Taipei – 3
  • France – 3
  • Indonesia – 3
  • Italy – 3
  • Malaysia – 3
  • Ukraine – 3
  • Belarus – 1
  • Belgium – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Great Britain – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Slovakia – 1
  • Spain – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • Thailand – 1

 

References

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Judo: Olympic Rankings Published 113 Nations Qualify

113 nations qualified through the Judo Olympic Rankings. Athletes earned points through various world and continental events over a two year period. There were two methods of qualifying. First the top 22 men and top 14 women qualify with a maximum of one NOC per weight class. Second are the continental qualifiers. The highest ranked, not yet qualified athletes across all events can qualify. Each continent has a set amount of quotas; Africa 24 (14 men, 10 women), Europe 25 (14 men, 11 women), Asia 20 (12 men, 8 women), Oceania 10 (7 men, 3 women), and Pan America 21 (13 men, 8 women). A nation can only earn one spot across all events through this and a single continent can qualify a maximum of two athletes in a single event. The qualification period lasted from May 30th 2014 to May 29th 2016.

In total 113 nations have qualified with France and Japan joining hosts Brazil as being the only nation to have qualified a full team of men and women. Also qualifying a full men’s team are Georgia, Germany, Mongolia, Russia, South Korea and Uzbekistan. Overall 53 nations only qualified through the continental rankings while 14 nations did not receive a continental quota. Oceania did not allocate all 10 of its continental quotas thus the unused quota was reallocated to the athlete with the most points and is not yet qualified among all events, specifically Uzbekistan’s Soyib Kurbonov in the men’s -100kg.

The quotas are tied to the athletes by name with the exception of where multiple athletes from the same nation finished in the top 22 for men and top 14 for women where the nation can choose from among them. All that is left to determine in judo is the tripartite quotas.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • France – 14
  • Japan – 14
  • Germany – 13
  • Mongolia – 13
  • South Korea – 12
  • Netherlands – 11
  • Russia – 11
  • Cuba – 9
  • Canada – 8
  • China – 8
  • Georgia – 8
  • Hungary – 8
  • Uzbekistan – 8
  • Australia – 7
  • Great Britain – 7
  • Israel – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Azerbaijan – 6
  • Portugal – 6
  • United States – 6
  • Algeria – 5
  • Austria – 5
  • Belgium – 5
  • Egypt – 5
  • Italy – 5
  • Kazakhstan – 5
  • Slovenia – 5
  • Spain – 5
  • Poland – 4
  • Romania – 4
  • Sweden – 4
  • Tunisia – 4
  • Turkey – 4
  • Czech Republic – 3
  • Ecuador – 3
  • Iran – 3
  • Morocco – 3
  • North Korea – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • United Arab Emirates – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Belarus – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Chinese Taipei – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Gabon – 2
  • Greece – 2
  • Kosovo – 2
  • Kyrgyzstan – 2
  • Latvia – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • Puerto Rico – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Tajikistan – 2
  • Turkmenistan – 2
  • American Samoa – 1
  • Angola – 1
  • Armenia – 1
  • Aruba – 1
  • Benin – 1
  • Bolivia – 1
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – 1
  • Burkina Faso – 1
  • Cameroon – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Congo – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Côte d’Ivoire – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Dominican Republic – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Fiji – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Gambia – 1
  • Ghana – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Guinea-Bissau – 1
  • Haiti – 1
  • Honduras – 1
  • Iceland – 1
  • India – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Jordan – 1
  • Kenya – 1
  • Lebanon – 1
  • Libya – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Madagascar – 1
  • Mali – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Mozambique – 1
  • Nauru – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Niger – 1
  • Pakistan – 1
  • Palau – 1
  • Papua New Guinea – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Samoa – 1
  • Saudi Arabia – 1
  • Senegal – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Seychelles – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Trinidad and Tobago – 1
  • Uruguay – 1
  • Vanuatu – 1
  • Venezuela – 1
  • Vietnam – 1
  • Zambia – 1

 

References

Shooting: Tripartite, Trading and Reallocations Announced

The International Sport Shooting Federation has updated its tripartite, traded quotas and the reallocation of some quotas. Originally 24 quotas were reserved for nations which have qualified less than an average of eight athletes to individual events over the past two Olympics. The quotas can be spread out over any of the 15 Olympic events.

