Russia: Sport Federations Removed Athletes From Result of McLaren Report

With the publication of the McLaren Report on the accusation of government sponsored doping from Russia the IOC has ruled that Russia will not be banned from the 2016 Olympic Games, but gave each sport federation a set of rules to follow and remove athletes should they not meet the standards. The notable rules include the removal of all athletes implicated in the report, the removal of athletes whom have doped in the past and the removal of athletes which have not satisfied testing standards after excluding the results from the Moscow lab. While most sports did not make any changes others have.

Before the report was released athletics had already banned all of Russia’s athletes, with the exception of ones which have been out of the Russian testing system long enough. Currently only Darya Klishina has satisfied IAAF’s standard, she will compete in the women’s long jump. The other 67 athletes chosen by Russia did not make the standard. Yuliya Stepanova was also eligible to compete, but due to her role in exposing the Russian doping scandal she currently has not been selected to compete.

Besides athletics the biggest loss of athlete quotas comes from rowing. Originally Russia qualified five boats with 28 athletes (including 2 coxswains). In total 20 athletes were found to not have sufficient testing, causing World Rowing to remove four boats from Russia; the men’s lightweight fours, men’s eights, women’s lightweight double sculls and women’s eights. Russia was allowed to make a team to compete in the men’s fours out of the remaining six rowers; the two coxswains were technically eligible though for obvious reasons were not going to be selected. The reallocated boats went to Australia (women’s eights), Greece (men’s lightweight fours) and Italy (men’s eights and women’s lightweight double sculls).

Overall only one sport suffered a full banned. Due to multiple athletes getting caught doping the International Weightlifting Federation has completely banned Russia. Earlier Russia lost one man and one woman quota due to excess doping violations, but now they have lost the remaining eight (5 men, 3 women) quotas. The women’s quotas have been reallocated to Albania, Georgia and Moldova while the men’s quotas have been reallocated to Belgium, Croatia, El Salvador, Mongolia and Serbia.

In aquatics only swimmers were removed. Four athletes were removed due to having prior doping violations while three more were removed due to being implicated into the report. One of these athletes was open water swimmer Anastasia Krapivina. This means her quota has been reallocated to Hungary’s Anna Olasz.

The International Canoeing Federation announced five athletes scheduled to compete at the 2016 Olympics will be removed due to their involvement in the report. This has caused Russia to lose athlete quotas in five boats; men’s K2 200m, men’s C1 200m, men’s C2 1000m, women’s K1 200m and women’s K2 500m. The quotas have been reallocated to Austria (women’s K2 500m), Germany (women’s K1 200m), Iran (men’s C1 200m) and Sweden (men’s K2 200m). The men’s C2 1000m was not reallocated. The additional boat in the women’s K1 500m which did not use an athlete quota has also been removed.

Edit: Sweden has declined the quota, it has been reallocated to Canada

In cycling six athletes were withdrawn, three due to previous doping violations and three others whom were implicated in the report. Currently the UCI has not named the athletes or any potential change in the quotas.

In modern pentathlon Maksim Kustov and alternate Ilia Frolov were connected in the report and have been excluded. The quota was reallocated to Latvia’s Ruslan Nakonechnyi.

United World Wrestling removed one wrestler due to a prior doping violation. Viktor Lebedev has been removed from his event, men’s freestyle -57kg. The quota was reallocated to Belarus.

In sailing one athlete, in the men’s 470 was connected to the report and has been removed. However, Russia has been given an opportunity to make a late replacement.

In total, including athletics the Russian team has shrank by 122 athletes. While most of them were removed due to previous doping offenses or being included in the report others have been excluded due to being teammates of someone who has doped.

 

Net Athlete Quotas by Nations

  • Italy – 11
  • Australia – 9
  • Greece – 4
  • Austria – 2
  • Canada – 2
  • Albania – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Belgium – 1
  • Croatia – 1
  • El Salvador – 1
  • Georgia – 1
  • Germany – 1
  • Hungary – 1
  • Iran – 1
  • Latvia – 1
  • Moldova – 1
  • Mongolia – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • Russia – -122

 

Note: Possible cycling reallocations have yet to be announced.

