Tennis: ITF Updates Qualified List Again

With several late withdrawals in tennis the list of qualified athletes has changed again. In total 56 nations will send at least one athlete. As a reminder mixed doubles will be made up of athletes which have qualified in other events.

 

Athletes by Nations

  • United States – 11
  • France – 9
  • Spain – 9
  • Germany – 8
  • Russia – 8
  • Australia – 7
  • Brazil – 7
  • Czech Republic – 7
  • Great Britain – 7
  • Italy – 7
  • Poland – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Argentina – 6
  • Japan – 6
  • Romania – 6
  • Serbia – 6
  • China – 5
  • Chinese Taipei – 5
  • Canada – 4
  • Croatia – 4
  • India – 4
  • Slovakia – 4
  • Belgium – 3
  • Colombia – 3
  • Netherlands – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • Austria – 2
  • Belarus – 2
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Chile – 2
  • Hungary – 2
  • Kazakhstan – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • New Zealand – 2
  • Portugal – 2
  • Thailand – 2
  • Tunisia – 2
  • Barbados – 1
  • Denmark – 1
  • Dominican Republic – 1
  • Georgia – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Latvia – 1
  • Liechtenstein – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Luxembourg – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Montenegro – 1
  • Paraguay – 1
  • Puerto Rico – 1
  • Slovenia – 1
  • Sweden – 1
  • Turkey – 1
  • Uruguay – 1
  • Uzbekistan – 1

 

Reference

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Team Preview: Slovenia

Note: Last minute changes are always possible

Slovenia is a nation located in Southern Central Europe. The nation made its first Summer Olympics appearance as an independent nation in 1992. Before Slovenia participated under the Austrian flag during the 1912 Olympics and then under Yugoslavia from 1920 to 1988. As an independent nation Slovenia has won a total of 19 medals at the Summer Olympics across seven sports. 2012 saw Slovenia finish with four medals, including one gold, just one medal shy from its record at the 2008 Olympics. Overall Slovenia will be looking at having a similar performance with potential medals coming from sports such as canoeing and judo.

While Slovenia has only won a single medal in canoeing in its history (silver in 1996) they could potentially challenge for multiple medals in Rio. Leading the group is 2015 World Championship silver medalist Benjamin Savsek whom will compete in his second Olympics in the men’s C1 slalom. In the men’s K1 slalom Peter Kauzer will compete in his third Olympics with hopes of improving his sixth place finish in 2012. Also returning from 2012 are 2016 European Championship silver medalists Luka Bozic and Saso Taljat whom will compete in the men’s C2 slalom. Rounding out the slalom team is 2016 European Championship silver medalist Ursa Kragelj whom will compete in the women’s K1 slalom. In sprint canoe Slovenia will compete with one athlete, 2008 and 2012 Olympian Spela Ponomarenko whom will compete in the women’s K1 200m and 500m.

Slovenia will also send a strong judo team. The team will be led by 2015 World Championship gold medalist Tina Trstenjak in the women’s -63kg. Also on the team is 2015 World Championship silver medalist Anamari Velensek whom will compete in her second Olympics in the women’s -78kg. Competing in his third Olympics is 2015 European Games bronze medalist Rok Draksic in the men’s -73kg. Completing the team are Adrian Gomboc in the men’s -66kg and Mihael Zgank in the men’s -90kg.

In team sports Slovenia will be competing in the men’s handball tournament. This will be the team’s third appearance to the Olympics as an independent nation. While they haven’t reached the heights of the former Yugoslavia team recently Slovenia has produced some great results. At the 2013 World Championship they finished in fourth while at the 2015 World Championship they reached the quarter-final. While not a favourite to win a medal Slovenia could be considered a dark horse going into the tournament.

The only returning Olympic medalist comes from sailing where Vasilij Zbogar will compete in the men’s Finn in his fifth Olympics. Zbogar was the 2004 bronze and 2008 silver medalist in the men’s laser. For the 2012 Olympics he switched to the Finn class and finished in sixth. Recently he won bronze at the 2015 World Championship and will be looking to add to his collection. Joining him will be 2012 Olympian Tina Mrak whom will join up with a new partner, Veronika Macarol in the women’s 470.