In total 18 nations were granted tripartite quotas. Four nations were actually given two quotas; Bolivia (men’s 50m pistol and women’s 10m air rifle), Malta (men’s double trap and women’s 10m air pistol), Oman (men’s 50m rifle 3 positions, women’s 10m air pistol) and Pakistan (men’s 25m rapid fire pistol and women’s 10m air rifle). The 14 nations which received a single tripartite quota were; Andorra (women’s 10m air rifle), Angola (men’s trap), Bangladesh (men’s 10m air rifle), Barbados (men’s skeet), Bhutan (women’s 10m air rifle), Bosnia and Herzegovina (women’s 10m air rifle), Iraq (women’s 10m air rifle), Kosovo (women’s 10m air rifle), Lebanon (women’s trap), Macedonia (women’s 10m air rifle), Nicaragua (men’s 10m air pistol), Panama (men’s 10m air pistol), Paraguay (men’s double trap) and Sri Lanka (men’s 50m rifle prone).

In shooting nations are allowed to trade one of their athlete quotas to another. A nation can only do this once. In total 12 nations have traded quotas; Egypt (women’s 50m rifle 3 positions to men’s trap), India (men’s 50m rifle 3 positions to men’s trap), Italy (men’s 50m pistol to men’s 25m rapid fire pistol), Kazakhstan (men’s trap to women’s trap), South Korea (men’s 10m air pistol to women’s 10m air rifle), Qatar (men’s 50m rifle 3 positions to men’s skeet), Russia (women’s 10m air pistol to women’s skeet), Slovenia (women’s 10m air pistol to women’s 10m air rifle), Sweden (women’s 10m air rifle to men’s double trap) and Switzerland (women’s 10m air rifle to men’s 50m rifle 3 positions). China and Germany also traded quotas, but they also declined a quota due to a single athlete qualifying in two events despite the nation owning two athlete quotas thus we don’t know the trade. Regardless China has lost an athlete quota in men’s 50m pistol and women’s 50m rifle 3 positions and gained an athlete quota in men’s 50m rifle prone. Similarly Germany lost quotas in men’s 50m rifle 3 positions and women’s 10m air rifle and gained an athlete quota in women’s 25m pistol.

The ISSF also announced some reallocations of quotas. Reallocated quotas go to the nation with the most athletes which have attained the MQS, but did not qualify any athlete quotas during the qualification process. In total there were seven reallocated quotas, two from unused tripartite quotas, three through unqualified quotas from the continental qualifiers and two from nations which have declined athlete quotas, specifically China and Germany. The reallocated quotas went to; Azerbaijan (men’s 25m rapid fire pistol), Bahrain (men’s 50m rifle prone), Colombia (men’s trap), Estonia (men’s 25m rapid fire pistol), Lithuania (men’s skeet), Romania (men’s 10m air rifle) and Uzbekistan (men’s 10m air rifle). Technically the Netherlands was initially given a spot, but it was declined.

It is expected that a few more reallocation quotas will be given out as nations begin to finalize their teams. Similarly we can also expect more traded athlete quotas.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Bolivia – 2
  • Malta – 2
  • Oman – 2
  • Pakistan – 2
  • Andorra – 1
  • Angola – 1
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • Bahrain – 1
  • Bangladesh – 1
  • Barbados – 1
  • Bhutan – 1
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – 1
  • Colombia – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Kosovo – 1
  • Lebanon – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Macedonia – 1
  • Nicaragua – 1
  • Panama – 1
  • Paraguay – 1
  • Romania – 1
  • Sri Lanka – 1
  • Uzbekistan – 1

 

References

Badminton: Tripartite Quotas Announced

Badminton World Federation has announced the tripartite quotas for badminton. Tripartite quotas are given to nations which have qualified less than an average of eight athletes in individual events over the past two Olympics. Originally three men’s singles and three women’s singles spots were available, however, only the men’s quotas were given out. Sri Lanka’s Niluka Karunaratne, Suriname’s Soren Opti and Brunei’s Jaspar Yu were the athletes selected to compete in the men’s singles.

The tripartite quotas for the women’s singles have since been reallocated to the next highest ranked athletes in the Olympic Rankings. Specifically the following athletes qualified to the Olympics; Estonia’s Kati Tolmoff, Hungary’s Laura Sarosi and Lithuania’s Akvile Stapusaityte.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Brunei – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Sri Lanka – 1
  • Suriname – 1

 

References

Triathlon: Qualified Nations List Released

The International Triathlon Union has published its Olympic Qualification List filling out the qualified nations through the Olympic Rankings, Olympic Points List and tripartite nations. The Olympic Rankings and Olympic Points List consisted of approved events including World Championship, Continental Championship and other world events. The top eight nations were allowed to qualify three athletes per gender through the Olympic rankings including the quotas obtained through the continental qualifiers and world qualification event. All other nations were allowed to qualify a maximum of two. Originally the top 39 eligible athletes from the Olympic Rankings qualified their nation to the Olympics, however, reallocations has increased that number. The Olympic Points List gave one quota to each of the five continents to athletes whose nations have yet to qualify in triathlon, provided that they met the minimum ranking of 140. For the tripartite commission, two men’s and two women’s quotas were available to athletes from nations whom have qualified an average of 8 or less athletes from individual events over the past two Olympics. They too had to meet the minimum ranking requirements. The Olympic Rankings and Olympic Points List were created using results from various events from May 15th 2014 to May 15th 2016.