 

References

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Rowing: Qualification Concludes With European and Final Regatta

In total 24 nations qualified boats at the 2016 European and Final Olympic Qualification Regatta. The regatta was split into two qualification tournaments. The European portion which includes entries from Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States had Olympic qualification for the top three boats in the single sculls and the top two boats in the lightweight double sculls. Like the other continental qualifiers a nation can only qualify one boat per gender. The final regatta portion contained the other 10 events where any nation can qualify. In total two boat quotas were available in the double sculls, quadruple sculls, eights, men’s pairs, men’s fours and men’s lightweight fours while four boat quotas were available in the women’s pairs. The European and Final Olympic Qualification Regatta was held in Lucerne, Switzerland from May 22nd to May 24th 2016.

In the European Regatta an extra boat quota was made available in the women’s single sculls due to a returned quota from the tripartite commission. The women’s single sculls was won by New Zealand’s Emma Twigg whom finished with a time of 7:21.870. Also joining her to the Olympics were boats from Ireland, Belarus and Denmark. The women’s lightweight doubles sculls was won by the Netherlands with a time of 6:54.910. Joining them was the silver medal boat from Romania.

On the men’s side the single sculls was won by Belgium’s Hannes Obreno whom won gold with a time of 6:47.610. Also qualifying to the Olympics were boats from Australia and Hungary. Belgium also won the men’s lightweight double sculls with a time of 6:21.780 while Turkey won the silver medal. Since a nation can only qualify one boat per gender at the continental qualifier this meant Belgium will have to pick between the men’s single sculls and lightweight double sculls. The non-selected boat will be reallocated to the next best boat here which will be Denmark regardless of choice.

At the Final Olympic Qualification Regatta Spain won the women’s pairs event with a time of 7:10.160. Joining them to the Olympics will be China, Italy and Poland. The women’s double sculls had the Czech Republic defeating Denmark with a time of 6:56.690. The women’s quadruple sculls was won by China whom finished 1.67 seconds ahead of the silver medalists from the Ukraine finishing with a time of 6:19.000. Romania won the women’s eights with a time of 6:02.560 while the Netherlands also qualified to the Olympics, finishing with the silver medal.

Among the men’s boats the Czech Republic won the men’s pairs with a time of 6:29.820 while Hungary also qualified by winning the silver medal. The men’s double sculls was won by Norway whom won by almost 2 seconds against Serbia, finishing with a time of 6:16.130. Similarly South Africa won the men’s fours by almost 2 seconds, winning against France with a time of 5:55.220. The men’s quadruple sculls was won by Russia whom defeated Canada with a time of 5:42.130. Russia was also able to win the men’s lightweight four by defeating Germany with a time of 6:02.970. The men’s eights had a three-way race for almost the entire race, but with only two Olympic quotas available Italy was the odd nation out as the United States won the gold over Poland with a time of 5:29.160.

This was the final opportunity for nations to qualify in rowing and with the exception of Belgium’s choice between the men’s single sculls and lightweight double sculls all of the boats competing are now known. In total 68 nations will be competing in rowing.

 

Boats by Nations

  • Belgium – 2*
  • China – 2
  • Denmark – 2
  • Hungary – 2
  • Netherlands – 2
  • Poland – 2
  • Romania – 2
  • Russia – 2
  • Australia – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Canada – 1
  • France – 1
  • Germany – 1
  • Ireland – 1
  • Italy – 1
  • New Zealand – 1
  • Norway – 1
  • Serbia – 1
  • South Africa – 1
  • Spain – 1
  • Turkey – 1
  • Ukraine – 1
  • United States – 1

* Must choose one boat

 

Athlete Quotas by Nations

  • Netherlands – 11
  • Poland – 11
  • Romania – 11
  • United States – 9
  • Russia – 8
  • China – 6
  • Canada – 4
  • Czech Republic – 4
  • France – 4
  • Germany – 4
  • South Africa – 4
  • Ukraine – 4
  • Belgium – 3*
  • Denmark – 3
  • Hungary – 3
  • Italy – 2
  • Norway – 2
  • Serbia – 2
  • Spain – 2
  • Turkey – 2
  • Australia – 1
  • Belarus – 1
  • Ireland – 1
  • New Zealand – 1

* Will either be 1 or 2 athlete quotas depending on boat choice

 

References

Rowing: Asian Regatta Updated and Tripartite Announced

World Rowing has updated its qualified nation list just before the final qualification regatta which is scheduled to commence in a week and a half. First from the Asian Qualification Regatta the nations which qualified two boats from the same gender have chosen the boat which they will participate in. South Korea chose to compete in the women’s single sculls while Vietnam has chosen to compete in the women’s lightweight double sculls. The quotas have since been reallocated to Thailand and Hong Kong in the single sculls and lightweight double sculls respectively.