The swimming team will be anchored by veteran Anja Klinar whom will be competing in her fourth Olympics. She will compete in the women’s 400m freestyle, 200m butterfly and 400m individual medley. In addition she will also compete in the 4x200m freestyle relay along with Tjasa Oder, Tjasa Pintar and Janja Segel. Oder, a 2012 Olympian and 2016 European Championship bronze medalist will also compete in the women’s 800m freestyle while Damir Dugonjic whom will compete in his third Olympics will compete in the men’s 100m breaststroke. Other returning athletes include 2012 Olympians Tjasa Vozel (women’s 100m breaststroke) and Robert Zbogar (men’s 200m butterfly). Also competing are Anze Tavcar (men’s 100m freestyle) and Martin Bau (men’s 1500m freestyle) and outside of the pool Spela Perse will compete in the women’s 10km open water.

In athletics Slovenia will be sending a relative young team. The veteran of the group is 2008 and 2012 Olympian Martina Ratej whom will compete in the women’s javelin. Other returning athletes include 2008 Olympian Sabina Viet (women’s 200m) and 2012 Olympian Tina Sutej (women’s pole vault). Everyone else will be competing in their first Olympics though Zan Rudolf (men’s 800m) competed at the 2010 Youth Olympics. The remaining members of the team include Marusa Cernjul (women’s high jump), Daneja Grandovec (women’s marathon), Luka Janezic (men’s 400m), Anton Kosmac (men’s marathon), Maja Mihalinec (women’s 200m) and Robert Renner (men’s pole vault).

Slovenia will compete in two disciplines in cycling. On the road 2008 Olympian Simon Spilak will get to compete in his second Olympics in the men’s road race. Joining him are Matej Mohoric, Jan Polanc and Primoz Roglic. Roglic will also compete in the men’s time trial. In the women’s road race Polona Batagelj will compete in her second Olympics. In mountain biking 2012 Olympian Tanja Zakelj will compete in the women’s cross-country.

Returning athletes include shooters Ziva Dvorsak (women’s 10m air rifle, 50m rifle 3 positions) and Bostjan Macek (men’s trap) whom are competing in their second Olympics, table tennis player Bojan Tokic (men’s singles) will participate in his third Olympics while triathlete Mateja Simic (women’s race) will participate in her second. Slovenia will also compete in artistic gymnastics (Teja Belak, women’s events).

Overall Slovenia will compete with 59 athletes in 11 sports. This will be Slovenia’s smallest delegation of athletes at a Summer Olympics since 1996.

Swimming: China Tops Marathon Swimming Olympic Qualifiers

China won gold in both events at the 2016 Marathon Swimming Olympic Qualifier. In each event the top 10 highest ranked athletes, with a maximum of one athlete per nation qualified to the Olympics. Similarly the highest ranked eligible athlete from each continent also qualified to the Olympics. The Marathon Swimming Olympic Qualifier was held in Setubal, Portugal from June 11th to June 12th 2016.

In the women’s 10km race it was China’s Yan Siyu whom led the pack for the first two laps. She would go on to lose the lead with Poland’s Joanna Zachoszcz leading at the end of the third lap and her compatriot Xin Xin leading in the fourth and fifth laps, but she remained within the lead group. Going into the sixth and final lap the lead group was numbered at about 10. During the final lap three swimmers; Xin Xin, Great Britain’s Keri-Anne Payne and Ecuador’s Samantha Arevalo broke away and had a sprint swim towards the finish line where Xin finished ahead of Payne with a time of 1:55:12.1, just 0.8 seconds ahead. Arevalo won the bronze medal.

The top 10 eligible swimmers which qualified to the Olympics were;  Xin Xin (China), Keri-Anne Payne (Great Britain), Samantha Arevalo (Ecuador), Chelsea Gubecka (Australia), Yumi Kida (Japan), Michelle Weber (South Africa), Joanna Zachoszcz (Poland), Paola Perez (Venezuela), Spela Perse (Slovenia) and Jana Pechanova (Czech Republic). The five continental qualifiers were Erika Villaecija (Spain), Stephanie Horner (Canada), Heidi Gan (Malaysia), Charlotte Webby (New Zealand) and Reem Kaseem (Egypt).