In the men’s race a total of 23 nations qualified through the Olympic Rankings. They include Argentina (2), Australia (2), Azerbaijan, Belgium (2), Brazil, Canada (2), Costa Rica, Denmark, France (2), Germany (2), Great Britain (2), Hungary, Ireland, Italy (2), Mexico, Norway, New Zealand (2), Portugal (2), Russia (3), Slovakia, Spain (2), Switzerland and the United States (3). Since Brazil was among the qualified nations its host quota has been reallocated to Israel. Only one tripartite quota was awarded to Jordan which meant the other quota place was reallocated to Mexico. The Olympic Points List gave quotas to Austria, Barbados and China. Since there were no eligible nations in Africa and Oceania the quotas were reallocated to Hungary and Portugal.

In the women’s race a total of 25 nations qualified through the Olympic Rankings. They include Australia (2), Austria (2), Belgium, Bermuda, Brazil, Canada (2), Czech Republic, France, Germany (3), Great Britain, Hungary (2), Ireland, Italy (2), Japan (2), Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand (3), Poland, Russia (2), Slovenia, South Africa, Spain (3), Switzerland, Ukraine and the United States (2). Since Brazil was among the qualified nations its host quota has been reallocated to the Netherlands. No tripartite quota was awarded in the women’s race meaning the quotas have been reallocated to Belgium and Sweden. The Olympic Points List gave quotas to China, Ecuador, Estonia and Mauritius. Since there were no eligible nations in Oceania the quota was reallocated to Canada.

Overall the eight nations which will send three athletes in the men’s race are Australia, France, Great Britain, Mexico, Portugal, Russia, Spain and the United States. For the women the nations are Australia, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Japan, New Zealand, Spain and the United States. As a reminder this is a provisional list and is subjected to the approval of nations so there is the potential for reallocation.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Canada – 5
  • Germany – 5
  • New Zealand – 5
  • Russia – 5
  • Spain – 5
  • United States – 5
  • Australia – 4
  • Belgium – 4
  • Hungary – 4
  • Italy – 4
  • Austria – 3
  • France – 3
  • Great Britain – 3
  • Mexico – 3
  • Portugal – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Brazil – 2
  • China – 2
  • Ireland – 2
  • Japan – 2
  • Netherlands – 2
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • Barbados – 1
  • Bermuda – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Denmark – 1
  • Ecuador – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Jordan – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Poland – 1
  • Slovakia – 1
  • Slovenia – 1
  • South Africa – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • Ukraine – 1

 

References

Badminton: Olympic Qualification Rankings Released

With the final update of the Olympic Badminton Rankings the initial lists of qualified athletes have been announced. The Olympic Badminton Rankings included tournaments such as the World Championships, Continental Championships, Grand Prixes and others. The ranking period for the Olympic Badminton Rankings were from May 5th 2015 to May 1st 2016.

The top 34 athletes in the single rankings qualified to the Olympics. However, there is a maximum of two athletes per nation if both athletes are in the top 16 in the overall rankings. If not the maximum quota for each nation is one. Also all five continents must be represented with the highest ranking athlete from the continent automatically qualifying. The tripartite quotas also count towards the continental representation.

For the doubles rankings the top 16 teams qualified to the Olympics. Similarly, there is a maximum of two teams per nation if both teams are in the top 8 in the overall rankings. If not the maximum quota for each nation is one team. Also all continents that have at least one team in the top 50 will be granted a spot to the Olympics.

Overall China qualified the most quotas, winning the maximum of two entrants in all five events. In addition Denmark, Germany, Great Britain, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea and the United States have at least one qualified entrant in all five events. In total, 41 nations have qualified at least one athlete.

There have been some reallocations due to the same athlete competing in two events. For the men China’s Zhang Nan, Germany’s Michael Fuchs and United States’ Phillip Chew have qualified in both the men’s doubles and mixed doubles. Brazil also qualified through the men’s singles releasing its host quota. These quotas will be reallocated to the men’s singles benefitting Portugal’s Pedro Martins, Austria’s David Obernorsterer, Canada’s Martin Giuffre and Czech Republic’s Petr Koukal.

Similarly China’s Zhao Yunlei, Denmark’s Christinna Pedersen and Netherlands’ Selena Piek qualified both in the women’s doubles and mixed doubles. These extra quotas will be reallocated to the women’s singles benefitting Switzerland’s Sabrina Jaquet, Ireland’s Chloe Magee and Portugal’s Telma Santos.

Also Australia will have to give up two of its continental quotas due to the rule allowing a nation to only benefit from a maximum of two continental quotas. The quotas will be reallocated to the next best eligible nation from Oceania first. If there are no eligible nations it will be reallocated to the next best ranked eligible nation regardless of continent.