World Rowing has also announced their tripartite quotas. The tripartite commission chooses nations which qualified an average of less than eight athletes in individual sports over the last two Olympics. Libya and Vanuatu were given quotas to compete in the men’s single sculls while Togo was given a spot to compete in the women’s single sculls. While there has been no official word it is likely that the final women’s single sculls tripartite quota will be reallocated to the final qualification regatta.

 

Boats by Nations

  • Hong Kong – 1
  • Libya – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Togo – 1
  • Vanuatu – 1

 

References

Rowing: Asian and Oceania Regatta Concludes However Reallocations Still Needed

Asian and Oceania nations had the opportunity to qualify boats at the 2016 Asian and Oceania Olympic Qualification Regatta. The top seven boats in the single sculls and the top three boats in the lightweight double sculls qualify their nation to the Olympics. In addition a nation can only qualify one boat per gender. The Asian and Oceania Olympic Qualification Regatta was held in Chungju, South Korea from April 22nd to April 25th 2016.

The top two in the four heats of the men’s single sculls advanced to the A/B semi-final while all other boats advanced to the repechage. The fastest boat was Indonesia’s Memo who won heat 3 with a time of 6:46.26. In the two repechages the top two advanced to the A/B semi-final. Uzbekistan’s Shakhnoz Kholmurzaev finished with the fastest time of 7:12.84 winning repechage 1. South Korea’s Kim Dong Yong won the first A/B semi-final with a time of 7:18.74 while Kazakhstan’s Vladislav Yakovlev won the second A/B semi-final with a time of 7:14.38. India, Indonesia, Iraq and Thailand also advanced to the A Final and thus became the first six boats to qualify to the Olympics. Kim would win the overall title with a time of 7:05.13. In the B final Uzbekistan’s Shakhnoz Kholmurzaev grabbed the final quota with a time of 7:13.83.

The top two in the three heats in the women’s single sculls advanced to the A/B semi-final while all other boats advanced to the repechage. The fastest boat was Chinese Taipei’s Wang Ming-Hui who won heat 1 and finished with a time of 7:31.15. In the two repechages the top three advanced to the A/B semi-final. Singapore’s Saiyidah Mohamed Rafa’ee finished with the fasted time of 8:06.23, winning repechage 2. Wang had another good performance in the A/B semi-final as she won the first race with a time of 8:01.86. South Korea’s Kim Yeji won the second A/B semi-final with a time of 7:57.64. Indonesia, Iran, Kazakhstan and Vietnam also advanced to the A final and thus became the first six boats to qualify to the Olympics. Kim would win the overall title with a time of 7:44.52. In the B final Singapore’s Saiyidah Mohamed Rafa’ee grabbed the final quota with a time of 7:53.13.

The top ranked boat in the two heats of the men’s lightweight double sculls advanced to the A final while all other boats advanced to the repechage. The first heat was won by Japan whom finished with a time of 6:20.70 while the second heat was won by India whom finished with a time of 6:22.75. In the two repechages the top two advanced to the A final. The repechages were won by China and Hong Kong with a time of 6:37.50 and 6:37.17 respectively. Also advancing to the A final were Indonesia and Uzbekistan. In the A final China won the event with a time of 6:24.70. Japan and Hong Kong won silver and bronze respectively and also qualified to the Olympics.

The top two ranked boats in the two heats of the women’s lightweight double sculls advanced to the A final while all other boats advanced to the repechage. Japan and South Korea won their heats with a time of 7:05.95 and 7:09.35 respectively. Also advancing to the A final were Hong Kong and Iran. In the single repechage the top two advanced to the A final. The repechage was won by Vietnam whom finished ahead of Kazakhstan to finish with a time of 7:23.05. In the A final Japan won the event with a time of 7:03.19. South Korea and Vietnam won silver and bronze respectively and also qualified to the Olympics.