The men’s 10km race saw multiple lead changes and had a lead group of about 20 athletes going into the final lap. As the final lap progressed the number of athletes in the lead group dwindled, until only China’s Zu Lijun remained as he won the race with a time of 1:52:18.2. 2.2 second later Germany’s Christian Reichert won the silver while Ecuador’s Ivan Enderica Ochoa won the bronze.

The top 10 eligible swimmers which qualified to the Olympics were; Zu Lijun (China), Christian Reichert (Germany), Ivan Enderica Ochoa (Ecuador), Evgenii Drattcev (Russia), Ous Mellouli (Tunisia), Richard Nagy (Slovakia), Jarrod Poort (Australia), Yasunari Hirai (Japan), Chad Ho (South Africa) and Ventsislav Aydarski (Bulgaria). The five continental qualifiers were Mark Papp (Hungary), Erwin Maldonado (Venezuela), Kane Radford (New Zealand), Vitaliy Khudyakov (Kazakhstan) and Marwan Elamrawy (Egypt).

This was the final opportunity to qualify in marathon swimming. Swimmers can still attempt to qualify to the pool events by reaching the qualification times.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Australia – 2
  • China – 2
  • Ecuador – 2
  • Egypt – 2
  • Japan – 2
  • New Zealand – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Venezuela – 2
  • Bulgaria – 1
  • Canada – 1
  • Czech Republic – 1
  • Germany – 1
  • Great Britain – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Kazakhstan – 1
  • Malaysia – 1
  • Poland – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Slovakia – 1
  • Slovenia – 1
  • Spain – 1
  • Tunisia – 1

 

References

Judo: Olympic Rankings Published 113 Nations Qualify

113 nations qualified through the Judo Olympic Rankings. Athletes earned points through various world and continental events over a two year period. There were two methods of qualifying. First the top 22 men and top 14 women qualify with a maximum of one NOC per weight class. Second are the continental qualifiers. The highest ranked, not yet qualified athletes across all events can qualify. Each continent has a set amount of quotas; Africa 24 (14 men, 10 women), Europe 25 (14 men, 11 women), Asia 20 (12 men, 8 women), Oceania 10 (7 men, 3 women), and Pan America 21 (13 men, 8 women). A nation can only earn one spot across all events through this and a single continent can qualify a maximum of two athletes in a single event. The qualification period lasted from May 30th 2014 to May 29th 2016.

In total 113 nations have qualified with France and Japan joining hosts Brazil as being the only nation to have qualified a full team of men and women. Also qualifying a full men’s team are Georgia, Germany, Mongolia, Russia, South Korea and Uzbekistan. Overall 53 nations only qualified through the continental rankings while 14 nations did not receive a continental quota. Oceania did not allocate all 10 of its continental quotas thus the unused quota was reallocated to the athlete with the most points and is not yet qualified among all events, specifically Uzbekistan’s Soyib Kurbonov in the men’s -100kg.