Confirmation of quotas and tripartite invitations still remain so there will be a few changes between now and at the beginning of the Olympics, but for the most part the majority of athletes here will compete at the Olympics.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • China – 10
  • South Korea – 9
  • Denmark – 6
  • Indonesia – 6
  • Japan – 6
  • Germany – 5
  • Great Britain – 5
  • Hong Kong – 5
  • India – 5
  • Malaysia – 5
  • Thailand – 5
  • United States – 5
  • Australia – 4
  • Poland – 3
  • Russia – 3
  • Chinese Taipei – 3
  • Austria – 2
  • Belgium – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Canada – 2
  • Czech Republic – 2
  • France – 2
  • Ireland – 2
  • Netherlands – 2
  • Portugal – 2
  • Singapore – 2
  • Spain – 2
  • Ukraine – 2
  • Vietnam – 2
  • Cuba – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Italy – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • South Africa – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • Switzerland – 1
  • Turkey – 1

 

References

Wrestling: Eastern European Nations Top European Qualifiers

Bulgaria, Poland and Ukraine led all nations in qualifying at the 2016 European Wresting Olympic Qualification Tournament. The top two athletes from each weight class qualified their nation to the Olympics. The European Wrestling Qualification Tournament was held in Zrenjanin, Serbia from April 15th to April 17th 2016.

Each day had two men’s freestyle, two women’s freestyle and two Greco-Roman events. The first day was led by Bulgaria and Poland whom qualified two athletes each. 2015 World Championship bronze medalist Vladimir Dubov of Bulgaria won the men’s freestyle -57kg over Armenia’s Garnik Mnatsakanyan 10-0. Dubov’s compatriot Elitsa Yankova also won her event, the women’s freestyle -48kg over Romania’s Alina Vuc in a 3-2 match. Poland’s Katarzyna Krawczyk defeated Germany’s Nina Hemmer in the women’s freestyle -53kg 10-0. Krawczyk’s compatriot Magomedmurad Gadzhiev gave Poland its second gold medal after he defeated Ukraine’s Andriy Kvyatkovskyi 4-0 in the men’s freestyle -65kg. 2012 Olympic silver medalist Tamas Lorincz of Hungary won his event by defeating Georgia’s Shmagi Bolkvadze 4-1 in the men’s Greco-Roman -66kg. The final event was won by Russia’s Sanal Semenov over Serbia’s Kristijan Fris in the men’s Greco-Roman -59kg via a score of 8-0.

On the second day Russia completed its Greco-Roman team with Aleksey Mishin winning the -85kg over Bulgaria’s Nikolay Bayryakov 3-1. Russia also qualified a second quota of the day in the women’s freestyle -63kg. However, Anastasia Bratchikova lost to Belarus’ Maryia Mamashuk 4-2. In the women’s freestyle -58kg Bulgaria’s Mimi Hristova defeated 2015 World -60kg gold medalist Oksana Herhel of Ukraine 5-2. After ensuring there spot to the Olympics two final matches ended in walkovers. The men’s Greco-Roman -75kg where Serbia’s Viktor Nemes won over Zurab Datunashvili of Georgia and the men’s freestyle -86kg where Hungary’s Istvan Vereb won over Amarhajy Mahamedau of Belarus. The final event was won by Azerbaijan’s Jabrayil Hasanov over Georgia’s Jakob Makarashvili 11-0.

On the final day Estonia won two gold medals in the Greco-Roman events. Ardo Arusaar defeated Hungary’s Adam Varga 3-1 in the Greco-Roman 98kg while 2012 Olympic silver medalist Heiki Navi defeated Germany’s Eduard Popp 3-0 in the Greco-Roman -130kg. Poland defeated Turkey in two finals; Radoslaw Baran defeated Ibrahim Bolukbasi 3-1 in the men’s freestyle -97kg while Agnieszka Wieszczek defeated Buse Tosun 9-5 in the women’s freestyle -69kg. Turkey did still win a gold medal in the women’s freestyle -75kg where Yasemin Adar won over Ukraine’s Alla Cherkasova in a walkover. The final event was won by Ukraine’s Alen Zasyeyev who won in a walkover against Belarus’ Yusup Jalilau.

Unqualified athletes will still have two more chances at qualifying at one of the two final qualification tournaments. The first one is scheduled for next week while the other will occur during the beginning of May.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Bulgaria – 4
  • Poland – 4
  • Ukraine – 4
  • Belarus – 3
  • Georgia – 3
  • Hungary – 3
  • Russia – 3
  • Turkey – 3
  • Estonia – 2
  • Germany – 2
  • Serbia – 2
  • Armenia – 1
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • Romania – 1

 

References