Since a nation can only qualify one boat per gender there will be a couple of reallocations in the women events. South Korea and Vietnam must now choose which event they will compete in causing the other boat to be reallocated. Depending on the choice we could see Thailand and Qatar win a quota in the single sculls, Hong Kong and Thailand win a quota in the lightweight double sculls or a combination of Thailand and Hong Kong winning a quota in the single sculls and lightweight double sculls respectively.

 

Quotas by Nations

  • South Korea – 3*
  • Indonesia – 2
  • Japan – 2
  • Kazakhstan – 2
  • Vietnam – 2*
  • China – 1
  • Hong Kong – 1
  • India – 1
  • Iran – 1
  • Iraq – 1
  • Singapore – 1
  • Chinese Taipei – 1
  • Thailand – 1
  • Uzbekistan – 1

* Must choose boat

 

References

Rowing: Update on Latin America Regatta Qualifiers

FISA has given us an update about the qualified boats from the Latin America Regatta. Since a nation can only qualify one boat per gender some nations had to choose which event they will compete in meaning the other boat was reallocated to the next highest ranked nation. Also there was a slight change to the qualification format where the host quota reallocation now goes to the next highest ranked nation from the Latin America Regatta. Since Brazil has already qualified there will be seven quotas available in the single sculls for both genders. Here’s a list of qualified boats.

 

Men’s Single Sculls

  1. Mexico
  2. Argentina
  3. Peru
  4. Uruguay
  5. Venezuela
  6. Ecuador
  7. Paraguay

 

Men’s Lightweight Double Sculls

  1. Brazil
  2. Cuba
  3. Chile

 

Women’s Single Sculls

  1. Bermuda
  2. Mexico
  3. Trinidad and Tobago
  4. Argentina
  5. Paraguay
  6. Peru
  7. Bahamas

 

Women’s Lightweight Double Sculls

  1. Brazil
  2. Cuba
  3. Chile

 

References

Rowing: Nine Nations Qualify Boats After Latin American Regatta, Reallocations Still to Follow

Brazil managed to medal in all four events at the 2016 Latin American Olympic Qualification Regatta. The top six nations in the single sculls and the top three nations in the lightweight double sculls were given quotas to compete in the Olympics. However, there is a maximum of one boat per gender. The Latin American Olympic Qualification Regatta was held in Curauma, Chile from March 22nd to March 24th 2016.

The top two in the three heats of the men’s single sculls advanced to the A/B semi-final while all other boats advanced to the repechage. Mexico’s Julian Cabrera Perez had the fastest time in the heats, winning heat 1 with a time of 7:07.014. In the two repechages the top three advanced to the A/B semi-final. Uruguay’s Jhonatan Esquivel Montes finished with the fastest time of 7:07.453 in repechage 1. Cabrera Perez repeated his strong performance in the A/B semi-final, winning heat 1 with a time of 7:06.912. Brazil’s Steve Hiestand won the second semi-final with a time of 7:04.296. Argentina, Chile, Peru and Uruguay also qualified to the A Final and thus all six nations qualified to the Olympics. Cabrera Perez would go on to win the event with a time of 6:58.991. Argentina’s Brian Russo won silver while Hiestand won bronze.

The top two in the four heats of the women’s single sculls advanced to the A/B semi-final while all other boats advanced to the repechage. Mexico’s Kenia Lechuga Alenis had the fastest time in the heats, winning heat 4 with a time of 7:35.886. In the two repechages the top two advanced to the A/B semi-final. Chile’s Antonia Abraham Schuessler finished with the fastest time of 7:47.514 in repechage 1. Bermuda’s Michelle Pearson won the first race in the A/B semi-final with a time of 7:46.073. The second heat went to Lechuga Alenis whom finished with a time of 7:46.094. Brazil, Chile, Cuba and Trinidad and Tobago also qualified to the A Final and thus all six nations qualified to the Olympics. Pearson won the event with a time of 7:42.008 while Brazil’s Fabiana Beltramebiana won silver and Lechuga Alenia won bronze.