The quotas are tied to the athletes by name with the exception of where multiple athletes from the same nation finished in the top 22 for men and top 14 for women where the nation can choose from among them. All that is left to determine in judo is the tripartite quotas.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • France – 14
  • Japan – 14
  • Germany – 13
  • Mongolia – 13
  • South Korea – 12
  • Netherlands – 11
  • Russia – 11
  • Cuba – 9
  • Canada – 8
  • China – 8
  • Georgia – 8
  • Hungary – 8
  • Uzbekistan – 8
  • Australia – 7
  • Great Britain – 7
  • Israel – 7
  • Ukraine – 7
  • Azerbaijan – 6
  • Portugal – 6
  • United States – 6
  • Algeria – 5
  • Austria – 5
  • Belgium – 5
  • Egypt – 5
  • Italy – 5
  • Kazakhstan – 5
  • Slovenia – 5
  • Spain – 5
  • Poland – 4
  • Romania – 4
  • Sweden – 4
  • Tunisia – 4
  • Turkey – 4
  • Czech Republic – 3
  • Ecuador – 3
  • Iran – 3
  • Morocco – 3
  • North Korea – 3
  • Switzerland – 3
  • United Arab Emirates – 3
  • Argentina – 2
  • Belarus – 2
  • Bulgaria – 2
  • Chinese Taipei – 2
  • Colombia – 2
  • Gabon – 2
  • Greece – 2
  • Kosovo – 2
  • Kyrgyzstan – 2
  • Latvia – 2
  • Mexico – 2
  • Puerto Rico – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Tajikistan – 2
  • Turkmenistan – 2
  • American Samoa – 1
  • Angola – 1
  • Armenia – 1
  • Aruba – 1
  • Benin – 1
  • Bolivia – 1
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – 1
  • Burkina Faso – 1
  • Cameroon – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Congo – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Côte d’Ivoire – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • Dominican Republic – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Fiji – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Gambia – 1
  • Ghana – 1
  • Guatemala – 1
  • Guinea-Bissau – 1
  • Haiti – 1
  • Honduras – 1
  • Iceland – 1
  • India – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Jordan – 1
  • Kenya – 1
  • Lebanon – 1
  • Libya – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Madagascar – 1
  • Mali – 1
  • Mauritius – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Mozambique – 1
  • Nauru – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Niger – 1
  • Pakistan – 1
  • Palau – 1
  • Papua New Guinea – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Qatar – 1
  • Samoa – 1
  • Saudi Arabia – 1
  • Senegal – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Seychelles – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Trinidad and Tobago – 1
  • Uruguay – 1
  • Vanuatu – 1
  • Venezuela – 1
  • Vietnam – 1
  • Zambia – 1

 

References

Cycling Road: Women’s Olympic Rankings Published

The Union Cycliste Internationale has published the Women’s Olympic Qualification Rankings which are used to allocate the majority of competitors in women’s road race and time trial. Athletes can earn points for their nation in UCI approved events. For the women’s road race initially the top 5 nations earn four athlete quotas, nations ranked 6th to 13th earn three quotas and nations ranked 14th to 22nd earn two quotas. However, if an athlete is ranked in the top 100 in the individual rankings and their nation did not qualify through the nation rankings they will earn their nation a maximum of one quota. The quota is subtracted from the lowest ranked nations (those nations can only lose a maximum of one quota). For the time trial the top 15 nations from the rankings will be allowed to send one athlete which has qualified from the road race. The Women’s Olympic Qualification Rankings are calculated from various events held from June 1st 2015 to May 31st 2016.

For the women’s road race the women’s individual rankings contained 12 nations where athletes finished in the top 100, but their nation did not finished in the top 22 in the nation rankings. They are Chinese Taipei (Huang Ting Ying), Norway (Emile Moberg), Brazil (Flavia Oliveira), Azerbaijan (Olena Pavlukhina), Thailand (Jutatip Maneephan), Austria (Martina Ritter), Slovenia (Polana Batagelj), Lithuania (Daiva Tuslaite), Cyprus (Antri Christoforou), Israel (Shani Bloch), Japan (Mayuko Hagiwara) and Chile (Paola Munoz). This has caused nations ranked from 11 to 22 to lose one quota. Netherlands, United States, Italy, Australia and Germany qualified four athlete quotas. Poland, Sweden, Great Britain, Canada and Belgium qualified three athlete quotas. France, South Africa and Luxembourg qualified two athlete quotas. Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Finland, Cuba, New Zealand, Mexico, Switzerland and Spain qualified one athlete quota. Since Cuba qualified through the nation rankings its continental qualifier quota was reallocated to the next best ranked eligible nation from the Pan American qualifier, specifically Venezuela. Also since Brazil qualified one quota through the rankings one of their host quota will be reallocated to the highest ranked nation not yet qualified, Colombia.

The nations which qualified through the women’s time trial are as follows; Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, South Africa, Sweden, Ukraine and the United States. As a reminder these nations do not gain an athlete quota, they must use athletes which were qualified from the road race. Due to this rule both the Czech Republic and Russia which qualified quotas from the 2015 World Championship do not have enough athletes to fill that spot. The quotas have now been reallocated to the next highest eligible ranked nation from the event, specifically Japan and Sweden.

This was the final opportunity for nations to qualify to the Olympics in all disciplines of cycling. All that is left is for nations to confirm the quotas in which they were given.

 

Athletes by Nations

  • Australia – 4
  • Germany – 4
  • Italy – 4
  • Netherlands – 4
  • United States – 4
  • Belgium – 3
  • Canada – 3
  • Great Britain – 3
  • Poland – 3
  • Sweden – 3
  • France – 2
  • Luxembourg – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Austria – 1
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Brazil – 1
  • Chile – 1
  • Chinese Taipei – 1
  • Colombia – 1
  • Cuba – 1
  • Cyprus – 1
  • Finland – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Japan – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Mexico – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Russia – 1
  • Slovenia – 1
  • Spain – 1
  • Switzerland – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Ukraine – 1

 

References

Shooting: Tripartite, Trading and Reallocations Announced

The International Sport Shooting Federation has updated its tripartite, traded quotas and the reallocation of some quotas. Originally 24 quotas were reserved for nations which have qualified less than an average of eight athletes to individual events over the past two Olympics. The quotas can be spread out over any of the 15 Olympic events.

In total 18 nations were granted tripartite quotas. Four nations were actually given two quotas; Bolivia (men’s 50m pistol and women’s 10m air rifle), Malta (men’s double trap and women’s 10m air pistol), Oman (men’s 50m rifle 3 positions, women’s 10m air pistol) and Pakistan (men’s 25m rapid fire pistol and women’s 10m air rifle). The 14 nations which received a single tripartite quota were; Andorra (women’s 10m air rifle), Angola (men’s trap), Bangladesh (men’s 10m air rifle), Barbados (men’s skeet), Bhutan (women’s 10m air rifle), Bosnia and Herzegovina (women’s 10m air rifle), Iraq (women’s 10m air rifle), Kosovo (women’s 10m air rifle), Lebanon (women’s trap), Macedonia (women’s 10m air rifle), Nicaragua (men’s 10m air pistol), Panama (men’s 10m air pistol), Paraguay (men’s double trap) and Sri Lanka (men’s 50m rifle prone).

In shooting nations are allowed to trade one of their athlete quotas to another. A nation can only do this once. In total 12 nations have traded quotas; Egypt (women’s 50m rifle 3 positions to men’s trap), India (men’s 50m rifle 3 positions to men’s trap), Italy (men’s 50m pistol to men’s 25m rapid fire pistol), Kazakhstan (men’s trap to women’s trap), South Korea (men’s 10m air pistol to women’s 10m air rifle), Qatar (men’s 50m rifle 3 positions to men’s skeet), Russia (women’s 10m air pistol to women’s skeet), Slovenia (women’s 10m air pistol to women’s 10m air rifle), Sweden (women’s 10m air rifle to men’s double trap) and Switzerland (women’s 10m air rifle to men’s 50m rifle 3 positions). China and Germany also traded quotas, but they also declined a quota due to a single athlete qualifying in two events despite the nation owning two athlete quotas thus we don’t know the trade. Regardless China has lost an athlete quota in men’s 50m pistol and women’s 50m rifle 3 positions and gained an athlete quota in men’s 50m rifle prone. Similarly Germany lost quotas in men’s 50m rifle 3 positions and women’s 10m air rifle and gained an athlete quota in women’s 25m pistol.

The ISSF also announced some reallocations of quotas. Reallocated quotas go to the nation with the most athletes which have attained the MQS, but did not qualify any athlete quotas during the qualification process. In total there were seven reallocated quotas, two from unused tripartite quotas, three through unqualified quotas from the continental qualifiers and two from nations which have declined athlete quotas, specifically China and Germany. The reallocated quotas went to; Azerbaijan (men’s 25m rapid fire pistol), Bahrain (men’s 50m rifle prone), Colombia (men’s trap), Estonia (men’s 25m rapid fire pistol), Lithuania (men’s skeet), Romania (men’s 10m air rifle) and Uzbekistan (men’s 10m air rifle). Technically the Netherlands was initially given a spot, but it was declined.