The winners of the two heats of the men’s lightweight double sculls advanced to the A Final while all other boats advanced to the repechage. The first heat was won by Mexico with a time of 6:20.942 while the second heat was won by Cuba with a time of 6:28.352. The top two from the two repechages advanced to the A Final. Chile and Brazil both won their respective heats while Argentina and Uruguay also advanced to the A Final. Brazil won the event with a time of 6:25.965 while Mexico and Cuba won the silver and bronze respectively as all three nations qualified to the Olympics.

The top two boats over the two heats of the women’s lightweight double sculls advanced to the A Final while all other boats advanced to the repechage. The first heat was won by El Salvador with a time of 7:12.461, Chile finished in second. The second heat was won by Cuba with a time of 7:15.346, Brazil finished second. The top two from the single repechage advanced to the A Final. The repechage was won by Argentina with a time of 7:10.956, Mexico finished second and also advanced to the A Final. Brazil won the event with a time of 7:08.950 while Cuba and Chile won the silver and bronze respectively as all three nations qualified to the Olympics.

Since Brazil and Mexico for the men and Brazil, Chile and Cuba for the women qualified in both boats they must now choose which event they will compete in while the other boat will be reallocated to the next highest ranked boat at this regatta. The reallocations will force another nation to choose between two boats, but in the end the following nations could potentially benefit from the reallocation; in the men’s singles sculls; Venezuela and Ecuador, in the men’s lightweight single sculls; Venezuela and Paraguay, in the women’s single sculls; Argentina, Paraguay and Peru and in the women’s lightweight double sculls; El Salvador, Argentina and Uruguay. Nations will have two weeks to submit which quota they will use so it will probably be a while before we will know the final qualification.

 

Boats by Nations

  • Brazil – 4*
  • Chile – 3*
  • Cuba – 3*
  • Mexico – 3*
  • Argentina – 1
  • Bermuda – 1
  • Peru – 1
  • Trinidad and Tobago – 1
  • Uruguay – 1

* Will be reduced

 

References

Rowing: Five African Nations Qualify Boats to the Olympics

Egypt led all nations at the 2015 African Olympic Qualification Regatta. The top 4 nations in the single sculls and the winner of the lightweight double sculls were given spots to compete. The African Olympic Qualification Regatta was held in Tunis, Tunisia from October 5th to October 7th 2015.

In the men’s single sculls it was Algeria’s Sid Ali Boudina whom led all boats after the heats, but it was Egypt’s Abdelkhalek which took the best time in the semifinals and was able to win the competition in the finals with a time of 7:06.01 over Tunsia’s Mohamed Taieb. Boudina won the bronze medal while Zimbabwe’s Peter Purcell Gilpin finished fourth and received the final quota.

The women’s single sculls was led by Micheen Thornycroft of Zimbabwe from start to finish. She was able to dominate the field as she finished almost 13 seconds ahead of Algeria’s Amina Rouba in the final with a time of 7:49.73. The bronze medal went to Chierika Ukogu of Nigeria while Egypt’s Heba Ahmed was given the final Olympic quota by finishing in fourth.

Both Egypt and Algeria were given byes to the final after they each respectively won their heats in the men’s lightweight double sculls. In the repechage it was Tunisia that won it as they and three other nations advance to the finals. The final was won by Egypt as they secured the only Olympic quota by defeating Angola by 4.05 seconds with a time of 6:46.18. Tunisia won the bronze with a time of 7:00.74.

Despite four initial entrants in the women’s lightweight double sculls only two nations actually competed. It was Tunisia that easily won the heat in a race that ultimately did not matter as both they and Egypt qualified to the finals. In the finals it was Tunisia again that easily won the duel as they finished over 30 seconds ahead of Egypt with a time of 7:44.32.

However since a nation can only qualify 1 male and 1 female boat at the continental championships it means Egypt must select between their single or lightweight double sculls. The boat that they don’t select will be reallocated to Libya or Angola respectively. This was the final opportunity for African nations to qualify in these four boat classes. African nations can still qualify in the other ten boats classes at the final Olympic qualification regatta to be held in 2016.

Boats by Nation

  • Egypt – 3
  • Algeria – 2
  • Tunisia – 2
  • Zimbabwe – 2
  • Nigeria – 1

Athletes by Nation

  • Egypt – 4
  • Tunisia – 3
  • Algeria – 2
  • Zimbabwe – 2
  • Nigeria – 1

References