It is expected that a few more reallocation quotas will be given out as nations begin to finalize their teams. Similarly we can also expect more traded athlete quotas.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • Bolivia – 2
  • Malta – 2
  • Oman – 2
  • Pakistan – 2
  • Andorra – 1
  • Angola – 1
  • Azerbaijan – 1
  • Bahrain – 1
  • Bangladesh – 1
  • Barbados – 1
  • Bhutan – 1
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – 1
  • Colombia – 1
  • Estonia – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Kosovo – 1
  • Lebanon – 1
  • Lithuania – 1
  • Macedonia – 1
  • Nicaragua – 1
  • Panama – 1
  • Paraguay – 1
  • Romania – 1
  • Sri Lanka – 1
  • Uzbekistan – 1

 

References

Cycling Mountain: Cross-Country Olympic Rankings Published

The UCI Olympic Qualification Rankings have been published. The rankings consisted of the combined point total obtained by a nation’s top three athletes at select world and continental events over the past two years. For the men’s rankings nations ranked 1st-5th qualified three athletes, 6th-13th qualified two athletes and 14th-23rd qualified one athlete. For the women’s rankings nations ranked 1st-8th qualified two athletes and 9th-17th qualified one athlete. The UCI Olympic Qualification Ranking period lasted from May 25th 2014 to May 24th 2016.

The men’s rankings were topped by Switzerland whom finished with 9877 points. Also earning three athlete quotas was France, Spain, Czech Republic and Italy. The nations which earned two athlete quotas are; Germany, Netherlands, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Portugal, South Africa and Brazil. The nations which earned one athlete quota are; Austria, Slovakia, United States, Argentina, New Zealand, Denmark, Sweden, Greece, Israel and Japan.

With the release of the rankings there are also some reallocations to be done. First the host quota has been reallocated to the next highest ranked nation, Hungary. Also since Brazil, South Africa, Japan, Australia and New Zealand all qualified through the rankings their spot won at the continental qualifiers are reallocated to the next highest ranked nation at that qualifier meaning Costa Rica, Rwanda and Hong Kong are qualified. However, since no other Oceania nation competed at the continental qualifier the next level of reallocation is through the Olympic Rankings of teams from the same continent meaning Guam has qualified. Since no other Oceania nation is ranked in the Olympic Rankings the quota has been reallocated to the next highest ranked nation overall in the Olympic Rankings, specifically Russia.

The women’s ranking was also topped by Switzerland whom finished with a total of 8614 points. Also earning two athlete quotas was Germany, Canada, France, United States, Slovenia, Poland and Ukraine. The nations which earned one athlete quota are; Russia, Norway, Denmark, Belgium, Brazil, Italy, Australia, Sweden and Serbia.

Like with the men’s rankings there are a couple of reallocations. Since Brazil qualified through the rankings the host quota was reallocated to the next highest ranked nation, Czech Republic. Also since Australia qualified through the rankings their spot won at the continental qualifiers was reallocated to the next highest ranked nation from that qualifier, New Zealand.

This was the final opportunity for nations to qualify to the Olympics in mountain biking. There is still the possibility for reallocation as some nations may decline some or all of their quotas. We should know one way or another over the coming weeks.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • France – 5
  • Switzerland – 5
  • Canada – 4
  • Czech Republic – 4
  • Germany – 4
  • Italy – 4
  • Australia – 3
  • Belgium – 3
  • Brazil – 3
  • Spain – 3
  • United States – 3
  • Denmark – 2
  • Netherlands – 2
  • New Zealand – 2
  • Poland – 2
  • Portugal – 2
  • Russia – 2
  • Slovenia – 2
  • South Africa – 2
  • Sweden – 2
  • Ukraine – 2
  • Argentina – 1
  • Austria – 1
  • Costa Rica – 1
  • Greece – 1
  • Guam – 1
  • Hong Kong – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Israel – 1
  • Japan – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Rwanda – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Slovakia – 1

 

References